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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog"

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West Virginia University 



FIFTY -SECOND YEAR 



CATALOGUE AND 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1918 : : : : 1919 




MORGANTOWN. WEST VIRGINIA 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 



CONTENTS 



Calendar 

Board of Control and Board of Regent* _ 6 

Officers Of Administration and Instruction 7 

Description of tin- Institution 

University feet and expenses 

Admission to the Tnivcrsity 

islflcation and Scholarship 

Degrees 

General Information 

Accredited Preparatory Schools 

Scope of the Entrance Requirements 

College of Arts and Sciences 

College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts 

College of Agriculture 

: icultural Experiment Station 

Instruction in Agriculture lgfl 

Instruction in Home Economics 

ricultural Extension Department 

College of Law. 

School Of M< 

School of Music 271 

Summer School 

Division of Military Science and Tl 

Degrees. Diplomas and Priies 

nts 

Address List of Faculty and Staff 

Summary of Enrollment 

Index 



CALENDAR FOR 1919- 1920 



19 19 


19 2 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


S 


M T 


w 


T 


F 


S 


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.M 


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1 


2 


3 


4 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 






| 1 1 2 3 








1| 2 


3 


E 


6| 7 


s 


9 


in 


11 


6 


7 


s 


9 


lo 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6| 71 8| 9 10 


4 5 


6 


7 


8| 9 


10 


12 


13|14 


L5 


16 


17 


is 


13 


14 


15 


n; 


17 


IS 


19 


11 


12 


13 14 15 1G 17 


11 12 13 


14 


15 16 


17 


19 


20121 


22 


2:: 


24 


25 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


18 


L9 


20 21 22 23 21 IS 1!) 20 21 22 23 24 


26 


27 28 


29 


30 


31 




27 


2S 


29 


30 


31 






25 


26 


27|28j29|30i31 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S 


M 


T 


\Y 


T 


F 


S 


s 


M 


T 


\v 


T F S 


S 


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T|F|S 














1 










1 11 2 


1 


2 


3 4 


5| 61 7 


1 


2! 3 


4 


5| 61 7 


_' 


3 


4 


r» 


6 


7 


8 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 8i 9 


8 


9 


10 11 


12 13 14 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 14 


9 


in 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


Hi 


11 


12 


13 


14 15|16 


15 


16 


1718 


192021 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 


21 


16 


17 


is 


in 


20 


21 


22 1' 


18 


19 


20 


21 22 23 


22 


23 


2425 


2(5 27 28 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 


28 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28|29|30 
1. 1 


29 

i 


ill! 


29 


30 


31 








MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


S 


M 


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s 


S 


M 


T 
~2 


\Y T F S 


S 


M| T 


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S|M|T|W T F S 




1 






1 




1 


3| 4| 5| 6 




1| 2 


3 1 4 


5! 6 


| l 1 2! 3j 4 


2 


3 


4| 5 


6 


7 


8 7 


8 


9 


10|11|12|13 


7 


8| 9 


10111 


12 13 


5| 6| 7| 8| 910 


11 


9 


10 


11|12 


13 


14 


15 14 


15 


16 


17|18|19|20 


14 


15116 


1718 


1920 


12|13|14|15|16|17 


18 


16 


17 


18|19 


211 


21 


22 21 


22 


23 


2412526127 


21 


22|23 


24125 


26!27 


19|20 ; '21 22 23 24 


25 


23 

30 


24 
31 


25126 


27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 


i 1 1 
1 1 1 


28 


29|30 

1 


311 

! 1 1 


26'27"28;29 30 

1 1 1 1 1 




APRIL 




OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


S M| T 


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S M T 


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I I 1 


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5 








1 


21 3| 4 






1] 21 3 


1 


1 


| 11 2 


6| 7| 8 


9|10|11 


12 5 


6 


7 


8 


9|10|11 


41 51 6 


7 


8| 9110 


3 4 


5l 6 




13 14 15 


16|17|18 


19 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16jl7|18 


1112|13 


1 1 


lBjie'i? 


10111 


1213 


14 15 16 


2d 21 22 


23|24|25 


26 


If. 


20 


21 


22 


23124125 


181920 


21 


22 23 24 


17 18 


19120 


2122 23 


27J28J29 

1 1 


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1 ! 




26 


27 


28 


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i 1 ! 


25j26'27 

1 1 


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24 25 

31| 


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1 1 ! 1 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


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NOVEMBER 


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1 1 1 


B 


1 5| 6| 7 


8| 9|10l 2 
15|1617 i< 


3 


4 


5 


6| 7| 8 


2 


31 4| 5 


6 


71 8 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 12 


13 


11112(13114 


10 


11 


12 


13H4|15 


9 


10 11112 


13 


1415 


14 


lb 


16 


Vi 


18 19 


2ii 


18 19|20|21 


22|23I24 16 


17 


18 


19 


20|21[22 


16 


1711819 


20 


21]22 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25126 


2, 


2526j27|28 


29(30131 23 


24 


25 


26 


27|28|29 


23 


24|25|26 


27 


2829 


28 


29 


,10 








1 1 1 


1 1 


30 








1 1 


30 


31 


















JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M T W|T!F|S 


S |MjT|W|T|F|S 


S|M 


T \Y T F 


S 


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1! 2 3 1 5| 6| 7 | 1| 2| 3 |4| 5|~6 


1 


1 2| 31 4 


5 






1 1 


2| 3| 4 


B 9 1011 12 13114 7| 8| 9|10 


11|12|13 


6| 7 


8 9 10 11 


12 


5 


6 


7| 8 


9 lo 11 


if. i»; 17 is i!. 20121 14 15 16 17 


18|19|20 


13|14 


15161718 


19 


12 


13 


14J15 


16 17 IS 


22 23 24 25126(27128 21|22|23|24|25I26 27 


20|21 


22|23|24|25j26 19 


20 


21|22 


23 24 25 


29 


30 










1 


28 


29 


30 


31 








27 


2S 


29 


30 




1 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 31 





UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 



19 19 

June 19, Thursday Comm 

June 23, Monday Summer School Bej 

September 12, Friday Summer Scho 

_'. Monday Flrsl 

Beptember 22, 23, 24, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday 

Matriculation and li.-cistnr 

September 25, Thursday i 

November 21, Friday l>a\ 

mix r 27, Thursday, to November :'■". Sunday. Inclusive 

Thanksgivii . 

December 1, Monday Recltail 

':.• r 5, Friday 

Ninth Anniversary Meeting of the Phi Beta K 

December 2". Saturday, to January 1. ll'L'". Thursday, Inclusiv 

Christmas Holiday R 

19 2 

January L'. Friday Recital line 

January 31. Saturday Itations of First Sem 

January 31, Saturday, to February 6, Friday, inch: 

Final Examinations of First Sem 

February 9. Monday Second Sem 

February 9, 10, Monday ami Tuesday Registration of s 

February 11, Wednesday Fir 

April :;. Friday Day of Mid 

June 6, Saturday La itions of Second >■ 

Juih> 3, Monday, to June 13, Saturday. Inclusive 

Final Fxaininati | 

June it. Wednesday i :omm< 



West Virginia University 

MORGANTOWN 
BS1 LBLISHED FEBRUABY 7, 1867. 



THE STATE BOARD OF CONTROL. 

403 Capitol Street 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

E. B. STEPHENSON. Pbesident Charleston, W. Va. 

J. M. WILLIAMSON, Treasurer Charleston, W. Va. 

JAMES S. LAKIN Charleston. W. Va. 

The State Board of Control has the direction of the financial and 
business affairs of the state educational institutions. 



THE STATE BOARD OF REGENTS 

State Capitol Building 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

M. P. SHAWKEY, State Superintendent of Schools, 

President Charleston, W. Va. 

GEORGE S. LAIDLEY Charleston, W. Va. 

EARL W. OGLEBAY Wheeling, W. Va. 

NOAH G. KEIM Elkins, W. Va. 

FRANK N. SYCAFOOSE Webster Springs. W. Va. 

The State Board of Regents has charge of all matters of a purely 
scholastic nature concerning the state educational institutions. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS. 

OF THE UNIVERSITY 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M.. LLD., Preside*! 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, \M. Litt.D. Chaplo 

ALFRED JARRETT HARK. A M . Si < u I iVf am. R» isti 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE, A.B., Di lr 01 Womn 

DAVID DALE JOHNSON, LM„ Editor of thi U*rvER8m Buu-im 

DENNIS MARTIN willis. ll.m.. FntANCiAi Secretart 

OF THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS. 

The Colh <)• of Arte and fi 
JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN, Ph.D., Di ir 

The Coll* Q( <" Eng i 
CLEMENT ROSS JONES, M ML. Dear 

• Agricultun 

JOHN* LEE COULTER,' Ph.D.. Dear wn Dl 

I Dl \l. EXPl R1MENT S I a i IOR 
(ALVIX R. TITLOW. DlRECTOB LTURAI EXTERSIOR 

Thi OoUegt 
HENRY CRAIG JONES, A. P.. LL.B., I 

Thr BchOOl 

JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON. MR. DEAJI 

" 
LOUIS BLACK, Director 

'Iff 8m - fool 

WAITMAN BARBE, Litt.D., Directoi 



THE COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION. 
The President of the Unlver !leges. 

THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY. 

The President, Deans of the varlou . i, Pi 

Professors and Assistanl Pn d all div 

th< Dean Of Women, the Commandant o: of tho 

School of MOBiC and the Librarian of ill- tv. 



WILLI \ M 
HOR .DBRMAN, 

Resigned April 
to succeed him. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Entrance: The deans of the three colleges admitting freshmen. 

Classification and Grades: Professors HARE. J. R. TROTTER, 
SHEETS, and GRUMBEIX, and Assistant Professor MORRIS 
(Secretary ). 

GRADUATE Work: Dean CALLAHAN, Professors DEAHL, SHELDON, 
WAGGONER, and DAVIS (Secretary). 

Public Exercises: Professor NEIL, TRUSCOTT, and EMORY, Direc- 
tor BLACK (Secretary), and Mr. HUPP. 

Prizes: Professor VICKERS, Dean H. C. JONES, and Professors NEIL. 
HODGSON, and CANNADAY. 

Lurrary: Mr. ARNETT. Professors ARMSTRONG, REESE, ALDER- 
MAN. HAYES, CLARK, BROWN, and EIESLAND. 

Women Students: Dean MOORE. Assistant Professor COLWELL, Miss 
ATKESON, Miss HAYES, and Miss POLLOCK. 

University Publications: Associate Professor D. D. JOHNSON. Pro- 
fessors BARBE, CANNADAY. FORMAN, and SIMONTON, and 
Mr. STOCKDALE. 

Student Publications: . Professors WHITEHILL, STATHERS, CHIT- 
WOOD, MORRIS, and BISHOP, and Associate Professor SMITH. 

Simmer School: President TROTTER, Dean CALLAHAN, and Profes 
sors BARBE, DEAHL, and WINKLER. 

Military and Gynasium Board: Major MUMMA. Dean SIMPSON, and 
Professor HARE. 

Social Affatrs: Associate Professor DARBY, Professors COX and 
NEIL, Dean MOORE. Major MUMMA, Mrs. Snee, and Miss POL- 
LOCK. 

Fraternities: Associate Professor SMITH, (Delta Tau Delta). Pro- 
fessor REESE (Beta Theta Pi). Mr. WILLIS (Phi Sigma Kappa), 
Associate Professor HARDMAN (Sigma Nu), Mr. ARNETT (Sigma 
Chi). Professor TRUSCOTT (Phi Kappa Psi), Professor ARM- 
STRONG (Kappa Alpha), Assistant Professor GROW (Sigma Phi 
Epsilon), and Mr. GLEN HUNTER (Phi Kappa Sis-ma ). 

Sororities: Miss COLWELL (Alpha Xi Delta). Mrs. HITE (Kappa 
Kappa Gamma). Mrs. BARBE (Chi Omega) and Miss FOX, (Pi 
Beta Phi). 

THE ATHLETIC BOARD. 

Faculty Members: Director STANSBURY (Ex-officio), Professor 
STEMPLE. Assistant Professor PRICE. 

Alumni Memrers: J. FRENCH ROBINSON, Philippi. W. Va. (Term 
expires June 30, 1919). STEPHEN GOODLOE JACKSON, Clarks- 
burg, W. Va. (Term expires June 30. 1918 L 

Student Members: DAVID ALFRED CHRISTOPHER (Term expires 
June 30, 1918). KARL BYRON KYLE, Jr. (Term expires June 
30, 1919). 



STAFF OF INSTRUCTION. 

PROFESSORS. 

DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON, PH.D., LL.D.. Pretifimi I P 

PMiotopfty, r.iti'iiut* 
JAMES SCOTT STBWART, MS. P lfo*»e»a»tai I 

ROBERT WILLIAM DOUTHAT. LK. PH.D., ' »/ ' 

Emeritu*. 

WILLIAM PATRICK WILLLV. AM. »<*«* '«*« 

,/, nee, tmd 0omin< rd«J Laic, Bun r««J 
THOMAS CLARK atklson. Ph.D., Pro/c#«>f 0/ mimal ff«t6ati< 

rttiM 
ALEXANDER REID WHITKH ILL. A.M . Ph.] >., P 
FREDERICK LINCOLN EMORY, B.S., M.E., Pi 

and Applied Mathematics 
SAMUEL BOARDMAN BROWN, A.M. /' 

ROBERT ALLLN ARMSTRONG, A.M.. L.H.D., Pro) 

Lanftuapr ami Literati 
BERT holmks IUTL. M.S.. Profestot Mural Chemiitry 

ALFRED JARRETT HARE, A.M.. Profe8$or of Latin Language 

Literatun 
FREDERICK WILSON TRUSOOTT,' Ph.D., P 

Languagi i and LiU ratun 
CLEMENT ROSS JONES, M.M.K.. Profe$sor of Poic r En* neering 
RUSSELL LOVE mollis. C.E., P Batliray and fftafaoay 

f.i i g in' > ring 
JOHN LEWIS SHELDON, Ph.D.. Profesior of Botany 
JASPER NEWTON DEAHL, Ph.D., P "" 

JAMES MORTON CALL MIAN. PH.D., PrOfe$90T Of Ui9t( 

ti< a\ 8( i( 
JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON. AC. MO. Pro) 
JOHN HARRINGTON COX, A M . /•■■ i:,nili.sh Phita 

JOHN ARNDT BIESLAND, Ph.D., r of Mnth.m-- 

ALBKHT MOORE REESE, Ph.D., P 

OLIVER PERRY OHITWOOD, Pn.n. P iropwwi H - 

CHARLES EDMUND NEIL, AM. P Hie & 






10 West Virginia University 

JAMES RUSSELL TROTTER. 1 A.M., LL.B.. Professor of Law 

CMAUNCEY WILLI AM WAGGONER, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

LOUIS BLACK. Head of the Department of Vocal Music 

MADISON STATHERS, Ph.D.. Professor of Romance Languages 

WAITMAN BARBE, A.M., Lttt.D., Professor of English 

ENOCH HOWARD VICKERS. A.M., Professor of Economics and Socio- 

loffy 
LLOYD LOWNDES FRIEND, A.M.. Professor of Secondary Education 
CHARLES EDWARD BISHOP, Ph.D., Professor of Greek Language 

and Literature 
WILLIAM HORACE ALDERMAN, B.S.Agr., Professor of Horticulture 
ROLAND PARKER DAVIS. S.B., M.C.E., Professor of Structural and 

Hydraulic Engineering 
AARON ARKIN, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Pathology and Medical Bac- 
teriology 
JOSEPH ELLIS HODGSON, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 
EARL WOODDELL SHEETS. 2 B.S.Agr., M.S. Professor of Animal 

Husbandry 
HENRY CRAIG JONES, 3 A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law 
FRIEND BBENEZER CLARK, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 
LEONARD MARION PEAIRS. B.S.Agr., M.S., Professor of Entomology 
FRANCIS LORETTE STRICKLAND, Ph.D., D.D., Professor of Phil- 
osophy 
CHARLES BENTON CANNADAY, A.M.. Professor of Latin 
JOHN BEHNY GRUMBEIN, M.M.E., Professor of Steam and Experi- 
mental Engineering 
ALEXANDER HARDIE FORMAN, M.M.E.. Ph.D., Professor of Elec- 
trical Engineering 
JAMES WIGGIN SIMONTON, 4 A.B., J.D.. Professor of Law 
CHARLES HENRY AMBLER. Ph.D., Professor of History (Extension) 
CHARLES HERMAN WINKLER. Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural 

Vocational Education 
FORREST WILBUR STEMPLE. M.S., Professor of Agronomy 
EDWARD NATHAN ZERN, B.S.E.M., Lecturer on Mining Engineering 
LESLIE DAVID HAYES, M.E.. Professor of Machine Design and Con- 
struction 



leave of absence. With the United States Food Administration. 

eave of absence. With United states Department of Agriculture. 

if absence during first semester. With the American Red Cross 
Service. 

eave of absence during first semester. With the War Trade Board. 



s 



;: 



LOR I M BR VI> 

ALBERT L. STILLMAN, E. M.. M B • C 
Prop *sor of Mi: 

HARLAN LESLIE Ml'MM I t7»««d 

Jfllfta £ 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS. 
SIMEON CONANT SMITH. AM.. 4 

ARLEIGH LEE DARBY, 1 AM 
gmat 

A) DMA-] .JoHXSOX. A.M . 
kRLES AUGUSTUS LUEDER, D.Y.M.. 

THOMAS PORTER HARDMAN. MA.. Ji i: I 

RACHEL HARTSHORN COLWELL, B.S.. A.M.. r Of 

Rural Economics and >it 

ANDREW JACKSON DADISMAN, M B 0/ 

Rural Economic* and Farm Mat 

ICUEL JOHN MORRIS. MR, .1- naUmn 

EDGAR LEWIS ANDREWS. B.S.A Urxj 

Htubmmdru 

LUCIUS MOODY BRISTOL.' Ph.D. 

ARTHUR ADAMS HALL. B.S.. M.E.. 4sso \aU Pro*. *sor of / 

Engim > ring 
ALFRED OOPELAND CALLEN, K.M.. M.S. A w of 

MkUng 
BENJAMIN TOWNE LELAND, A.M. ! 0/ Industrial 

'"' at ion 
LA". : BENJAMIN HILL. A.M.. Hon 

WITHROW MORSE. Ph.D. 

Physiological C) 
HENRY ALBERT JONES. Ph.D. t U r, 



1 On • 

3 On lei .sence. With the 

Italy. 
3 On le;ive of . . ce 

leave of the Ami 

r Relieved Fehruarv 1, 19 
lied, February 1, 15 



12 West Virginia University 

assistant professors. 

FREDERIC CURTIS BUTTERFIELD, 1 A.B., Head of the Piano De- 
part m< ni in Hi' School Of Music 

BENJAMIN WALTER KING,' A.B., Assistant Professor of Economics 

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG PRICE, 1 Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of 
Geology 

SIMEON THOMPSON HART, M.E., Assistant Professor of Machine 
Construction and Superintendent of Shops 

HUBERT HILL, M.S.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

LEO CARLIN, 3 A.B., LL.B., Assistant Professor of Laiu 

JOHN JONATHAN YOKE, B.S.Agk., Assistant Professor of Animal 
Husbandry 

ROBERT MUNDHENK SALTER, M.S., Assistant Professor of Soils 

GORDON ALGER BERGY. Ph.C, B.S., Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

HENRY WYATT RICHEY, B.S.Agr., Assistant Professor of Horti- 
culture 

GEORGE WALTER GROW. B.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of Drawing 
Machine Design 

SAMUEL MORRIS, M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

HARRISON RANDALL HUNT, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

ROBERT CAMERON COLWELL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics 

GIDEON STANHOPE DODDS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Histology 
and Embryology 

MERLE LOUIS NEBEL. 4 Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geology 

FREDERIC DANIEL CHEYDLEUR, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Ro- 
mance Languages 

ROBERT ZERUBABEL VIRGIN, Assistant Director of Mining Exten- 
sion 

DONALD J. MYERS, Captain. United States Army. Assistant Command- 
ant of Cadets 

JOHN HAGER RANDOLPH. Lieutenant. United States Army. Assistant 
Commandant of Cadets 



1 On leave of absence. With Young Men's Christian Association in France. 
'-On leave of absence during- first, semester. In United States Military 

Service. 
'<>n leave of absence during first semester. With War Trade Board. 
' i >led, < October 12, 1918. 
"<>n leave Of absence in United States Shipbuilding- Service. 



Staff ( »i [nstbi cnoa 13 

INSTRUCTORS. 

SUSAN maxwell MOORE, a.i; .. Instru 

GRACE MARTIN SNEE, P.M.. Instructor In Piano and Pip 

RUFL'S ASA WEST, Instructor in MetoJworking 

FLORA kay HAYES, a P.. Instructor in Theory and Hisi 

ROBERT WALDO FISHLK. M.D.. / 

1RVIN HARDY, M.D.. TnStrU* tor in Minor Sum- rii 

raymer EGBERT 9EAMAN, Instructor In Woodworking and I 

HARLEY LUCIUS CRANE, r. s.v k.. Instructor In HorticuUut 
ROBERT CLIFTON SPANGLER, AM. Instructor in B 
CHESTER PENN HIGBY, I'li.I)., Instructor in Bit 

\ Li'KLLA pollock. A.M.. Instruct 
CHARLES N JOLLIEEE. PS . 

NINA CATHERINE REILLY. B.S., Instru tor in I 
WILLIAM OLIVER GNAGEY, Mechanician in th> Cottegt 

pall CHARLES ROUZER, P.s.v *., h Itural Educa- 

tion 

MAX DONNER, Instructor in Violin 

MARY MEEK ATKBSON, L1L, Instructor In English 
3LJE ANKROM, B.s.A. i:.. 1 In Horticuitt 

\R WILLIAMS, a.m.. Instructor in English 

AXTOXIO JOSEPH PROVOST, B.L.. Instructor in Rcmana L 

ERNEST :. 

GLADYS GRIMSHAW GILL, B 

(LARA rowexa schmidt. R.s.Ei... Instructor in E 

ELWOOD GEORGE LIMPRECHT. PS ME.. <ind 

M'V h in> />■ I 

THOMAS JACKSON P.LAI!: 

ARTHUR KENT BRAKE, 1 PS E K 

HUGH axdersox. Instructor in Mining (Extension) 

HARRY EDWARD GRAY, Instru- tor in Mining | / 
VALERIE ELIZABETH BOHULTZ, a. p.. Instructor (n 

om 



1 Res 



14 West Virginia University 

MAX BONNER. Instructor in Tiotim 

HAROLD FRANTZ RO jL- Instructor in Chemistry 

ROBERT MORRIS WYLIE/ A M_ Instructor in Physics 
CHA? ~M_ Instructor in History 

HUNTER WHITING. 1 JIB, Instructor in French 
LAURA F. LEWIS/ AB.. Instructor in English 

7ER ALEXANDER M T. Assistant in Musk 

LUCILE WARE ELLIOTT. Assistant in Pu 

LILLIAN KNIGHT GAR?. sistant in Yoke and Public School 

y . : 

CLARICE HOBENSACH, B.S.Eou., Assistant in Mathematics 
ELMA HOARD. B.S.. Assistant in Bacteriology and Pathology 
HELEN WIESTLING, A.B., Assistant in Pharmacology and Physiology 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS. 

lYRTLLE FLING, AB., Student Assistant in Botany 

MARGARET DICKEY RICHARDS, Student Assistant in Botany 

OTTO HAZELTON H :udent Assistant in Steam and Ej 

mental Engineering 

;1ER, Student Assistant in Mathem- 

IL ORVAL ?.. t Assistant in Chemistry 

. UNDERWOOD, Student Assistant stry 

PAUL EDMUND H Assistamt in Chemistry 



1 Temporarily transferred from the faculty of the Fairmont State X 

- 
* Transferred from the faculty of the Marshall College 

•Transferred from the faculty of the Glenville mal 3chool for 

first semester. 

i from the faculty of the Fairmont mal School for 

1 >1>. 



THE WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 
STATION STAFF 

JOHN LEE COULTER. A.M.. Pb 

WILLIAM HORACE ALDERMAN- 
BERT HOLMES HITE M - 

NAHUM JAMES GIDDINOS - ?lant Patholo 

WILLIAM EARL RUMS 

HORACE AT WOOD. H Poultry man 

LEONARD MARION PEAIRS. B Entomoh 

EARL WOODDELL SHEET- LutmoJ B 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS LUEDER. D.Y.M tHan 

LEE IRVING KNIGHT. 1 Ph.D.. Plant Ph 

ANDREW JACKSON DADISMAN. M - I 

ISAAC SCOTT COOK. Jr.. B.S.A ■»•■ ist 

HENRY ALBERT JONES. Ph.D., ^- Horticulturist 

LUTHER PH BUTTON, ELS "t Horticulturist 

Superintend* I maun Memorial Experiment Farm 

EDGAR LEWIS ANDREWS. B - *ant Poultry 

ANTHONY BERG. B.S.. Assistant Plant Pmtkota 

CHARLES EDWARD WEAKLEY. Jr./ Assistant 

FRANK BATSON KUNST. A.B.. Assistant Chemist 

JAN HENDRICK BERGHUIS-KRAK. B S 

ROBERT MUNDHENK SALTER. MS 
- >ils) 

JOHN JONATHAN YOKE. R.S.. Atttti 

CHARLES ELLSWORTH STOCKDALK 

ROSS HOMAN TUCKWILLER.' BUS I ttmni in Hus- 

bandry 

CHARLES FAYE SARLE - nt 

THEODORE CLINTON M.ILVAINE. 

ROLAND HARRISON PATCH. ' - <istant Horti'Ulti 



1 On leave of abse- Decemb-- 

1 On leave of • i the I'ni- 

Attn the 
191 

e from October 1 to DeeemT 

5 In 

• On leave of 

T On leave of absence. With 



16 WEST Virginia UNIVERSITY 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DEPARTMENT STAFF. 

CALVIN R. TITLOW. Dirt ctor 

CHARLES HENRY HARTLEY, B.S., Assistant to the Director 

NAT TERRY FRAME.- A.B., State Agent in Charg> Farmers' Oo-oper 
ation Demonstration Work 

BELTON BONNER EZELL. J B.S.. Assistant State Agent 

HI* SWISHER VAXDERVORT, 2 B.S.ASB., Assistant Statt A 

WILLIAM HENRY KENDRICK/ B.S., StaU Agent m Charg< Boys' 

Clubs 

STUART ALVERTON CODY, Assistant Poultry Club Agent 

MARIAN MARTHA HEPWORTH,- B.S., Associate Professor of Home 
Economics (Extension) 

SADIE RAY GUSEMAN,- B.S.. . psl n Chargt Q rW 

HARRY ORAL HENDERSON.- M.S.. Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

ROBERT BARCLAY DUSTMAN/ B.S.A<:: onomy 

(E: I 

WITHROW REYNOLDS LEGGE.' M.S.. Instructor in Horticulture 

I 

KATHRYN ALGER,- A.B., B.S.Am:.. Assistant in li'i 

EDWARD LEE SHAW,- B.S.A«k., Instn nal Husbandry 

LAWRENCE VINCENT STARKEY, M.S.. Instructor in Annual Hus- 
bandry (Extension ) 

ROBERT REED HOG! (list 

DEE CRANE, Potato 8p€i ialist 

HARRY HORTON FAIRBANKS, Veti tUist (Extension) 

SAMUEL LOWELL DODD. Jk..' Instructor in Plant Pathology (Ex- 



Igned May I, II 

.•h rnit<- rlcultore. 

-'ned April 1, I 

in United States Militai 



17 

LIBRARY STAP- 

LONNA DENNIS ARNETT, Ph.D. Librarian 
MARY ADELAIDE FO>. :rimm 

\TE DELAWDER BOUGH >. ustant Librarian 

ION A SMITH ■! Librarian 

VIVIAN GORDON REYNOL" - .ant 

OTHER OFFICERS. 

JOHN CLEM *E -y Young 

tian AssKh vation 

HARRY ADAV S 8TANS 

CHANDLER LINN BROOK- 3 mild in f* an 

OLBORN. Matrc Halt 






THE UNIVERSITY 



DESCRIPTION OF THE INSTITUTION. 

LOCATION. 

sforgantown, th< the University, is the count] 

Monongalia county, it is a beautiful town of twelve thousand Inhabi- 
tants, located on the sfonongahels river ami <>n the Baltimore snd 

Ohio Railroad, the IforgantOWn and KlngWOOd Railroad, and 

ifonongahela Railway, 103 mil< 

tance south of Pittsburg, it has modern convenience* of natural - 

water-works, electric UghtS, street railways, local and long (list 
telephones, and is noted for its healthful conditions, physical, social, 
anil moral. There are churches of the following denominations in the 
town: Presbyterian, Methodist pal, Ifethodlsl Protestant 

tist. Protestant Episcopal. Lutheran, Christian ami Roman Catholic 




m \r «»K PART r>F r\MIT 



Pew Institutions of learning have more attractive natural - 
The University grounds border the sfonongahela river and afl 



20 West Virginia University Catalogue 

most picturesque outlook. The campus comprises about fifty acres. 
The University farms, a mile distant from the campus, contain in all 
almost seven hundred acres. 

HISTORY. 

West Virginia University originated from the national land grant 
act of June 2, 1862. and from the subsequent action of the state legis- 
lature in accepting and carrying out the provisions of the act. On 
January 9, 1866, the board of trustees of the Monongalia Academy at 
Morgantown tendered to the legislature for the use of the contem- 
plated state or land grant college, all its property, including Woodburn 
Female Seminary, estimated at $51,000, on condition that the college 
should be located at Morgantown. On January 30, 1867, the legisla- 
ture accepted the property and on February 7 passed an act perma- 
nently establishing "The Agricultural College of West Virginia" and 
authorizing the governor to appoint eleven suitable persons as a board 
of visitors. 

The eleven visitors held the first meeting on April 3, 1867, at 
which time they appointed Alexander Martin president and estab- 
lished collegiate, scientific and agricultural departments of instruction. 

By an act of December 4, 1868, the name of the college was 
changed to "West Virginia University" and the "board of visitors" to 
the "board of regents." 

The dates of the establishment of the special colleges and schools 
now comprised in the University are as follows: The College of Law, 
1878; the College of Engineering, 1887; the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1888; the College of Agriculture, 1897; the School of Music, 
1897; the School of Medicine, 1902. 

The University has had nine regular presidents. Alexander Martin 
resigned in 1875. He was succeeded by John W. Scott (acting presi- 
dent), 1875-7; John Rhey Thompson, 1877-81; Daniel Boardman Purin- 
ton (acting president), 1881-2; William L. Wilson, 1882-3; Robert C. 
Berkeley (chairman of the faculty), 1883-5; Eli Marsh Turner. 1885-93; 
Powell Benton Reynolds (acting president), 1893-5; James L. Good- 
night, 1895-7; Jerome Hall Raymond, 1897-01; Daniel Boardman Purin- 
ton, 1901-11; Thomas Edward Hodges, 1911-14; Frank Butler Trotter 
(acting president. 1914-1916), 1916. 

GOVERNMENT AND ORGANIZATION. 

The financial and business affairs of the University and of all the 
other state educational institutions are directed by a State Board of 
Control consisting of three members appointed by the governor. This 
board also exercises a general control over the various public insti- 



«BBAL A - 1 

tutions of the state. Tb€ Academic control of the University and 

of the other educational institutions of the 

of the School for the Deaf, Dumb and Blind M,)1 . 

and The Girls' Industrial School, is rented in I 

The board is bi-partisan and 
ent of free schools (ex-officio). who Is ele< 
four other members who are ap] aor. 

The internal administration of the Qniversltj 
Bldent, The Council Of Administration, and the I'nio-: lltV. 

All matters of a purely administrative or ei re in the 

ham: Preaidenl alone or of the President and Council. The 

;ity is the general legislative bod) ; it fixes r h- for 

entrance and graduation and has Immediate 

educational policy of the institution. Any proposal to chai 
policy in an; made in writing at a meeting of 

Faculty. 

The regular meetings of the Faculty an p. m. on the first 

Monday after the opening of each semester p. m. on the 

Friday preceding examinations at the close of the ft] 
and at 9 a. m. on the Saturday preceding CommeJ cial 

tings may be called by the President at any time. 
Subordinate to the Faculty are a number of standing commr 
appointed by the President. See page 8. 
The En: : conization embraces: 

The College of Arts and Scier 
The College of Engineering and Mechanic A 
The College of Agriculture. 
The College of Law. 
The following schools and divisions nre connected with the Uni- 
ty in their management and work, but do not confer degrees: 
The School of Medicine. 
The School of Music. 
The Summer School. 

The Division of Military Science and Tactics. 
The West Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station 
The Division of Agricultur ion 

FUNDS. 

The funds for maintain]':.- diversity are derived tron 

following sources: (1) Interest on the land grant endowment of 
$115.7. r »0: (2) the Morrill fund: (3) the Hatch fund; (4) the Ada 
fund: (6) the Smith-Hughes and the Smith-Lever funds; (6) biennial 
appropriations by the ad tuition. T 

annual income of the University and Experiment Station from all 
sources is now approximately |800,000. 



ibgixia University Catalogue 
buildings. 

buildings are as follows: 

I. Woodburn Hall, a three-story building, containing the adminis- 

lecture rooms, the law library and various labora- 
v.r:e = 

. - ice HalL a three-story building, containing lecture rooms 
and laboratories for the department of chemi- 

3. Martin HalL a three-story building, containing the recitation 
rooms and laboratories of the department of : r.d the halls of 
the Columbian and Parthenon literary socie: 

4. Commencement Hall, a large two-story building, containing a 
commodic -■".. with 1,500 seats, and the gymnasium. 

iltural Building, a four-story building, just completed, 
containing the laboratories and offices of the College of Agriculture. 

The Experiment Station Building, containing the cher.. 
laboratories and soils laboratories : iltural Experiment Sta- 

tion. 

7. The Armory and Drill Hall, for the Division of Military Science. 
; Mechanical Hall, occupied by the College of Engineering and 
Mechanical Ar 7_»artment of geology, and the State Road Com- 

mission. 

The Medical building, a three-story brick building containing 
ire rooms and laboratories of the School of Medicme. 
10. The Library, containing the general library and reading and 
seminary rooms. 

II. The Women's Hall, dormitory for women stud- 

12. The President's Hon 

13. 7 ant. 

14. The Horticultural Building, containing the off:' tation 
rooms and laboratories of the department of horticulture. 

15. The Demonstration Cottage, in charge of the department of 
borne econorr 

16. The Ui Greenhouse. 

17. 1 -et-Ball Building. 
The Livestock Pavilion. 

=--re the various buildings on the University 
7 1 m 



- 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 




The Library Building is a three-story stone structure. 1*» test 
long by 50 feet wide, with book room annex in the rear. The bas e 
■lent of the building is used for storage. On the first, or main floor, 
are the reading and reference rooms, the cataloguing rooms and the 
office of the librarian. On the upper floors are rooms for govern- 
ment documents, for storage, and for dass work. 

The reading and reference rooms are equipped with modern 
library appliances and are convenient to the booh room in the rear, 
.brary consists of the General and Law Libraries. 
The General Library is located in the Library Building and numbers 
about 54.000 Tolumes. The Law Library, located in Woodbarn HalL 
numbers about 13.000 volumes. The library of the Agricultural 

-<>w shelved with and is a part of the General 
Library. Two hundred and seventy-five periodicals, 
cations of societies, are received. Most of the cotmty 

e are on file in the reading room. 

All officers and students, and, under spei 
not connected with Urn have the privilege of drawing 

from the library for home use, two volumes being allowed at one 
The corps of instruction have direct access to the shelves 
may have this privilege for special investigation upon 
tion of their instructors. The most important 
books used in connection with the cum sea of 
between 4.000 and 5.000. are kept on open shelves i 
- • ~; A t: .:■.■:■.: :■--;- ?>.-'.? ".:*: - r. : -'--r 
provided and the members of the library staff are ready at 
to give assistance in r e s e a r c h and investigation 

pen from 7:45 a. m. to 10 p. m. every week day 
during the semester except Friday, when it is dosed at ? p. m. It is 
closed on- Thanksgiving day. Christmas day. New Tear's day and the 
Fourth of July. On Sundays the Library is open for readers from 
5 p. m. No books may be borrowed on Sunday. During the 
>tmas and summer vacations it is open on week days from 8 to 
12 a. m. 

PHYSICAL LABORATORIES. 

department of physics occupies Martin HalL The general 
lecture room is provided with water, gas, compressed air. electrical 
power, a special device for rapidly darkening the room, and a 
masonry pier for galvanometers, etc requiring a 
port. The two general laboratories are large r nof/ 
forty students working at one time and are equipped with the view 
of accomplishing the maximum amount of laboratory work in the 





24 West Virginia University Catalogue 

minimum time. The photometer room is equipped with a Reichanstalt- 
Summer-Brodhun photometer and a Hilger Constant Deviation Spectro- 
photometer. The electrical standardizing laboratory is equipped 
with three individual switchboards connecting with the main power 
board, a full line of D. C. and A. C. measuring instruments, six mounted 
galvanometers, a Leeds and Northrup Potentiometer with standard 
cells and resistances for D. C. calibration, a Siemens Dynamometer for 
A. C. calibration, Thompson, Ring and Epstein sets for iron testing, 
standard capacities and Wheatstone and Cary-Foster Bridges for resist- 
ance measurements. The shop is supplied with a full line of bench 
tools for the manufacture and repair of apparatus, and has in addition 
a 9-in. lathe, a 9-in. drill press, a circular saw and emery wheels — all 
driven by a 3-HP motor. 

Electrical power is supplied from a motor-generator set, the D. C. 
voltage being controlled by a Tirrill Regulator insuring steady voltage 
for laboratory work. It has in addition a 220-volt A. C. supply, and 
50 volts from a storage battery. The distributing board is equipped 
with auto-transformers and special rheostats making it possible to dis- 
tribute various kinds of power to each laboratory in the department. 
The department is also equipped with apparatus for advanced work 
in light and heat. 

Under chapter 16, Acts of West Virginia, 1915, the director of 
the physical laboratory of the West Virginia University is Assistant 
Commissioner of Weights and Measures in the State of West Vir- 
ginia. The physical laboratory is therefore the State Standardizing 
Laboratory for Weights and Measures and is provided with all the 
necessary standard weights, measures, balances and apparatus for 
carrying on this work. 

The University Library has on file the current numbers of most 
of the standard journals of physics. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORIES. 

The rooms assigned to the department of chemistry consist of 
three lecture rooms, two recitation rooms, six large laboratories, and 
one smaller laboratory. Connected with these are two weighing 
rooms and two preparation rooms. The laboratories afford working 
space for two hundred students at a time and are supplied with water, 
compressed air, gas, chemicals and apparatus necessary for practical 
work. This apparatus includes a large number of pieces used in illus- 
trating the elementary principles of the science, as well as the more 
expensive instruments used in analytical work. A collection of the 
latest reference and text books is kept within easy reach of the stu- 
dents. 

In addition to the ordinary apparatus, combustion furnaces, gas 



I rENEB \l. An tfOl W EMENT8 

and electric tube fun: app.ua 1 . 

Berthelot bomb calorimeter, a spectrow D be 

issued to the students from the stuck room when their work demands 
them. 

MUSEUM OF GEOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY. 

The equipment for the purpose of illustrative teachu 
paleontology and mineralo sists of many thousand 

casts and models, a good collection of minerals, specimens of all the 
Important building Btones, and Ward's College Collection in Pal< 
tology, Bhowing the advancement from the early forms of lift 
those of the ; Ime. Collections o ind roaalls Illustrating 

the geology of thi are being constantly gathered by the v 

Virginia Geological Survey and arc placed In tin keeping of the Uni- 
versity, where i hey are available for study. The University is >itu- 
I in the midst of a great coal mining region, within five mil. 

the westernmost fold of the Appalachian mountains, and oil and 
wells are but a short distance away. Thp natural facilities for the 
study of geology are unsurpassed. 

THE ZOOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

The laboratories devoted to the work of zoology and embryology 
occupy a part of the third floor of Woodburn Hall. The plumbing, 
lighting, etc.. of these rooms are arranged for the special purpose for 
which the rooms are used. The lecture room is supplied with pro- 
tion lantern, wall charts, etc. The laboratoi with 

high grade microscopes, microtomes, paraffine bath, incubator, and 
all the other necessary apparatus for general class work. One I 
is fitted up as a shop and general preparation room. A part of this 
room has been partitioned off to form a dark-room. A large redu< 
and enlarging camera ami a BaUSCfa and Lomb micro-projection and 
photographic apparatus make all kinds of photographic work possible 
A type collection of animals is gradually being in< the 

work in embryology varfoii r*s wax mod, -is. embi 

whole and sectioned, dissections, chart- provided. The bound 

zoological publications and a few of the most frequently 
erence books are kept in the laboratory for COnvi 

THE BOTANICAL LABORATORIES. 

The botanical laboratories are in the agricultural Building. They 

are equipped with micro-. dl-immersion ting 

lenses, camera lucidas. microtome.- water baths, paraffine OVens, in- 
cubators, sterilizers, autoclave, and some apparan:> tor plant ph 
besides the usual 



-6 West Virginia University Catalogue 

educational and educational psychology laboratory. 

The equipment for use in laboratory work in connection with 
courses in education and educational psychology is found in rooms 
16 and 17, Woodburn Hall. The apparatus and materials provide a 
considerable range for measuring, testing and demonstration, such 
as the Montessori didactic apparatus, Binet-Simon measuring scale, 
audiometer, dynamometer, color mixer, form board, Galton whistle, 
mercury apparatus, tracing and tapping boards, tunning forks, tachisto- 
scope, trial set of lenses for testing the eyes, weight boxes, etc. 

OTHER LABORATORIES. 

A more detailed description of the various engineering and agri- 
cultural laboratories as well as the laboratories of the School of Medi- 
cine will be found in connection with the announcements of these de- 
partments on later pages of this catalogue. 

MILITARY TRAINING. 

Military training is prescribed for all regular students in the 
University below the rank of junior unless such students are 
more than* twenty-three years of age upon their entrance to the Uni- 
versity. Certain exceptions to this requirement are stated in full in 
the detailed announcements of the Division of Military Science. 

Students who secure appointments as state cadets are exempt 
from the payment of tuition or matriculation fees and are at no ex- 
pense for use of text books. Enrollment in the Division of Military 
Science or appointment as a state cadet does not render the student 
liable for military service either to the State or to the United States 
government. 

A unit of the Reserve Officers Training Corps was established at 
the University in 1916. During the first semester of 1918-19 Section A 
(Academic) and Section B (Vocational) of the Students Army Training 
Corps took the place of the previous organization. The Reserve Offi- 
cers Training Corps was reinstituted at the beginning of the second 
semester. 

ATHLETICS. 

The department of athletics, as now organized, is under the super- 
vision of a director. Football, baseball, basketball, track and tennis 
teams are organized and trained each season. All University ath- 
letics are under the control of the athletic board. This board is com- 
posed of the director of athletics, two other members of the Uni- 
versity faculty, two alumni of the University, and two students. 

The faculty members of the board are appointed by the President 
of the University and serve during his pleasure. One member is 



NEBAL A: 



board. He is the execut. 
the board and has no mtc ^xc^pt in case of a 

- 
their annual : t comm- 1 term not exceeding 

year- more than one alumni member shall be a resider.- 

Monor. - 

members of the board are elected by the student 
body by ballot. One men ill standing in the junior class, a 

candidate for a : elected - *.*o years at a poll 1 

not later thai each year. All details of these elections 

are b ■ Council in consultation with the 

Athletic Eligib- 

candidates for I 
athletic teams ar^ ulty. The Unrrersity 

is a member of the] AssociaUon. 

to participa- rcol- 

- 
a. No 

e a can: as participated in 

four previous yea 

a candidate for a bachelor's degree, has 
participated in any dep;.\- for any 

other college or shall represent thifl r daring the 

follow i 

3. No student who is not regularly registered and a candidate for 
a b 

minimum amount of work in the college in which he is enrolled, shall 
be eligible to participa branch of intercollegiate athletics. 

ho enrolls later than two weeks after the ope n 

ate in any branch of 
intercolle- 

- who play -Summer Baseball" befcr I or after 

year or play at any time under the govern- 
ment of the National Baseball Agreement, shall be debarred from 
competition in any branch 

who does not maintain at all times a general average of at least 7* 
per i scholastic work. 

mber 1. 151? 
have participate i contests on Bethany Col- 

lege or f -respect ire of whether 

or: it either of 



28 West Virginia University Catalogue 

institutions at the time of this participation will have such participa- 
tion counted against them as provided in Rules 1 and 2 above. 

MEDICAL SERVICE. 

All men students in the University pay a medical fee of $2.00 each 
per semester, in return for which they receive free drug service from 
the department of pharmacy of the University, and free medical at- 
tention, including minor surgery (specialties excepted) from the fac- 
ulty of the School of Medicine. 

Students wishing to avail themselves of the dispensary will re- 
port at the dean's office in the Medical Building where a physician 
will be on duty from 10 to 12 a. m. and from 2 to 5 p. m. daily, and 
Saturday morning from 10 to 12. It is expected that students shall 
obtain these services at the dispensary, unless they are unable to 
leave their rooms, when a physician will attend them at their resi- 
dences. Students unable to leave their rooms can obtain such serv- 
ices by telephoning to the Medical Building (No. 444) during office 
hours, or to the dean at his home (No. 244-J). 

Summer School students and those coming in for only one class, 
or some special class, are exempted from the payment of the medical 
fee if they so desire. 



\KK.\I. ANNOI Si BMJ N i - 
UNIVERSITY FEES AND EXPENSES. 

GENERAL FEES. 

in the College of Arts and Sciences, the College ol Engineering 

and in the College of Agriculture tuition 

students. For Btndente not residents* of West Virginia the tuition 

$30.00 for the semester, or $50.00 for the few if paid in 
advance. 

In the C Law and the School Be the tuition 

are $15.00 a semester, or $25. on a year, for resident students, and 

$30.00 a semester, or $•"> I ■ year If paid in advance, for non • 

denl Btudi 

The matriculation fee is $6.00, payable upon entering the Univer- 
sity, hy all student ind those whose work la exelusli 
in music. 

The contingent fee is $3.00 a semester, payable by all students 
except cadets and those whose work is exclusively in music. 

The athletic fee is $2.50 a semester, payable by all stud 
cept those whose work is exclusively in music. 

The medical fee is $2 00 :\ payable by all male Btud< 

A fee of $2.00 each semester is charged foi registration and the 
issuance of class cards. As a reward for prompt rceistration this 
fee is remitted to all students who procure class cards during the 
first three days of the first semester, and the first two days of the 
second semester. Students whose work is exclusively in music are 
excused from payment of the $2.00 registration fee. 

Class officers will :ssu>- class cards only on presentation of the 
receipt for the above fees, signed by the registrar and the financial 
secretary. 

SPECIAL FEES. 

The diploma fee is 15.00, payable by all students at the beginning 
of the semester in which they expect to receive their degree or 
diploma. 

A fee of $1.00 is charged for furnishing a copy of a student's 
record in the registrar's office after the regular semester reports h 
been issued. 

Students in laboratory courses paj special !>■>■< to OOTUfl th< 
of materials used. The amount of the .ted in the annour 

ment of the course. 



•1 to be !• it the time «.f their 

ration their parents «»r guardians have been residpnts and citir 
the State for at least 

dence entitling him to r» - exemption from tuition merely hv his 

attendnn.-e at the University. — Order of the 



30 West Virginia University Catalogue 

refunding of tuition and fees. 

Students who withdraw from the University for good and suffi- 
cient reasons during the first two weeks of the semester, will have 
their tuition refunded upon making application to the President, but 
matriculation, contingent, athletic and registration fees will not be 
refunded. 

Students who have paid tuition for the year and who for any 
reason cannot attend during the second semester, may have the excess 
paid above the amount of one semester's tuition refunded, upon ap- 
plication. 

Students who receive appointment as state cadets after the pay- 
ment of tuition and fees, but before the first nine weeks of the sem- 
ester have elapsed, may have refunded to them all tuition and fees 
not properly chargeable to state cadets. 

COST OF A YEAR'S WORK. 

Board and lodging may be obtained in Morgantown for from 
$5.00 to $6.00 a week. Furnished rooms may be obtained at from 
$1.50 to $2.00 a week with two in a room. Board in private families 
or in students' boarding clubs costs from $5.00 to $6.00 a week. A 
student's washing will cost usually from $10.00 to $18.00 a year, his 
textbooks from $8.00 to $30.00 a year, and his contingent and athletic 
fees from $6.00 to $11.00 a year. To these fixed charges must also 
be added matriculation, tuition, diploma, and laboratory fees, in the 
case of students who are required to pay them. Travelling expenses 
clothing, and miscellaneous expenses will depend largely upon the 
tastes and habits of the individual. In general it may be said that 
the legitimate cost of a nine months' term of residence at the Univer- 
sity ranges from $300.00 to $400.00, exclusive of traveling expenses. 



ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY. 

METHODS OF ADMISSION. 

Bitted to the I 

on certificate from u 1. In Uh 

case the certificate must set forth the work of lent in detail. 

Diplomas or certificates of a general nature will not dp accepted. 

Candidates for ■ to the 1 

teen years or nt certificates of pood mc- 

acter and, if from other colleges or un 
of honorable d 

Candidates for admission who do not p: —ance cei 

or who come from other institutions of learning witho 
honorabl -« retion of th> r, be allowed 

to register provisionally. In every such case the registrar w : l! make im- 
mediate inquiry of the institution from which the applicant comes and 
if satisfactory certificates of credits and good standing: can not be 
obtained the registration will be cancelled and the fees paid by the 
applicant will be returned. A provisional respiration will not ( 
narily be continued for a longer period than one month. 

ENTRANCE CREDITS. 

The requirements for admission to the various colleges of the 
University are stated in terms of u: 

:nit in any subject represents the amount of work that may 
be done in a standard high school in a year of thirty-six weeks, with 
five recitation periods of forty-two minutes each, per week. In co . 
where laboratory work is required, from two to three hours of labora- 
tory work (a considered the equivalent of one hour recitation, ac- 
cording to the amount of preparation required in connection 
with such work. 

of entrance credits must be on the blank form pre- 
scribed by the Committee on Classification and G 
form, so that credit values, in units, may be readily computl ' T 
certificates should be sent in to the registrar at least two *eeks be- 
fore the applicant pr If for matriculati. re to do 
this may result in vexatious delay in registration. After the c 
has been considered by the Committee on Entrance and the rr> 
recorded, it is permanently fiW. in the r*s office and becomes 
the property of the Unive' 



32 West Virginia University Catalogue 

special students. 

Persons who do not desire to become candidates for a degree, 
may, by permission of the Committee on Entrance and of the faculty 
or dean of the college which they wish to enter, be admitted as special 
students, subject to the following provisions: 

1. Special students must as a rule be twenty-one years of age 01 
over (twenty-two in the College of Law). 

2. Special students must satisfy at least nine units of the re- 
quirements for admission, including two units of English. (For aca- 
demic requirements for admission as special students in the College 
of Law see the announcements of that college in another part of this 
catalogue.) 

3. Every application for admission as a special student must be 
in writing, and must set forth fully the applicant's reason, together 
with a detailed statement of the studies he desires to pursue. 

4. Special students are subjected in all respects to the usual rules 
relating to registration and scholarship. They may be assigned to 
classes for which they apply, it being understood, however, that ad- 
mission to any class rests entirely with the instructor in charge and 
further, that admission to any class when so granted does not neces- 
sarily imply credit for prerequisites. 

5. Special students shall not have their work certified for credit 
to any other institution, but a general statement of work done may be 
given if applied for; in every case this statement shall show that the 
work was done under registration as a special student, and in case the 
full requirements for admission to the University have not been satis- 
fied, the statement shall set forth the fact. 

CONDITIONAL ADMISSION. 

Persons who lack not more than two units of the regular entrance 
requirements of any college in the University may register as condi- 
tioned freshmen or first year men in that college. 

ADVANCED STANDING. 

Applications for advanced standing on account of work of college 
grade done before entrance to the University should be made to the 
registrar not later than two weeks after the applicant's matriculation. 
Certificates of college credits must be presented on a separate form 
from the entrance credits. 

If no certificates are offered or if those offered are considered by 
the Commmittee on Entrance to be irregular or insufficient, the com- 
mittee will confer with the heads of the departments concerned and 
if necessary arrange for an examination of the applicant. In this 
case the dean of the proper college will issue an examination card 
on which after examination the head of each department will report 
to the Committee on Entrance the numbers, names, and credit values 
of the courses, if any, for which the applicant is entitled to credit. 



\i:k\i. ANN01 NCEMENT8 

When the amount of advanced credit baa been approved by the 
Committee on Entrance the certificate! and examination i 
filed by the registrar. 

REGISTRATION. 

Every student who registers at West Virginia University must 
till out a student's registration blank at the office ot the registrar 
in Woodburn Hall or at the office ot the dean of the college b< 
to enter. Cadets should present themselves to the commandant in 

the Armory before coming to the registraj The blank 

women students must be filled out in the Women's Parlor and approv- 
ed by the dean of women. 

This registration blank is then presented to the registrar, who 

will issue in return a card stating the amount ot io paid, the 

College which the student is to enter, and the name of the Clai 
or adviser. 

The fees as indicated on this card must then he paid to the 
financial secretary at his office in Sri. nee Hall. H pi is 

stamped on the card. 

The receipted card is then presented to the class officer d< 
nated, who will take it up. assign the student to his proper clas 
prepare a study list and issim class cards admitting to these clas 

These Class cards are then taken to the proper instructors, who 
will take them up. sign the study list, and enroll the student in theil 
Classes. Cadets should obtain from the commandant in the Armory 
a blank requisition for text DOOKS, which blank is to be Oiled OUt 
the various Instructors ami then pi • th< bookstore in Martin 

Hall. 

Finally the Btudy list. prop, rh signed by all instructors, mm 
returned to the • cer, who will then Issue to the student a 

membership card, the possession of which entitles him to th< 
the library, athletic privileges, and other rights and privilege! 
University student. Registration is not completed until this card bai 
obtained. 

All students are required to register at the beginning ot . 



34 West Virginia University Catalogue 

CLASSIFICATION AND SCHOLARSHIP. 

THE CLASS OFFICER. 

The duties of the class officer are as follows: 

1. To assign the student to proper courses, and see tLat pre- 
scribed work is taken in order. 

2. To supervise the selection of elective courses by the student. 

3. To keep a record of the work done by the student and to recom- 
mend him to the dean of his college for his degree or diploma upon 
the completion of the work required for it. Not later than January 
1 in each year the class officer must make to his dean a provisional 
recommendation for graduation of each student who expects to com- 
plete his work by the following commencement day. This provisional 
recommendation is to be accompanied by a report of the work already 
completed and by a schedule of the courses planned for the remainder 
of the year. 

4. To have general oversight of the student's college life. The 
student will look to his class officer for advice and guidance in all 
matters pertaining to his work. Withdrawal from classes, changing 
from one class to another, etc., will always require the class officer's 
consent. 

CREDITS. 

A credit or semester-hour represents the amount of work done 
in one semester (eighteen weeks), in one recitation hour with two 
preparation hours a week. From two to three hours of laboratory 
work is considered equivalent to an hour of recitation, according to 
the amount of outside work assigned in connection with the laboratory 
hours. 

Fewer than ten hours in an ancient or modern language will not 
be counted toward any University degree, diploma or certificate. 

CLASSIFICATION. 

No student shall be classified as a freshman or first year stu- 
dent who is conditioned in more than two units of entrance re- 
quirements. 

The number of courses required for classifiation as a sophomore 
or second year, junior or third year, and senior or fourth year student 
varies in the different colleges. (See announcements of the colleges 
in subsequent pages.) 

First-year students in the School of Medicine, who have completed 
two years of academic work, have the rank of juniors. 

First-year students in the College of Law, who have completed one 
year of academic work, have the rank of sophomores. 



I ii \i.i;\i. A\.\"i NCEMENT8 

Classification of students tor publication In the catalogue will 
be made on the basis of the work to their credit on November I 
each year, except In the case of studen og later In the ;• • 

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM WORK. 

A maximum and minimum number of (.our- for which ■ Btndenl 
may register in any one b established for eacl A 

student desiring to do Irregular work, more or less than U b«-<i 

number of hours ffi any college, must obtain - on from the 

committee on students' courses and hours in thai coll< 

Registration for more than the Bpecined maximum work shall 
be permitted only for the removal of conditions or better adjustment 
of schedules and not In any case for the purp< Ling the 

time regularly required for the work of the d< by the 

student. 

SUBSTITUTION FOR REQUIRED COURSES. 

A Btudent who desires to substitute another course In place of 
any < on ribed in his curriculum or required for the de. 

toward which he is working, must obtain permission for such sub- 
stitution from the committee On students' courses and hours in his 
college, but there can be no substitution from group to '--roup. V^v 
list of groups Ti». 

CHANGES IN REGISTRATION 

The permission of both class officer and instructor shall in all 

SS be necessary for the withdrawal of a student from any clasfl 

or for his transfer from one class to another. After the first six 

ks of the Bemester have elapsed the permission of the commit 
on students' courses and hours in the college concerned must also it- 
obtained. If a Btndenl disoontinui bis 
Standing in that course is reported to the registrar as zero. 

A change from one major subject to another in the same college 
will require the consent of the committee on - and 

hours in that college. 

students may be transferred from <>• >ther with 

the approval of the deans of the !• in all < 

such -indents must meet the requirements of the curriculum of 
College entered. 

No permission to do irregular work more or less than 
scribed number of hours, to maki itions for required work, 

or to make any chance of registration Is \alid until 



36 West Virginia University Catalogue 

such permit has been reported to the Committee on Classification 
and Grades for approval and record or until notice of the action taken 
has been given to the student either by his class officer or by the 
secretary of the committee. 



WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY. 

A student desiring to withdraw from the University must apply 
to the President, or, in his absence, to the registrar, for permission. 
When the withdrawal permit has been secured it must be presented 
by the student to his class officer, who will forward it to the reg- 
istrar. Students who withdraw from the University without permis- 
sion will have their grades reported as zero at the end of semester 
and will then be liable to indefinite suspension. 



ABSENCES. 

Students are required to be present at every recitation and ex- 
amination of the courses for which they are registered. Punctuality, 
regular attendance, and attention to the work of the class room will 
be largely considered in determining the class grade of the student. 

Students who find it necessary to be absent from Morgantown 
while the University is in session must secure permission, in advance 
from the President, or, in his absence, from the registrar. 

Cadets who wish a leave of absence from duty or who desire to 
withdraw from the University temporarily during their term of en- 
listment must apply to the commandant for a furlough. 

At the close each day all absences are reported by the in- 
structors to the registrar. Special absence report cards are used for 
this purpose. All excuses for absence should be made to the registrar 
within five days after the absence occurs. Women students, before 
going to the registrar, should first present their excuses to the dean 
of women. In cases of illness a certificate from the University Dis- 
pensary physician or other practicing physician of the city is required. 
Every unexpected absence effects a reduction of one per cent, in the 
student's final grade for the course. 

In case of absences at the beginning of either semester a deduc- 
tion of two per cent, from the final grade in every subject is made 
for each exercise missed, for all absences not more than seven in 
number, unless such absences are excused by the Committee on Class- 
ification and Grades. If the absences are more than seven in number 
full credit for the course is not given, unless such absences are ex- 
cused by the committee and the work missed made up to the satisfac- 
tion of the instructor. Excuses for such absences must be presented 
to the committee on special blanks furnished for that purpose. 



RAL A\ 



EXAMINATIONS AND GRADES. 






Method of Grading. In practically all th€ course.- offered in the 

University the student r> • liminary or iui<l * 

gTade and a final grade. According 
100$ li regarded as ■ pi 

The mid-semester Standing of the student on the daily I 

tation gradefl and on a special BO during on.- or ' liar 

recitation periods. ICid-eemester grades an on the n 

trar's record. The final -: baaed on the class standing 

entire semester and on a written final examination to which I Bp 
period of two or three hours if The 1; n each 

ester is given up to these final examinations. 

Absence from Examination. If the student attends the < 
throughout U iter and is absent from examination without 

mission, the instructor shall count the examination as zero, ami 
port the final grade as one-half the recitation erade. If the student 

hsent from examination for reasons satisfactory to the instruc- 
tor and has a recitation grade of eighty-five or over, the instructor 
may report the recitation grade as the final grade in the subject. If 
the recitation grade is under eighty-five, and the abseno - ttis- 

factory reasons, the fact will be recorded on the card returned to 
(lass officer, and the student may on application to the :cer 

obtain permission to take the examination at a later time. 

Reports. Instructors must report all - i the proper I 

officers on the class cards presented by the students at their entrance 
to the course. Ifid-semester grades must be reported on or before 
the "Day for Mid-semester Reports." as announced in the calendar. 
Fin, (lor the students in each course must be reported within 

two days after the close of the final examination in that course. In 
no case should instructors report a grade ai r hold it 

over to a later time. Each class card except in cases of si 

n'nation as provided above, must bear a definite percental 
The class officers will enter thes»- grades on their reports and pre* 
the latter to the registrar not later than the Monday following- 
close of the m -r or final examination period. 

A' the mid-.- report period the cer should return 

the class cards to the various instructors Immediately after recording 
the grades. After the final reported and re* 

the end of the semester t! • Fflcer should retain th< 

in his files for at least four rears before destroying them. 

Conditions and Failures. If the final ident for 

any course is below sixty, it shall be record- and the 

student must take the course asain if ! - credit for it. If the 

final erade is sixty or over, but h ihall be r 



38 West Virginia University Catalogue 

as a "condition," and the student shall have the privilege of a second 
examination. Request for such a second examination must be made 
to the instructor not later than ten days after the opening of the 
succeeding semester and the examination must be taken at the time 
designated by him. A condition not removed within the semester 
following the one in which it was imposed becomes a failure. If the 
final grade after a second examination is again below seventy, it shall 
be recorded as a "failure." 

Reports to Parents. A report of each student's work is made at 
the close of each semester, either to the student himself or to his 
parent or guardian. A complete record is "also kept in the registrar's 
office. The fee for making a copy of this record after the semester 
reports have been sent out is one dollar. 

In case where a student's work is unsatisfactory as shown by 
the mid-semester test, a mid-semester report will also be made both 
to the parent or guardian and to the student. 



SUSPENSIONS. 

Any student whose standing, in courses amounting to at least 
half of the total number of semester hours for which he is registered, 
is not seventy per cent, or more and whose average stand- 
ing is not at least sixty per cent, in all of his courses for any sem- 
ester is suspended from the University for the succeeding semester. 
If, however, the failure as above is due to the abandonment of any 
class, or to withdrawal from the University without permission, or to 
absence from examination without reasonable excuse, the suspen- 
sion becomes indefinite. If a student suspended for any semester by 
the operation of this rule re-enters the University and again becomes 
subject to it, his suspension becomes indefinite. 

Any student whose average standing in all studies as shown by 
the preliminary or mid-semester report is less than fifty per cent, will 
be suspended from the University for the remainder of the semester. 

WORK DONE OUT OF RESIDENCE. 

The doing of work out of residence is discouraged. In case of 
courses begun at the University and not completed by reason of ill- 
ness or otherwise, however, permission to complete the w r ork in ab- 
sentia under the direction of the regular University instructors may 
be granted by the Committee on Classification and Grades; but in 
such cases credit shall be given only upon report of a grade of not 
less than eighty per cent, on final examination. 



DEGREES 

All University d< i ed by the & 

pents upon recommendation of the University faculty. 

granted only once in each year at the annual University comm- I 

ment. 

The names of all Btadentfl who are to app< for 

decrees in any year must b*> presented by their re.-;. <>ffi- 

to the dean of tin than January 1. All 

who intend to present th< candidates for degree in any 

:• should as a rule, therefore, cive notice of their Intention to their 
ifUcera not later than December 1. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES. 

The University confers the following baccalaureate 
Bachelor of Arts (A3.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of 
Science in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.M.E.), Bachelor o e in 

Chemical Engineering (B.S.Chem 1 fdor of Science in Civil 

Engineering - '.), Bachelor of Sck-nrp in Electrical En^i; 

in? (B.S.E.E.). Bachelor of Science in El - of M 

(B.S.E.M.). Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B.S.Agr.), Bachelor 
of Science in Home Economics | . and Bachelor of I. 

(LL.B.). 

Students who come to the University from other colleges or uni- 
fies are advised to make the transfer not later than the becinnim: 
of the junior year and in no casp will a student who matriculates in 
the University later than October 1 in any ypar be per i receive 

ree at the next commencement. 

In special <-;•.- nts who desire to leave the University at the 

36 of the juni< mother institution with the pur 

of taking a combined course leading to two degrees or of pi 
for graduate study may. upon application beforeh be Com- 

mittee of Classification and Oi •}).■ work of 

the senior year, or a part then ich other institution and to re- 

ceive the bachel i e from the University upon sta- 

tion of the proper cred 

In no case, however, will a Btudenl from the 

University who has I either a total of ninety hours of his 

work or the last thirty hours of it in actual : at the 

Bity. 



40 WEST Virginia I'niykrsity CATALOGUE 

GRADUATE DEGREES. 

The University does not confer the degree, Doctor of Philosophy, 
but will certify to other institutions such graduate work as may be 
applicable toward this degree. 

The University confers the following master's degrees: Master 
of Arts (A.M.), Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Science in Me- 
chanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.), Master of Science in Civil Engineer- 
ing (M.S.C.E.), Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (M.S.E.E.), 
Master of Science in Engineering of Mines (M.S.E.M.), and Master of 
Science in Agriculture (M.S.Agr.). A master's degree is conferred 
upon the following conditions: 

Candidacy. 

1. A candidate for a master's degree must hold a bachelor's de- 
gree from West Virginia University or from another institution in 
which the requirements are substantially equivalent. He must have 
completed all the essential requirements for the bachelor's degree 
corresponding to the master's degree for which he applies. 

2. The applicant must also inform the Committee on Graduate 
work of his choice of a major subject anl submit a general outline 
of his proposed course of study. The subject chosen must be either 
the same as the undergraduate major or one in which the candidate 
has an equivalent undergraduate preparation. (See page 69.) 

Those who wish to become candidates but lack undergraduate 
preparation will be admitted to graduate study, but must at once make 
up their deficiencies by taking the necessary undergraduate courses. 
On completion of such undergraduate courses they become eligible 
to candidacy. 

Those who have received their bachelor's degree and wish to 
broaden their education without reference to a higher degree, will be 
admitted to graduate study without restriction as to courses. 

Seniors in the colleges of West Virginia University who have 
completed the work for the bachelor's degree but who have not yet 
received the degree, may have work credited toward the master's de- 
gree at the discretion of the Committee on Graduate Work. 

NOTE — Students desiring to be admitted as candidates for a 
master's degree are advised to make application either in person or 
by letter to the chairman of the Committee on Graduate Work some 
weeks prior to the opening of the semester in which they wish to 
begin their work. Blank forms can be obtained on application. 



tfERAL AKN01 n< (MINT- 41 

The Special Sub-Committee. 

if the Btudenl Is accepted or the ma 

the Committee on Graduate Work will appoint i special nib-committee 
of thi • • Including the professors in charge of the work In 

- major ami related subjects, whoa shall b»- 

(a) to arrange a specific course ol study; (b) 

mine ami pass upon the theflfs should (>!:• 

di) to conduct the final examination. 

Requirements for the Degree. 

1. Term of Residence. A Candidal todies in 

dence at the I'niversity for ar least two : or for one 

regular semester ami eighteen m endance a1 rammer sessions. 

I Course of Study. The candidate must present thirty-two hours 
duate work, which at tin- discretion of the department in which 
he has chosen his major subject may or may not include a thesis. 
At least ten hours, exclusive of thesis, shall be in the candidate's 
major subject and any remaining hours in subjects related to the major 
subject. Courses primarily designated for graduate Students and dis- 
tinctly senior courses open to graduates, are indicated in the cata- 
logue, but other advanced courses and special research COUT84 
listed in the catalogue may be credited with the approval of the 
Committee on Graduate Work. In some instant > under- 

graduate courses, not regularly open to grad : ;■ !>»• ap] 

for graduate work with reduced credit; but elementary COV 
credited. 

No work done before the completion of the work required for the 
bachelor's degree will be credited toward the mat ree unless 

the work has been regularly approved by the committee. 

The specific course of study must be presented to the Comn 
on Graduate Work for its approval within two weeks after the I 
ance of the student's application. 

NOTE— Since the principal aim of graduate study is the de\elop- 
ment of the knowledge QQCQSDSn to do Independent work and the 
promotion of the spirit of research, each Candida:.- for I 
expected to have a wide knowledge of his subject and 
of work and to pin- ! reading and study in add! 

tion to his Cniversity work. 



42 West Virginia University Catalogue 

3. Thesis. A statement of the general subject of the thesis, with 
the written approval of the chairman of the special committee, must 
be furnished to the Committee on Graduate Work within six weeks 
after the acceptance of the student's application. The thesis shall 
show acceptable investigation in the major subject. It shall be pre- 
pared under the direction of the department in which the student 
has chosen his major and shall be submitted for approval to the 
special committee at least four weeks previous to the commencement 
day at which the degree is expected. The thesis shall be presented 
in such form as may be prescribed by the Committee on Graduate 
Work. If the thesis is approved, two typewritten or printed bound 
copies shall be deposited in the University Library at least one week 
before the degree is conferred. 

4. Final Examination. The final examination of the candidates 
shall be oral and shall cover the major and related courses and thesis, 
or such part thereof as the special committee may deem desirable. 
This examination shall be open to the public and shall be held at 
least three weeks before the commencement day on which the degree 
is expected. The Committee on Graduate Work shall delegate one of 
its members to attend the examination. 

The special committee shall report their opinion of the thesis and 
the result of the examination of the candidate to the Committee on 
Graduate Work at least ten days before commencement. 

NOTE — For announcement concerning professional degrees in the 
College of Engineering, see page 157. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

DISCIPLINE. 

The rules and regulation- -erre 

are few. simple and reasonable; civil and orderly conduct; punctu- 
and regularity in attendance upon all required exercises; reasonable 
diligence in the performance of the work prescribed, and abstinence 
from drinkine. gambling and like gross v; 

Students who do not comply with ;uirements will not be 

allowed to remain in the Univer 

All matters of discipline are in charge of the Pr»- 
Uni-.- th the dean of the college or head of 

the division of the University in whicr lent concern^ 

rolled. 

The law of i makes the smoking or other use of 

rettes in school buildings or on land m -poses a 

>meanor. punishable by fine of from one to five dollars. By 
order of the Un acuity the use of tobacco ip any forr 

the students of the Un i v ersity in any of the University bui! lings 
e entrar. prohibited. 

THE CONVOCATION 

The Uni onvocation is held weekly on iom- 

inc at ten o'clock in Commencement Hall, under the direction of 
Chaplain of the T Mo classes or oth^r 

are held t thil hour, and oppor tf forded for all members 

of the University, bo- I the weekly 

meeting. The hour is occupied by lectures and addresses, discussion 

udent ir nd problems, and the consideration of ques- 

relating to the general Uni 

In connection with the weekly convocation brief devotional 

B are held. 
Director of the School of ndance is entirely volur.' 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 

The Young Mer >n is a volui rela- 

tion of college men for the purpose of promoting and directing 
d student a rom a religious mot: 

.bership is open to all men of the l": -nual 

membership 

The administrative policy is directed 1 
by the facul - ry board I to ass:- 

directing the work. The office and reading room is in Woodburn I 



44 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Weekly devotional meetings are held. Other features of the work 
are the Bible Study courses which enroll a large number of men; the 
Employment Agency; Boarding and Rooming House Directory: the 
publication of the University Directory and Handbook. All corres- 
pondence should be directed to the General Secretary. Mr. J. C. Hupp. 

Membership in the Young Women's Christian Association is open 
to all young women in the University. Regular devotional meetings 
are held weekly. 

PHI BETA KAPPA. 

The Alpha of West Virginia Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society is established at the University. Stated meetings or public 
exercises of the Society are held twice annually: The Anniversary 
meeting on December 5, and the Annual meeting during Commence- 
ment Week. The honor of membership may be conferred upon candi- 
dates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts who have maintained a high 
scholarship rank during their college course; also upon members of 
the faculty and alumni of the University, and upon distinguished 
citizens of the state. The president of the chapter for the year 1918 
is Professor Alfred Jarrett Hare; the secretary, Professor Madison 
Stathers. 

THETA PSI. 

The Theta Psi Honorary Engineering Fraternity is an organiza- 
tion to which students in the College of Engineering may be elected 
upon the attainment of certain specified high standards of scholarship 
in undergraduate courses. Elections are held each fall on the basis 
of grades attained in the work of the previous year. 

STUDENTS' ORGANIZATIONS. 

There are in the University various societies and clubs, devoted 
chiefly to the educational, social and athletic interests of the stu- 
dents. Several Greek letter fraternities and sororities have estab- 
lished chapters at the University and most of these occupy their own 
chapter houses. 

Some of the more important of the student organizations are: 

1. The Columbian Literary Society. Regular meetings every 
Friday night in its own hall in Martin Hall. -Membership open to all 
students of the University. 

2. The Parthenon Literary Society. Regular meetings every Fri- 



day night in its own hall in Martin Hall. M- p open to all 

students of th- 

3. The University Dramatic Club. The purpose of .niza- 
tion niulate an interest in literary and dramatic work in the 
University. This :> accomplished through the practical ar. 

matic study of stand - and through the public 

of at least one play in each college year. All V: 
are eligible to membership in the Dramatic Club, but U rine 

to enter must p; ;nder the direction of the pro- 

fessor of pub 

4. The Crucible. ship open to advanced students in the 
department of chemistry. Met and third Fridays of 
each month at 4 : SO p. m. 

:"he Engineering Society. Regular : tnd third 

Friday nights of each month in its room In :ine Hall. Mem- 

hip open to all rtodenu in the College of Engineering and Ma- 
rtian 

6. The University Grange, Numb- 73, Patrom p.dry. 

:lar meetings on alternate Wednesday evening! -nip open 

to all students in the College of Agriculture and to others who may 
be elected. 

" The English Club. Regular meetings on the first Thur 
night of even.- month. 

v The Beowulf-Gedriht. Regular meetings in Octoh :.ber, 

February. April and May. Open to all members of the Univer 
upon the fulfillment of certain scholarship qualificat: 

9. The Aericulti: ation. An organization of the students 
of the College of Agriculture to promote their general interests. Meet- 
Thursday of each month. 

10. The Phil-Hellenic Club. Membership open to all students of 
Greek. Regular meetings once each month. 

11. West Virginia (JniveJ ciety. Regular meet- 
on the last Friday night of every month. Membership is open 

to members of the faculty giving instruction in scientific subj> 
local investigators in scientific subjects, teach* ence in the 

public schools, and graduate -ce in attendance at 

12. Gh-e and Mandolin Clubs. Places on these clubs ar- 

all male i and are gained in the 'try-outs" in September of 

each year. An annual tour is arranged by a student manager for the 
advertisement of the University. The Director of the School of Music 
is the Musical Director. 

13. The Fni. hoir. This organization under the direction 
of the Director of the School | of about thirty 



46 West Virginia University Catalogue 

selected voices and sings in the weekly Convocation exercises. Spe- 
cial appropriate programs are presented at festival seasons. 

14. The Education Club. The purpose of the club is to develop 
and maintain a professional attitude in those who are preparing for 
education work, to study the needs of schools, and to contribute to 
the advancement of education. Regular meetings are held on the 
fourth Thursday night of each month. 

15. American Institute of Electrical Engineers. West Virginia 
University Branch. Meetings monthly. Membership open to students 
in the Department of Electrical Engineering. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS. 

The Athenaeum, a weekly college newspaper, is published by the 
Students' Publishing Association. The editorial staff of the paper 
is elected by this association at its annual meeting on the third Sat- 
urday in May. Nominations must be made from an eligible list pub- 
lished by the department of English at least two weeks before the 
annual meeting. No student will be included in the eligible list who 
has not attained the rank of sophomore or who has not made an ex- 
cellent standing in two or more courses in English composition. 

The College Annual, The Monticola, is published by the junior 
class. 

All student publications are under the supervision of a faculty 
committee on student publications. 

STUDENT SOCIAL LIFE. 

The general oversight of the social activities of the student body 
and of fraternity and sorority life in the University is placed in the 
hands of committees of the faculty. The Committee on Fraternities 
and the Committee on Sororities are constituted in accord with the 
following order of the Board of Regents. 

(1) No fraternity nor sorority, other than those now in existence 
in the University shall be established without the consent of the 
University Council of Administration. Application for this consent 
shall be made by a petition signed by all of the students interested. 

(2) No student shall be initiated into any fraternity or sorority, 
nor reside in any fraternity house, until such student has been in 
residence at the University one full semester, and has received credit 
on the records of the University for not less than twelve semester 
hours of work done in the University classes; nor shall any student 
be initiated into any fraternity or sorority, who has not full college 
standing. The requirement of one semester's residence will be waived 
in the case of a student coming into the University from any other 
university or college, and receiving advanced standing sufficient to 
give a classification of sophomore or higher. 



NEB \i. Anvm NGElf] :• 4T 

3. Each fraternity at the beginning of each scholaal »hall 

designate two of its members as a oommittee to repreeenl the 
ternity in all matters calling for conference with the President 

the University or University authorities. Bach sorority shall 1 i R ♦ - -. 

select a committee of two to represent it In such confer* 

fraternity and sorority shall certify to th< ir the DSJ • 

the members chosen for its committee within two weeks after >h«- 
opening of the fail Bemester of each year. 

(4) The President of the University Bhall appoint a m< 

the faculty as a faculty representative for each fraternity, and in 

making such appoint mem he shall COnSOll with the comm:' 

each fraternity provided for in Rule 8. He shall in like manner ap- 
point a faculty representative for each sorority. Wives of memtx 
of the faculty may be appointed by the President as facultj repre- 
sentatives of sororities. 

It shall be the duty of the faculty representative •<• keep In I 

with the life and work Of the fraternity OF sorority, and to be the 

representative of the University under the direction of the Presidenl 
in all matters that may arise between the University and the fra- 
ternity or sorority. The faculty representatives <>f fraternities shall 
constitute a general committee of the faculty on fraternities, and tie- 
faculty representatives of sororities shall constitute a like commit! 
on sororities. 

(5) No person who is not a student of the University shall be 
initiated into any fraternity or sorority without the permission of 
the University Council of Administration. 

(6) All efforts by fraternities or sororities to secure new mem- 
bers commonly known as "rushing" shall be under such regulations 
as may be agreed on by the fraternities and sororities. In the even! 
of no agreement by fraternities or sororities, such regulations shall 
be made by the faculty committee on fraternities or the faculty com- 
mittee on sororities in consultation with thp fraternity or sorority 
commit te.s. as provided in Rule ?, of this order. When approved by 
the Council of Administration such regulations shall be in full fo 
and effect. 

The social life of the students in the University is under the 
genera] supervision of the faculty Committee on Social Affairs. This 
committee has supervision of every social function Ldven by the 
University or by any organization within it. Including fraternil 
sororities and other student societies. Such social functions as balls. 
dances, picnics, exclusions and receptions are supervised by this 
committee. The committee approves all dance programs rapen 
the Issuance of invitations for functions of a general Univei 

nature and sees that all social affairs held in the University are 
properly conducted. 

in the performance of its duty the oommlttei 
following general regulations of the Board of R 

(1) Xo indoor social function shall be given by the University or 
any of its departments or organizations in any Other place than in 

University buildings. For this purpose, bos 



4V West Virginia University Catalogue 

fraternities or sororities, and the University leased dormitories shall 
be considered University buildings. 

(2) No social affairs at night, of which dancing is a feature, shall 
be permitted to continue longer than 1 a. m. and this hour is allow- 
able only in formal or "full program" affairs. Ordinary parties, 
dances, etc., must close not later than 11:30 p. m. Picnics, excur- 
sions, boat rides, etc., extending into the night, must be so arranged 
that the return to the University shall not be later than 11:30 p. m. 



WOMEN'S STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION. 

All women students of the University whose homes are not in 
Morgantown, whether they live in the Women's Hall, in sorority houses 
or in rooming houses in town, are members of the Student Government 
Association. The purpose of this association is to regulate all matters 
pertaining to the student life of its members, to further in every way 
the spirit of unity among the women of the University, to increase 
their sense of responsibility, and to be a medium for maintaining a 
high scholastic standard. 

The association has the following officers: A president and a vice- 
president elected from the senior class; a secretary elected from the 
sophomore class, and a treasurer elected from the freshman class. 
The vice-president is also house president. The four officers together 
with one representative from each sorority, the young women who 
are at the head of the sororities, an equal number of non-sorority 
members, one member from the Young Woman's Christian Associa- 
tion, and one from the freshman class constitute the executive board 
in which is vested the administration of the association. This board 
is responsible to the facuty adlvisory board of the association for all 
matters pertaining to the social life of the students. 

The advisory board consists of the dean of women and two other 
members of the faculty appointed by the President of the University. 



THE DEAN OF WOMEN. 

All the interests of the women students of the University are in 
charge of a special executive officer of the University, the dean of 
women. She is a member not only of the advisory board of the 
Student Government Association but also of the faculty Social Com- 
mittee. Thus she is cognizant of all social activities engaged in by 
women students. The dean is a resident of the Women's Hall, where 
she comes into intimate personal relation with the young women and 
has immediate supervision of their social life. 



General Annoi ngemi nts 

the women's hall. 

The rooms In the Women's Hal] accommodate 114 jronn 
the (iin | nearly 300. Miss Susan Maxwell M lean 

ot" women, Is In charge of the hall. Those desiring Information ai 

pries, hoard, or available rooms. Bhould applj to are, 

OTHER ROOMING PLACES FOR WOMEN STUDENTS. 

With the approval of the dean of women young women students 
whose parents are not residents of llorgantown and who can not find 
accommodation In the hall, may Becure rooming and boarding pi 
with private families In the town. Such students at- 
form to the usual hall rules regarding callers and hours and are 
not permitted bo change their places of residence, to be absent from 
llorgantown, or from their own rooms over night, without the | 

mission of the dean Of women. 

BOARDING AND ROOMING PLACES. 

The matter of furnishing information to new students regarding 
suitable boarding and rooming places is in charge of the Y. If. C. A 
and Y. \Y. C. A. of the University. On their arrival in llorgantown 
new students should come directly to Woodburn Hall, where they will 
find complete lists of rooms and boarding places and also upper el 
men who will help them in finding lodgings and in matriculating. 
During the opening days of the semester, committees from the two 
Christian Associations meet new students at i rains and are ready to 
render them every' assistance possible. 

Young men desiring information in advance of their arrival in 
llorgantown may address the University Y. M. C. A., llorgantown, 

\V. Ya. Young women may addn-.-s Hiss Susan M. Moor*'. Dean of 

Women. 

AID FOR STUDENTS. 

The Employment Bureau, organised by the University V If. < 

undertakes to assist earnest and worthy students who are dependent 

upon their own efforts for the expenses of their education, to obtain 
various forms of employment in Iforgantown. Prospective stud< 

desiring such aid should correspond with J. C. Hupp, Secretary of the 

Y. M. C. A., before entering the University, stating the kind of work 

desired and the nature of past experience In any occupation The 
work consists largely in waiting on table, caring for rooms and lawns, 
clerking in stores. Stenographic 



•"'" WtesT Virginia University Catalogue 

PRIZES. 

Awards for prizes in the University are made in accordance with 
the following rules: 

No composition, in whole or in part, shall be submitted in com- 
petition for two prizes. 

Only students pursuing courses leading to baccalaureate degrees 
are eligible for any prize offered. 

No student shall be eligible to enter any contest who has not 
been a resident student in this University for at least one semester 
preceding the semester in which the contest is to be held, and who 
is not a resident student in good standing in the University in the 
semester in which the contest is held. 

No successful contestant may become for a second time a com- 
petitor for the same prize. 

If in any contest the judges find no manuscript of sufficient 
merit, there shall be no award of that prize for that year. 

Students intending to compete in any essay-writing contest must 
notify the chairman of the Committee on Prizes not later than March 
15. Three typewritten copies of each essay must be in the hands of 
the chairman of the committee not later than May 15. 

The conditions upon which the awards in the several contests are 
made may be learned upon application at the President's office, or 
to the members of the Committee on Prizes: 

The more important prizes offered in the University are: 

The Bryan Prize in Political Science. 

The Hon. William J. Bryan has given a sum of money, the annual 
income of which is to be offered as a prize to the student in the 
University who shall write the best essay on some subject in the 
science of government. The amount of the prize for the pjesent is 
$15.00. 

The Tax Commission Prize. 

The members of the State Tax Commission of 1902, W. P. Hub- 
bard, Henry G. Davis, John K. Thompson, "L. J. Williams and J. H. 
Holt, have given the sum of $1,350, the income of which is to be used 
annually as a prize for the "best original work bearing on matters of 
taxation in West Virginia." The conditions of competition are deter- 
mined by the Council of Administration. The amount of the prize 
at present is $70.00. 

The Russell Love Morris Prize. 

Russell Love Morris, C. E., Professor of Civil Engineering, offers 
a prize of fifty dollars annually to the student of civil engineering 
who presents the best thesis on some subject of special application 
to the needs and resources of West Virginia. 



I 

Inter-Fraternity Scholastic Trophies. 

Arleigfa I 

r cup known as the In 

]■ lE P d at th»' end of ' 

highi 

the ; d of that fraternity during 

tanent pi 

Aaron Arkin. Professor <>f Pathol 

p cup to !'»• called the **li 1 

will be awai he end of the 

having the I cholarship standi] II 

will be in poc >rority for the following year. T 

will ■ Lanent pr 

it five tii: 

TEACHERS' BUREAU OF INFORMATION. 

The Teachers' r.ureau of Information, under the direction ol 
rtment of Education, has for its aim: 

1. To keep a record of t ; r alumni of the I'niv. 
who wish to teach, to srather information as ( 

• rial qualifications and personal fit' 
to recommend for \ ; . most likely to pi 

themselves efficient 

2. To k silar record of alumni who wish to 1 
to other posit 

3. of education and other school ol 

curi: >nd to co-operate wit! -ncies in plat 

graduates of the University. 

Stndt -commendation for p 

should t. re hours ir 

datlon for a position in a normal school or as principal 
Intendenl 

cation. 

mendation are n> Information obtained from 

and oth' : andential. No en 

for any 

on application. The followin- mmendal 

r YVinkb • 
r Hill. A nd and I 



52 West Virginia University Catalogue 

HIGH SCHOOL AND SUPERVISOR'S CERTIFICATES. 

Graduation from the University with not less than twenty semes- 
ter hours in education will secure recommendation for high school 
and for supervisor's certificates according to the following regulations: 

1. No courses in education will be counted as part of the twenty 
hours unless approved by the Department of Education. 

2. Persons who have received advanced standing in education 
must do at least ten semester hours in regular college courses. These 
courses must not repeat those taken in another school and they must 
be advanced work. 

3. Only a limited number of hours done in the summer school 
may be counted toward certification. 

4. Candidates for certification must demonstrate their fitness for 
recommendation by successful teaching in Education 10 or 22. 

5. For the supervisor's certificcate not less than five hours must 
be taken in administration and supervision. 






?ERAL A 

ACCREDITED PREPARATORY SCHOOLS. 

in accrediting w ala huh schools the Unirersitj followi 

tho classification made by th< 
, is also prof* lucaUon In the univei 

- and students of high schools recommended by him 
without examination so tar 
special reqnlreme] the particular coll* nni- 

•y which they desire to ♦•: 

High schools of the fust Cla ufficient 

work to enable their graduate! any college of th< 

ad and third i 
for the work certified, with tho oj ling, however, that no 

dent may enter any college of the University with fewer than thi: 
units credit. 

te normal schools and of all other schools 
in good Standing will receive credit for work properly certified 

The classification Of schools published by the state supervisor of 
high schools, is as folh 

CLASSIFIED HIGH SCHOOLS. 1916-17. 

HIGH SCHOOLS OF THE FIRST CLASS. 
'Alderson -Alderson Independent District, Monroe Coin 
Beekley — Town District. Raleigh County. 
Belington — Belington independent District, Harbour County. 
Benwood (Jnion District Marshall County. 
Bei -irinss — Bath District. Morgan Co. 

IfcDowell county. 
Blacksrille day District Monongalia County. 
Bluefield Beaver Pond Die Mercer County. 

aiwell Tiock District. Mercer County. 

Bridgeport Bridgeport independent District. Harrison Co. 

♦Bristol— Ten Mile District. Harrison County. 
Buckhannon— Buckhannon Independent District, Upshur Co. 
Cairo -Orant District. Ritchie County. 
Cameron— Cameron District. Marshall County 

sdo-Kenova Independent District, Wayne County. 

Charleston Charleston independent District. Kanawha I 

Charles Town — Charl a District, h County. 

mty. 
Clarksburg Clarksburg independent District. Han 

Clay— Clay County. 

Clendenin— Bier Sandy District, Kanawha I 

Ct, Wi OSter County. 
T ».. \ - District Tucker County. 

ak ^ahin Creek District. Kanawha County. 
Bdgewood, Wheeling — Triadelphis District. Ohio Count 

Klkins Klkins Independent Distr >lph County. 

Irmont— Fairmont Independent District Marion Count. 
•view Paw Paw District Marion Count 



litlonal cl 



,4 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Farmington— Lincoln District, Marion County. 

Flemington— Flemington District. Taylor Count v 

Follansbee— Cross Creek District, Brooke Co. 

Gary — Adkin District. McDowell County. 

Gassaway — Otter District, Braxton County. 

Grafton — Grafton Independent District, Taylor County. 

♦Greenbank— Greenbank District, Pocahontas County. 

Griffithsville — Duvall District, Lincoln County. 

Harpers Ferry— Harpers Ferry District. Jefferson County. 

Harrisville — Harrisville Independent District, Ritchie Co. 

Hedgesville — Hedgesville District, Berkeley County. 

Hillsboro— Little Levels District, Pocahontas County. 

Hinton— Hinton Independent District. Summers County. 

Huntington — Huntington Independent District. Cabell County. 

Jane Lew — Jane Lew Independent District, Lewis County. 

Keyser — Keyser Independent District, Mineral County. 

Kingwood — Kingwood District, Preston County 

Littleton — Clay District. Wetzel County. 

Logan — Logan District, Logan County. 

Lost Creek — Grant District. Harrison County. 

Lumberport — Eagle District. Harrison County. 

Mannington — Mannington District. Marion County. 

Marlinton — Edray District, Pocahontas County. 

Martinsburg — Martinsburg Independent District, Berkeley Co. 

Masontown — Valley District, Preston County. 

♦Matewan — Magnolia District, Mingo County. 

Matoaka — Rock District. Mercer County. 

Middlebourne — Tyler County. 

*Milton — Grant District, Cabell Count v. 

Morgantown — Morgantown Independent District, Monongalia 

County. 
Moundsville — Moundsville Independent District, Marshall Co. 
Mt. Hope — Fayettevillle District. Fayette County. 
Newburg — Lyon District. Preston County. 
New Cumberland — New Cumberland Independent District. 

Hancock County. 
•Newell — Grant District, Hancock County. 
New Martinsville— Magnolia District, Wetzel County. 
Northfork — Northfork District, McDowell County. 
Oak Hill — Fayetteville District, Fayette County. 
Parkersburg — Parkersburg Independent District, Wood Co. 
Parsons — Black Fork District. Tucker County. 
Paw Paw — Cacapon District. Morgan County. 
Pennsboro — Clay District, Ritchie County. 
Piedmont — Piedmont District, Mineral County. 
*Pine Grove — Grant District, Wetzel County. 
Point Pleasant — Point Pleasant Independent District. Mason 

County. 
Princeton — East River District. Mercer County. 
Ravenswood — Ravenswood Independent District, Jackson Co. 
Reader — Green District. Wetzel County. 
R'rrnvonrL -"Rtrhvood Independent District, Nicholas Co. 
Rivesvillt I'; 1 '." Paw District. Marion County. 



'Conditional classification. 



n 

- 

on District, Marshall Con. 

"He Independent District, Tyler Contr 

Roane Coci- 

- 

ashiwgtoe District. Pleasant.-? Cos 
Portland District. Prestos Cocz 
T wo— P sJrfaj :■--.-■--. Ti-v-r County 

Mo&ocz2l:a Coex 

-dependent District, Brooke Cosnty. 

- 

Wheettv:— v ----- ag MrprsAul District Ofcis Cfawn- 

Braxtosi Cexmty 

- - 

b«r? Independent Di- -enbrier Col 

rason Independent District, Mason Cour 

-:-'- : - 

-roe Co: 

- 

>fear District. Greemorier 

Willlsssst iamsbor* District. Greenbrier Cossrty. 



' 



" i,; West Virginia University Catalogue 

HIGH SCHOOLS OF THE THIRD CLASS. 

Barracksville — Fairmont District, Marion County. 

Bunker Hill — Mill Creek District, Berkeley County. 

Danville — Seott District, Boone County. 

Dunbar — Union District, Kanawha County. 

Dunleith — Ceredo District, Wayne County. 

Elizabeth — Elizabeth Independent District, Wirt County. 

Fairmont (East Side) — Union Independent District. Marion 
County. 

Fellowsville — Reno District, Preston County. 

Friendly — Union District, Tyler County. 

Great Cacapon — Cacapon District, Morgan County. 

Iaeger — Sandy River District, McDowell County. 

Jacksonburg — Grant District, Wetzel County. 

Kermit — Warfield District, Mingo County. 

Leetown (P. O. Kearneysville) — Middletown District, Jeffer- 
son County. 

Lenore — Hardee District, Mingo County. 

Man — Logan District, Dogan County. 

Mullens — Slab Fork District, Wyoming County. 

New Haven — Graham District, Mason County. 

Nemours — Beaver Pond District, Mercer County. 

Oceana — Oceana District, Wyoming County. 

Pineville — Center District, Wyoming County. 

Sardis — Sardis District, Harrison County. 

Simpson — Court House District, Taylor County. 

Spanishburg — Rock District. Mercer County. 

Wyatt — Eagle District, Harrison County. 

UNCLASSIFIED HIGH SCHOOLS. 

Albright — Portland District, Preston County. 
Moorefield — Moorefield District, Hardy County. 
Sabraton — Morgan District. Monongalia County. 



' 



SCOPE OF THE ENTRANCE REQUIRE' 
admission to the t 



ENGLISH. 

Grammar and Elementary English. Ko Student 
entrance credit in K: 

punctuation, grammar, senter. ire. or para- 

The student should be prepared I 

principles o: I to explain the syntactical struc- 

ture of any sentence encountered in his tea . 

book on grammar should have been completed before th> 
enters upon -chool course. For more advanced study o: 

subject and for practical review, the material pi :n the o: 

high school text-books on rhetoric may be 
should be constantly reviewed in connection with the work in com- 
on durinsr the four years b 

Rhetoric and Composition - -nice in theme w: 

and other forms of oral and written eornp ction in 

the principles of rhetoric and the for:. :orm an 

important part of each unit of En - 

should be required throughout the cour- are not abl* 1 

to express themselves in clear, correct, and idiomatic 
not be given full credit. The subject upon which the studer. 
should not be drawn exchu m literature ble por- 

tion of them should b- proper trainir. 

various forms of discourse. 

The three units in English should include the follow 

(a) One unit. Engl- sh Composition, 

through study of at least five : . ed from the 

below. The simplest narrative borh prose and p uld 

• lected. The aim of the work should be to stimulate ir.- 
good literature and to enable the student to form vivid me: 
tures and to understand fully the thought ^ 
composition work should The 



■"> s West Virginia University Catalogue 

work should include letter writing, short themes in narration and 
description, and study of paragraphing and sentence structure.* 

(b) One unit. English Classics and English Composition. Thor- 
ough study of five other English classics. The work should include 
more complex forms of fiction and narrative poetry, simpler essays, 
and at least one of Shakespeare's plays. The aim should be to 
make a study of form, structure, style, and purpose of the selec- 
tion; the author's life; relation of the selection to its age and to other 
works of similar type. The work in composition should include themes 
of moderate length in all forms of discourse; study of unity, coher- 
ence, and emphasis in sentences and paragraphs; kinds of sentences; 
diction; figures of speech. 

(c) One unit. Advanced study of Classics; Rhetoric. A thorough 
and intensive study of the form, structure, and style, of at least one 
typical example of the novel, the drama, the lyric or epic poem, and 
the essay. A study of the principles of rhetoric employing some 
good advanced high school text-book, with frequent and systematic 
theme writing, must form a part of this unit. 

(d) A fourth unit will be allowed in English done in the schools 
in which the work of high school grade is carried through four full 
years and the instructor has been especially prepared in English and 
has no work outside of that subject, provided that the work shall 
include history of literature, oral composition, and some study of good 
current literature, including magazines and newspapers. 

The following list of classics is suggested: 

For the first unit: Longfellow's Evangeline and Courtship of 
Miles Standish; Whittier's Snow Bound; Lowell's Vision of Sir Laun- 
fal; Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner; Macaulay's Lays of Anc- 
ient Rome; Goldsmith's Deserted Village; Irving's Sketch Book; Haw- 
thorne's Twice Told Tales; Franklin's Autobiography; Aldrich's Story 
of a Bad Boy; Warner's Being a Boy, A Hunting of the Deer, etc; 
Burroughs' Sharp Eyes, Birds and Bees, etc.; Dickens' Christmas 
Carol; Stevenson's Treasure Island. 

For the second unit. Stories from the Bible; Scott's Lady of the 
Lake, Marmion, Ivanhoe, Quentin Durward: George Eliot's Silas Mar- 
ner; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; Cooper's 
Last of the Mohicans, The Spy, The Pilot; Blackmore's Lorna Doone: 
Dickens' Tale of Two Cities, David Copperfield; Arnold's Sohrab and 
Rustum; Byron's Mazeppa and the Prisoner of Chillon; Shakespeare's 



* Reading of good literature outside of class and memorizing of notable 
passages in prose and verse should be required, but outside reading accom- 
panied by written reports or reviews made according to a stereotyped 
model, in place of a thorough study of assigned i lessons o ass instruction 
and discussion, will not be considered as satisfactorily fulfilling the re- 
quiremenl of any unit. 



! 

Merchant of Venice, As J It. Julia 

-on's De Co\ Thorean'i - 

n'a An Inland Voyage and Travel* with a I 

■ins CoorageoiUN 

For the third unit : 
Elio- Uarner or Koine' 

Hawthon 

■\vy V. I 

Milton's 

anil Lil Mp; 

y on Burns; Maeatilay- Essay OH 
ihington'fi 
Lincoln'- Gettj Bbm - etc. 

Supplementary list: Ono or two selections may be made foi 

; >ck: Ch- 
ill's ' Thompson'- Ali< • 

Job- vp and to Hold: Van Dyke's The Bin. and 

Other Stories; Mitchell's Hugh Wynne— Free Quaker. 

LATIN. 



(a) One unit. Such knowledge of Inflection and Bynl 

D in any good preparatory Latin Book, together with the ability 
lections from Ca< 

(b) One unit. Four books from C 

alent In Latin of equal difficulty. The ability to write simple Latin 
I on the text. 

(c) One unit. Six orations of Cicero. The ability to write simple 
Latin baaed on the text. The simpler historical references and 

fundamental facts of Latin 

(d) One un ; - - 1. with history and mythol 
anion Of I her (C) or (d) may be off 

the third unit, bin of com-' 

GREEK. 

(a) One unit. Introductory l< ammar: 
translations from the An translation info Or con- 
tinuous pi the Anab 

(b) One un .lion, the first foi: 

(c) One unit. Homer, tl • iad (om 
[1-492 to end) and the Homeric forms ami | 

ant practice in sieht translation and prose composition. 



60 West Virginia University Catalogue 

GERMAN. 

00 One unit. A thorough knowledge of elementary syntax; con- 
stant drill in pronunciation, oral translation, and composition; trans- 
lation of seventy-five to one hundred pages; advanced syntax; com- 
position thoroughout the year. 

(b) One unit. Modern prose and familiar poems, two hundred 
pages; advanced syntax; intermediate composition throughout the 
year. 

(c) One unit. Advanced prose, four hundred pages; advanced 
composition throughout the year. 

FRENCH. 

(a) One unit. (1) The essential principles of French etymology 
and syntax, and especially, a thorough knowledge of the pronoun and 
of the regular and irregular verb; (2) ability to write in French 
sentences of moderate difficulty; (3) the reading of from one hun- 
dred and fifty to two hundred pages of modern French prose; (4) 
ability to pronounce the language correctly and w^ith some fluency. 

(b) One unit. (1) Continued systematic study of French gram- 
mar, including syntax; (2) the reading of from three to four hun- 
dred pages of modern French; (3) practice in writing from dictation. 

(c) One unit. (1) Twenty pages of advanced prose composition; 
(2) at least three hundred pages of modern French prose; (3) at least 
three hundred pages of modern French plays. 



HISTORY. 

From one to three units may be offered, selected from the fol- 
lowing: 

(a) Ancient History to 800 A. D. — one unit. 

(b) Mediaeval and Modern European History — one-half to one 
unit. The amount of credit will depend upon the time given to the 
subject. 

(c) English History — One-half to one unit. The amount of credit 
will depend upon the time given. 

(d) American History, or American History and Civics — one unit. 



General Annoi nci mi nts 



61 



The itudent should be familiar with the Impa 

a dear knowledge ol the general development 
period of history which he often for credit 

a whole year thai covers the whole Held oi I history with 

book and with notes on collateral reading and prep 
tion of maps w ill be accepted as on.- unit, although it is believed that 
better results will be obtained by spending a whole year on 
history am' another year on the mediaeval and modern !>• 

American history and civics should fe • English his- 

tory, and should imi !><• ~i\. n t •• third year in the high BChOOl 

course, in case three years are given to history, ancienl history 
should be followed by English history in case mediaeval and mod 

history are not given. 

The study of civics must m>t precede the studv ol American 

history; and. if studied as a Separate branch following the course in 

American history, some advanced text such as Porman'a Advai 

Civics should he used. An outline knowledge of elementary civics. 

such as is presented in Porman'a First Lessons in Civics, or in p> 

man's Civics, is presupposed. 



MATHEMATICS. 

(a) Algebra through quadratics — one unit. The four fundamental 
operations for rational algebraic expressions; factoring, highest com- 
mon factor, lowest common multiple, complex fractions, solution of 
equations of the first degree, radicals including the extraction o< 
square root of polynomials and numbers, fractional and I 
exponents, quadratic equations, and equations containing one or n 
Quadratic equations, and problems involving the use of such equations. 

(b) Plane geometry — one unit. The completion of any standard 
text with original exercises and problems. 

(c) Algebra— one-half unit. Review of essentials followed by 
ratio and proportion, the binominal theorem for positive and integral 
exponents, arithmetical and geometrical ons. 

(d) Solid geometry — one-half unit. Properties of straight lines 
and planes, dihedral and polyhedral angles, projections, polyhedrons, 

Including prisms, pyramids, and the regular solids, cylinder! 

and spheres, spherical triangles, measurements of surfaces and soils 



62 W'kst Virginia University Catalogue 

(e) Plane trigonometry— one-half unit. Definitions and relations 
of the six trigonometrical functions as ratios, proofs of important 
Formulae, theory of logarithms and use of tables, solution of right 
and oblique plane triangles. 



SCIENCE. 

(a) Physics — one unit. Credit will be given for one year's work 
with any standard text-book, upon the presentation of a satisfactory 
note-book, covering at least thirty-two experiments. The note book 
should contain the student's own record of his laboratory experiments 
and a signed statement from his teacher that the book is the original 
record of the student's observations. Students deficient in labora- 
tory work may make up this deficiency in the University. 

(b) Chemistry — one unit. Credit will be allowed for the com- 
pletion in a satisfactory manner of any standard elementary text in 
inorganic chemistry, accompanied by individual laboratory work. A 
full year should be given to the work. 

(c) Botany — one unit. 

(d) Zoology — one unit. 

Work in either botany or zoology, to be credited, must have been 
accompanied by individual laboratory work. The exact extent of the 
work which should be done cannot be stated here, but, for the maxi- 
mum credit, it should be as much as a competent teacher, trained in 
laboratory methods, can accomplish in from one to one and one-half 
years. In estimating the time employed, two hours of laboratory 
work will be counted as the equivalent of one recitation period. It 
will be necessary for applicants to present their laboratory notes and 
drawings. 

In botany the class should cover the ground of Coulter's "A Text 
Book in Botany," or Bergen's "Foundation of Botany," or their equiva- 
lent. 

In zoology the class work should cover about what is represented 
in Kellogg's ''Elementary Zoology'' (Henry Holt), or in Parker and 
Haskell's Zoology, one-volume edition (Macmillan & Co.). The amount 
of laboratory work that should be done is somewhat less than is out- 
lined in Scheffer's manual (Blakiston). 



1 I WEB \l. ANNOl \<t.\ii 

< e ) A half :-• ai ol botany and a ball rear o! 

each accompanied by Individual laboratory work. 

(f) Physical Geography one-half unit. 

PhysiolO! alf unit. 

Credit tor one-half unit each in ph. phy and physi 

Uowed ;.< elective onlj If tai 

ool. Tin 
s!an,!: ' hould be supplemented by proper Illustrative 

and pr, ervaUon. On lhi( . ( T 



DRAWING. , 

re entrance credit in free band drawing In- 
Btruction should have been designed to m in ,,ii 

:iml accurate conception of form, light, and shade, and the ability 

Blmply and directly, such objects as natural and trlcal 

form, still life, architectural details, and casts from n,- - ln . 

tlque, and life. 

The training of the i 7e wj,„ understanding rather 

than the teaching of any particular method Of • , n should 

Mm of the Instructor, x,, mechanical aids should be emplo 

l-ncil is recommended as the simplest and 
dium for elementary work, it is d< ,,- n .. 

lil tor drawing shall submit their work in addition to 
cert if':. 



VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS. 

(Including Agrici] . hoW 

• d Manual Training.) 

One to three units. .\r present no rery specific requiren* 
d for preparation in these subjects • rv school 

approval of work from any school for admission to th< 

will be conditioned upon the satisfactory training and 

th < the BUbJed and upon the ad< hool 

equipment 



• ; ' West Virginia University Catalogue 

The work in agriculture should comprise a study of soils, plants, 
e crops, grains, farm animals, feeding, fruit growing, gardening, 
Insects, diseases, etc., with laboratory and field work. Texts ol a 
secondary grade such as Warren's "Elements of Agriculture, '' "High 
School Agriculture'' by Mayme and Hatch, or "Agriculture through 
the Laboratory and School Garden'' by Jackson and Daugherty, or 
books of equal grade should be used. Examinations are based on 
texts of this character, and credit will not be given for work done 
with similar texts designed for grammar school work. 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS 
AND SCIENCES 



THE FACULTY. 



PRANK BUTLEB TROTTER, LL I).. President 

JAMES MORTON callahax. Ph.D., Dean and Professor of J //«foni 

and Politii <i! fi 

DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON, LL 1 1 . President and Prof< i 

Philosophy. Enu ritus 

JAMES SCOTT STEWART, B B . P Mathematics, Enu 

ROBERT WILLIAM DODTHAT, Ph.D.. Prof* toot of Latin, EmerUus 
ALEXANDER RKIP WHITEHILL, Ph.D., P 

SAMUEL BOARDMAN BROWN, A.M.. Professor of Geology at 
Mim rata 

ROfeERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, LED., of th, English 

Languagi and LiU rature 
ALFRED JARRETT HARK. am. Pro) | the Latin Lang 

and LiU rature 
FREDERICK wilson TIU'SCOTT. Ph.D.. Professor 

Langnagx i and Hit ratun 
JOHN LEWIS SHELDON, Ph.D.. r >„,,,, 

JASPER NEWTON DEAHL, Ph.D.. / 0/ E ducation 

JOHN HARRINGTON OOX, AM. U Phjlolofr^ 

JOHN ARNDT KILSLAND. Phil p 
ALBERT MOORE REESE, Vn D logy 

OLIVER PERRY CHTTWOOD, l'„ D. Pro; ff«fopeo« Hit for* 

C EDMUND NLIL. \ i: ; Pgolfc floeofcfc 

CHAUNCET William WAGGONER, Ph.D., /',v 
mai.ison STATHBR6, P.. D. Pro . l,,,,^, 

WAITMAN P.ARP.K. l.i i D. p 9/, im o 

ENOCH Howard vickkrs. am Econon 

ologv 

LLovi) LOWNDES PRIEND, a M . Professor of Secondary Edueat 

- 



66 West Virginia Tniversity Catalogue 

CHARLES EDWARD BISHOP, Ph.D., Professor of the Greek Language 

and Literature 
JOSEPH ELLIS HODGSON, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 
FRIEND EBENEZER CLARK, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

FRANCIS LORETTE STRICKLAND, Ph.D., D.D., Professor of Philo- 
sophy 
CHARLES BENTON CANNADAY, A.M., Professor of Latin 
CHARLES HENRY AMBLER, Ph.D., Professor of History (Extension) 
LORIMER VICTOR CAVINS, A.M., Professor of Education 
SIMEON CONANT SMITH, 1 A.M., Associate Professor of Rhetoric 

ARLEIGH LEE DARBY, 2 A.M., Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages 
DAVID DALE JOHNSON, A.M., Associate Professor of English 
LUCIUS MOODY BRISTOL, 3 Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology 

BENJAMIN TOWNE LELAND, A.M., Associate Professor of Indus- 
trial Education 

LAWRENCE BENJAMIN HILL, A.M., Associate Professor of Educa- 
tion 

LONNA DENNIS ARNETT, Ph.D., Librarian and Instructor in Library 
Science 

BENJAMIN WALTER KING, 4 A.M., Assistant Professor of Economics 

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG PRICE, JR., 5 Ph.D., Ossistant Professor of 
Geology 

HUBERT HILL, M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
SAMUEL MORRIS, A.M., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
HARRISON RANDALL HUNT, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology 
FREDERIC DANIEL OHEYDLEUR, A.B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 

of French 
ROBERT CAMERON COLWELL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics 
ROBERT CLIFTON SPANGLER, A.M., Instructor in Botany 
CHESTER PENN HIGBY, Ph.D., Instructor in History 



1 On leave of absence. 

3 On leave of absence. With Y. M. C. A. in Italy. 
•On leave of absence during first semester. With the Red Cross. 
* On leave of absence. In United States Shipbuilding Service. 
a On leave of absence during first semester. In United States Military 
Service. 



The ( "<»! i boe of Arts vnv S< n n< 67 

MERLE LOUIS NEBEL,' Pit .1). Assistant PrOfeSSOT 0/ ' 

MARY meek ATKKsox, ,\ m . Instructor m English 
REBECCA Ll'ELLA POLLOCK, A.M. hMtrwctor in Engl 
charles BYRON JOLLIFFE, B. s. Instructor k PJ 

ANTONIO JOSEPH PROVOST, AM lnstn,.t- tr in I >•» tih 

ERNEST key. a i: Instructor hi FVencJI 
EDGAR Williams, a.m. Instructor m English 
HAROLD FRANTZ ROGERS, a.m.. Instructor In Chemistry 
ROBERT morris wylie. am. Instructor in Physics 
CHARLES K. hedrick.* a.m.. Instructor n History 
HUNTER WHITING.' A.B . Instructor m French 
LAURA F. LEWIS/ /LB., Instructor in English 
WALTER S. FROST. Ph.D.. Instructor in Chemistry 
CLARICE HOP.ensach. BJ3., Ein .. Assistant m Uathenu 
CLAIRE FISHER. Btudent Assistant in Mathematics 

EVA MYRTELLE FLING. A.B.. Student Assistant in Botany 
MARGARET DICKEY RICHARDS. Student Assistant in Botanu 
CECIL ORVAL RIGGS, Student Assistant in Ch- 
PAUL EDMUND HAGER. Student Assistant in Chemistry 

FACULTY COMMITTEE 

Mini i <>\ Stiukms' CoUBSn ami Hoi i:>: Deau CALLAHAN. 
■President TROTTER, and Professor DEAHL. 



' Died, October 12, 1918. 

3 Temporarily tr from the faculty of the Fairmont Normal 

School. 

•Transferred from the faculty of the M iral .11 College &\ I Morn I 8 

for the first semester. 
♦Transferred from the faCUtly of the GHenvlUe >•■•• N & d fOl 

the first sem> 
i Transferred from the faculty Of the Fairmont Stat.- Normal School for 

the first semester. 



68 West Virginia University Catalogue 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

For admission to the College of Arts and Sciences,, the candi- 
date must have credit for fifteen units, obtained by examination or on 
certificate from a duly accredited secondary school. 

1. English: Students are admitted to the freshman classes in 
English on completion of a four-year high school course in English, 
or its equivalent, and receive credit for three or four units.* 

2. Foreign Language: Two units of one language are required, 
(Latin is prescribed for students in this college preparing to enter the 
College of Law and the School of Medicine.) 

3. Mathematics: One unit of algebra and one of plane geometry 
are required. 

4. History: One unit is required. 

5. Science: One unit is required of either physics, chemistry, 
botany, zoology, or biology. 

6. Elective: Enough is required from the following list to com- 
plete 15 units: 

Drawing (free hand and mechanical) ... .1 to 2 units 

French __ 1 to 3 

German 1 to 3 

Latin 1 to 4 

Greek __ . 1 to 3 

Mathematics \ to 11 " 

Science \ to 3 " 

Social Science (including history, civics 

and economics) __ 1 to 3 

Vocational subjects (including agriculture 

commercial subjects, household art's. 

and manual training) 1 to 3 

Other subjects which have a recognized place in the first-class 
high schools will also be accepted by the Committee on Entrance. 
Students who have completed an accepted four-year high school course, 
even if they have not taken the specified work, will be admitted and 
an opportunity will be given to make up the required work later. 

A single unit of language will not be accepted unless at least six 
semester hours of further work in that language is taken in the Uni- 
versity. 

For a detailed statement of the amount of work required for each 
unit of entrance credit see pages 57-64. 



♦Four units will be allowed in English done in schools in which the 
work of high school prade is carried through four full years and the in- 
structor has been specially prepared in English and has not work outside 
of thsn subject. 'See pasre 58. 



The ( College op Arts \m» s< ien< 
REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES. 

only one baccalaureate degree li regularly conferred In the (,,, i 

lege of Arts and Sciences, that <>t Bachelor oi \: 

Th» of Bachelor of Bdence li con f e r red only u ■ 

ree upon candidates who are pursuing either the combined sd< 

and engineering course, the combined science and agriculture 

or the combined Bcientifie and medical com 

Amount of Work Required. 

The "semester hour" Is the standard tor computing the amount 
of work required for graduation in the curricula leading to : 
degrees. The "hour*' represents tin- amount of work done In 
semester (eighteen weeks) in one recitation hour with two prepara- 
tion hours a week. No student Is permitted to than 

fourteen hours or more than of work in any one 

semec 

The baccalaureate degree In I 

conferred upon any student who complies with the general regulations 
of the University concerning A - announced en p itis- 

Qee all entrance requirements, and secures credit for one hundred and 
twenty-eight semester hours selected in accordance with following 

provisions. 

The Major Subject. 

At the beginning of the sophomore year the student m . 

as his major study one of the following BUD* I 

Rlish Hist iny 

Public Speaking Political Science Zoo! 

Greek momics Bntomol 

Latin ;,»_•>• 

rman Phya Ion 

nch Cm Philosophy 

Italian tics Home Kconomic- 

oisfa 

The head of the department to which this major buI 

>mes the student's <i & The major requirement la 

hours which may be either 30 hour.- in the on.- in... 

to S5 hours in that | 10 boUTS in ahOl 

dost i> related. ' ; 

taken in the major and the allied subjects, and ma> 



70 . West Virginia University Catalogue 

25 hours in the one subject. Additional courses in the major subject 
or in the allied subject may of course be taken as elective if the 
student so desires. 

Special Requirements. 

For Students Who Desire The Degree of A.B. 

During his course each student must take courses in each of eight 
groups of subjects as shown below: 

1. English composition (English 1 and 2) 6 H r& 

English literature (English 26 and 27) 4 * 

2. One foreign language 20 " 

NOTE] — If this language is not the same as that 
offered for entrance then an additional 3 hours col- 
lege work in the entrance language must also be 
offered. 

3. History and political science, or economics 

and sociology 8 Hrs. 

4. Physics, chemistry, or mathematics; any one 8 " 

5. Botany, zoology, geology or entomology; any 

one 8 " 

6. Education, philosophy, public speaking; any 

one 8 " 

7. Military science (when required) 4 ", 

8. Eleotives; not less than 32 " 

NOTE. — At least five hours must be taken in each 
subject offered as an elective, except that not more 
than eight hours of credit in isolated courses ol 
less than five hours credit value each, elected with 
the approval of the class officer, may be offered. 

For Students Who Desire to Take a Combined Course in Two 
Colleges in Six Years. 

Students who desire to secure the degree of A.B. and LL.B. in 
six years may, after completing ninety-six hours (see above) in the 
College of Arts and Sciences elect the first year of the curriculum in 
Law (see page 234) as the work of their senior year. After receiving 
the A.B. degree they may then complete the Law Curriculum in two 
years. 

Students who desire to secure the B.S. degree and then take a 
bachelor's degree in the college of Engineering may complete the 



The Colli Arts and Son m T1 

work for both degrees in lis yean or leaf by following the eon 
lura outlined on Page 1S1 Thoee who cane the B.S. and 

B.S.Agr. degrees in a .similar time must follow the curriculum out- 
lined on Page 200. 

Students who desire to secure the B.S degree with a vi. 
proceeding to the study of medicine and who announce this intention 
on entering the freshman class will be excused from the El 
general requirement! and may secure the >f B.S. by takinu: 

sixty-four hours of work in the College of Arts and Sciences as out- 
lined cm and th»- course in the School of Medicine as outlined 
on pai 

Elective Courses. 

The remaining work necessary to make up the total of one hun- 
dred and twenty-eight hours required of candidates for the bachel* 
degree, may be selected from any of the courses offered in the Col. 
of Arts and Sciences. Work not to exceed fifteen hours in the Col- 
lege of Law, the College of Agriculture, or the College of Engineering 
may be included in the list of elective credits offered by students in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. The total number of hours elected 
from other colleges shall not, however, exceed twenty-four in all. 

Classification of Students. 

To be classified as a conditioned freshman in the College of 
and Sciences a student must have credit for at least thirteen uni< 
entrance requirements; to be classified as a regular freshman he must 
have fulfilled all entrance requirements and have credit for twenty Rre 
hours of college work; as a junior, fifty-eight hours: as a senior, 
ninety-two hours. 

GRADUATE DEGREES. 

There are two advanced degrees conferred in the College of Arts 
and Sciences: Master of Arts and Master of Science. For the condi- 
tions upon which thes. :ned see page 40. 



72 West Virginia University Catalogue 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

In the following announcements each course described counts 
for the number of. hours in parentheses after the name of the course. 
Whenever possible, the semester during which the course is given, the 
hour, the name of the instructor, and class room are stated at the 
end of the announcement of each course. For convenience it is 
customary to designate the courses of study by the name of the de- 
partment and the number of the particular course. Thus the course 
in psychology is known as "Philosophy V*; the course in plane trig- 
onometry is known as "Mathematics 4"; the course in electrical 
measurements is known as "Physics 10"; etc. The abbreviations used 
are W., Woodburn Hall; S.. Science Hall; M., Martin Hall; M. H., 
Mechanical Hall; C, Commencement Hall; A., Agricultural Building; 
E., Experiment Station Building; G., Gymnasium; L., Library; H., 
Horticulture Building; M. B., Medical Building. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 

16. High School Agriculture (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00, T., 2:00; Professor Winkler. 

35. Methods in Agricultural Extension (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T. Th., 11:00. 

Credit will also be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for 
course 1 in the history of Agricultural education offered in the College 
of Agriculture. For detailed announcements of all these courses see 
page 202 



AGRONOMY. 

Credit will be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for courses 
2 and 21 in agronomy in the College of Agriculture. See page 203. 



ANIMAL INDUSTRY. 

Credit will be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for 
courses 40, 42, 43, 45 and 46 in animal husbandry, and course 21 in 
dairy husbandry in the College of Agriculture. See pages 206-9. 



Tin: ( SOLLEGl OF Aim'- \\i> S« n \. 

BOTANY. 
Professor Shu DON and M I ■ 

NOTE For a description of the botanical laboratory 

1. General Botany. (J His.) LectUTei and q &sm, 

the cii. ami the morphology, physiology, classification, and economic 
Importance <>f algae and fungi in general, with laboratory and 
work. Laboratorj ! 00. 

First Bemester; T Th., &:< ': Professor Sheldon; laboratory, W 
P., 1:00; Mr Bpahoi i a, P. 

2. General Botany. (I His.) Continuation ol Botanj 1 

and quissea on the morphology, physiology, olaasiflcation, and eco- 
nomic Importance of the liverworts, mosses, ferns, and seed pi ints • 

laboratory and Held work. Laboratory fee, |2 

Second semester; T. Th.. 9:00; Professor Bhsxdon; laboratory, W. 
v . 2:00; Mr. Spanolkb, F. 

3. General Botany. (4 Hrs.) This and the following COOrS4 
primarily for students who cannot give as much tin: 

Is required for courses 1, - and 

rey of th various groups of plants — algae, fungi, ra rns, and 

seed-plants. Laboratory fee, $2 

First semester; T. Th. or w. P., 8:00; Proft i><>\: lal 

tory sections, T. Th.. \v. P., Th. m . T P., 8:00; T. 8: 
sp \ !foi n: and assistants, F 

4. Seed-Plants. (ML 

ology, ecology, and economic Importance of seed-plants 

work La required. Second half-semester: Char* 'rin- 

cipal families of seed-plants: practice in the use of a manual for : . I 

tification and classification, a collection Ifl 

I 

T Th.. or w F 1:00; 
oratory sections, T. Th., w. P., Th. If., T. F 
Mr. 8p uigi 1 1: and Assistants, P 

5. Systematic Botany of Seed-Plants. 1 8 HtTi I T - OOUT • 

dudes a brief survey of the development of - 

m of th.- morphol 
and ition \ collection is required Lr 

or 4. 

M W P . t Field work for tl 

inst. ad oi ' fir<t; i 



74 West Virginia University Catalogue 

NOTE — Special courses in systematic botany of the fresh-water 
algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns, grasses and sedges, shrubs and 
trees, and weeds will be arranged for students who have had sufficient 
preparation to profit by such courses. 

10. General Bacteriology. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for juniors. This 
is a general course on the nature of bacteria — what they are, how they 
live, and what they do — with practice in growing and studying them. 
Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

First semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Sheldon; laboratory, T. 
or Th., 2:00; Mr. Spangler, F. 

Second semester; hours as in first semester. 

12. Plant Physiology. (3 Hrs.) A fundamental course on the 
relation of plant structure to function and stimulus. Some knowledge 
of chemistry and physics is desirable. Prerequisite: Botany 2 or 4. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:00; laboratory, T. or Th., 2:00; Profes- 
sor Sheldon, F. 

13. Plant Physiology. (3 Hrs.) The physiology of plant produc- 
tion. The preparation of a paper on the physiology of some special 
crop is required. Prerequisite: Botany 12. 

Second semester: T. Th., 10:00; Professor Sheldon, F. 

14. Plant Pathology. (5 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate stu- 
dents. Botany 12 should precede or accompany this course. The de- 
velopment of plant pathology and the nature, causes, and control of 
some of the common diseases of economic plants. A collection is re- 
cuired. Laboratory fee. $2.00. 

First semester; M. F., 10:00; laboratory, M. W. or W. F., 2:00; 
Professor Sheldon, F. 

17. Advanced Plant Pathology. (3 to 10 Hrs.) Open to senior 
and graduate students. The critical investigation of an assigned or 
approved problem. Laboratory fee to cover cost of material used. 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor Sheldon, F. 

18. Histology. (3 Hrs.) A study of tissues and tissue aggre- 
gates. The technique of imbedding, sectioning, mounting and staining. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor Sheldon and 
Mr. Spangler, F. 



Tut. I <>i. i i. i,i. <>\- ARTS am> S< iin, BE 
CHEMISTRY. 

Professor Wini» mi. i„ Professor Ci auk. Assistant Professor Hi 
Hni.. Assistant Professor Swuti IfoaaiS, Assistant Professor BlKI 

and Mr. Rockks. 

NOTE — For description of chemical laboratories 1A 

1. Inorganic Chemistry. (1 Hrs.) This course is primarily for 
beginners, but students who have offeivd elementary <h< mistry for 
entrance credit may take the course and receive credit «'ii thrir 
lege work. The course includes a study Of the theories and laws of 
chemical operations and combinations and of the non-motallie 
ments. Experimental lectures, and recitations. One laboratory period 
each week. Laboratory fee. $5.00. 

First semester; If. W. P., 9:00; T. Th. F., 10:00; M. W. F.. 11 
Professor Hiinniiii, 11' S. M. W. P.. 11:00, Assistant Professor IfOB 
20 S. M. \V. V.. »:00, Mr. RoOBS, 20 S. Laboratory section-; M. T. W 
Th. F., 2:00; T. Th., 10:00; Assistant Professor IfOBBIS, assistant Pro- 

or Besot, Mr. Roosne 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. (4 Hrs.) A continuation of Chemistry 1. 
This course includes the study of the metallic elements. Special 
attention Is paid to the applications of chemistry to agriculture, en- 
gineering, medicine and every day life. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 9:00; T. Th. F.. 10:00; If. \V. F., 11:00; 
Professor Win n ii n i.. 12 S. M. \Y. F., 11:00, Assistant Professor IfoSJUS, 
20 S. M. W. F.. 9:00, Assistant Mr. ROSBS, 20 S. Laboratory' sections; 
If. T. W. Th. F., 2:00; T. Th., 10:00; Assistant Professor BfOBBlS, AS- 
sistant Professor BOOT, Mr. Rod IS. 

3. Organic Chemistry. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite. Chemistry 1 or the 
completion of any standard elementary text in inorganic Chemistry, 
accompanied by individual work. Experimental lectures, recitations, 

and laboratory work. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; Professor Whiifiiiii. I 

4. Qualitative Analysis. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for 
engineering degrees. A continuation of Chemistry 2. The cour-. 
treats of those properties which are of importance in the separation 
and identification of the common metals and acids. Chemical t 
tions are studied from the point of view of modern theories of solu- 
tions. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

First semester; T. Th., 2:00-5:00; Assistant Professor Hiii. 31 S. 



West Virginia University Catalogue 

5. Qualitative Analysis. (4 Hrs.) For Students in the College of 

A continuation of Chemistry 2. A course similar 
hemistry 4. hut more extended. Laboratory fee $12. '">0. 
First semester: M. \Y F.. 2:00-6:00 it Professor Hill. 

6. Quantitative Analysis. (5 Hrs.) For students in the College of 

A course treating of the elementary principles of 
metric and volumetric analysis. Laboratory fee. $10.00. 
:id semester: daily. |; Assistant Professor Hill. 

17. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. (4 Hrs.) A course pri- 
marily for students of pharmacy. Laboratory fee. $10.00. 

First semester; M. W. F.. 1:00-5:00; Assistant Professor Hill. 

18. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. (5 Hrs.) A course for 
students preparing for medicine. Laboratory fee. $12.00 

daily, 2 Assistant Professor Hill. 

26. Quantitative Analysis. (2 Hrs.) A course for students in min- 
- ::gineering. LiiboraUr; 

be arranged I ; Assistant Pro- 

r Hill. 

7. Quantitative Analysis. (4 Hrs.) Continuation of Chemis- 
Difficult analyses with frequent reference to the literature of the 
subjects treated. Laboratory fee. $1 

First semester: T. W. Th. F.. 2:00-5:00: Professor Clark. 

8. Quantitative Analysis. (5 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate 
students. Analysis of organic material, food-stuffs, etc. according to 
the needs of the students. Prerequisites: Chemistry 3 and 7. Li 
tory fa . 

Second seme-: - I •: Professor Clark. 32 S 

9. Organic Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) Required of students preparing 
for medicine and recommended to students whose major is che: 
Laboratory fee. $12 

First semes: - r 10:00-12 Clark. 

20. Organic Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) A continuation of Chemistr\ 9. 
Laboratory fee. $12 v 

00-12:00; Professor Clark S 

16. Organic Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) For students of agriculture, 
domestic science and mining engineering. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2. 
A combined recitation and laboratory course. Laboratory fee. 

First semester: T. Th.. 9:00; laboratory. T Th.. 2: "0-5: CM); Pro- 
fessor Clark. 



• 



11. Quantitative Analysis. (1 Bn ) Open to 
students. Required of all students who select chemistry ss their 
major subject. The coarse includes practice in the analyst* of from 
and steel, iron ores, limestone, sand, day and other materials usually 
brought to the laboratory of an iron and steel works. Laboratory 
oOO. 

: semester; T. Th.. 2:00; Professor Werrrmtt, ;: 



: Quanttat ve Ara ,. . Hrs) Open to seniors and rradwate 

Continuation of course 11. Laboratory fee. 14.00. 
nd semester: T. Th.. 2:00; Professor WHrrrHiu., . 



Chemical Preparations, (2 Hrs.) This course will 
the preparation of some of the more important inorganic and 
compounds. The course is designed to meet the requirement* of stu- 
dents who wish to take advanced work in general chemistry, or who 
- to become teachers of the science. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1 and 
2 or their equivalent Laboratory fee. $4.00. 

-r.*?r.*r: T Th.. 2:00; Professor Whitehiij.. . 

~ical Calculations, (2 Hrs 7- - coarse is designed for 

students who wish to study the mathematical principles which are 

involved in chemical operations. It includes the consideration of 

questions involving weight and volume reactions, atomic and moiee*- 

■ eight determinations and the methods of calculating the results of 

yses. Prereq . 1 and 2 or their equivalent 

Second semester: T. Th.. 2:00: Profesw Whitfhiix. . 

BMsntstry. (Z Hrs | Open to seniors and grad: 
whose major is chemistry or who are doing work in 
eering subjects. A study of industrial processes related to chem- 
Inorganic processes and organic processes will be treated In 

alternate year * La bora to- >♦. 

Second semester: Professor Ci.\«. 30 &. 

21. Physical Chemistry. (3 Hr^ | Lectures and laboratory work. 
Determir molecular weights, solubilities, electrical eoadnetiv- 

tc. Prerequisite: Chemistry 6. (Omitted 1*19-29.) 
First semester: M. W. F. lv:tt-12:M. 

Special Work. Work in any of the various departments of the 
ce may be taken in the laboratory under the direction of the 
instructors, and credit will be given in proportion to the amour 
work accomplished. 



78 West Virginia University Catalogue 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY. 

Professor Vickers, Associate Professor Bristol and Assistant Professor 

King. 

Instruction in this department is designed to meet three special 
needs of students: (1) Training for individual efficiency in getting a 
living under present economic and social conditions; (2) training 
which will enable students to understand the existing economic and 
social order — whence arise many urgent problems of the time — and 
intelligently to discharge their duties as citizens; (3) training to pre- 
pare those so electing to continue advanced study and specialization 
in economics and sociology. 

Economics 1 and 2 will be helpful to students in all other courses 
in the department, and are specified prerequisites for entrance to 
most of these courses. They should therefore be taken first by all 
students who contemplate further work in economics and sociology. 
Courses in sociology should, so far as practicable, be deferred till 
the junior and senior years. Sociology 1 is a prerequisite for all other 
courses in sociology except 6, 7, 8, 10, 14 and 15. 

Economics. 

1. Principles of Economics. (3 Hrs.) A general course on funda- 
mental principles governing consumption, production, distribution and 
exchange of wealth. Designed to be followed by Economics 2. 

First semester; first section, M. W. F., 8:00; second section, M. W. 
F., 9:00; third section, M. W. F., 10:00; Professor Vickers, 21 W., and 
Assistant Professor King, 36 L. 

2. Principles of Economics. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of preceding 
course. Prerequisite: Economics 1. 

Second semester; first section, M. W. F., 8:00; second section, M. 
W. F., 9:00; third section, M. W. F., 10:00; Professor Vickers, 22 W.. 
and Assistant Professor King, 36 L. 

15. Principles of Economics. (3 Hrs.) A general course on funda- 
mental principles which govern the consumption, production, distribu- 
tion and exchange of wealth. Designed especially for students in the 
College of Agriculture. Open also to sophomores and more advanced 
students who cannot take both Economics 1 and Economics 2. 

First semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Vickers, 21 W. 

3. History of Economic Thought. (2 Hrs.) Development of eco- 
nomic theories from antiquity to the present time. Causes, nature 
and effects of changes; relation to economic and political institutions. 
Prerequisites: Economics 1 and 2. 

First semester; T. Th.. 9:00; Professor Vickers, 21 W 



Tin: ( iOLLBGI OF ASTS \\i» 8< IEN< 

14. Distribution of Wealth. (2 Hrs.) Open to senior and grad- 
uate students. The actual apportionment of wealth anion- lh 

classes of s<>ci.»ty; effects of oomnetHloii. monopoly, combination! 
capital and labor, government regulation. Prereqniaitea: Bconomli 
2 and 3. (Omitted 1918-19.) 

First semester; T. Th.. B:00; Profemor VlCEMBB, 11 W. 

4. Relations of Government to Economic Enterprise. (2 ! 
Open to senior and graduate students. Functions of fOTemmeni, both 
state and municipal, in relation to economic enter;. 

and expediency of government regulation and of pmrnrnilMint "'Wi-r 

ship; method^ and results for typical enterprises. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; Professor Vickkks. 22 W 

5. Money, Credit and Banking. (3 Hrs.) The nature and functions 
of money; nature and uses of credit; functions of banks and principles 
of banking as revealed in the banking system of leading count: 
Special reference to the United States. Prerequisite: Economic- 1 
and 2. 

First semester; M. W. F.. 9:00; Professor Vk EBBS, 2l' W 

6. Public Finance. (4 Hrs.) Principles governing expenditures 
of modern governments; sources of revenue; uses of public credit; 
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration 
as revealed in fiscal systems of leading countries. Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 1 and 2. 

Second semester; M. T. Th. F., 10:00; Professor Vkkkhs, tl W 

7. Transportation. (3 Hrs.) Nature, history and problems of 
railway transportation, especially in the United States; rates, dis- 
crimination, government regulation and government ownership. Pre- 
requisite: Economics 1 and 2. 

Second semester; M w p.. 11:00; Assistant Professor Koto, 36 L. 

8. Transportation. (3 Hrs.) Water transportation, inland an.! 
ocean, with special reference to the United States. Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 1 and 2. (Omitted 1919-2" .) 

Second semester; M. \v. f. 11:00, assistant Professor Kino, 36 L. 

9. History of Commerce. (3 His.) Nature and methods of trade 
among the ancients. Results of maritime tUsooreries, Changi of r o D 
international treaties, inventions, government regulation and tl 
promoting agendas. 

First semester; T. Th.. 10:00 and a third hour to be arranged \. 
eistant Professor King. 36 L. 



so West Virginia Tnivkhsitv Catalogue 

24. Materials of Commerce. (3 Hrs.) A study of agricultural, 
animal, mineral and manufactured products; their distribution and 
markets. 

First semester; T. Th., 8:00; and a third hour to be arranged; 
Assistant Professor King, 36 L. 

13. Natural Resources of the United States. (3 Hrs.) The ex- 
ploitation and conservation of natural resources; soils, minerals, for- 
ests, marine products; relation to distribution and activities of the 
people and to national development. 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00; and a third hour to be arranged; 
Assistant Professor King, 36 L 

10. Internationa! Trade Policies. (3 Hrs.) Nature, advantages 
and relative importance of trade between nations. Protective and 
revenue tariffs in theory, and in the practice of leading nations. 
Special reference to the United States. Prerequisite: Economics 1 
and 2. (Omitted 1818-19.) 

First semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Vickers, 22 W. 

11. Labor Problems. (3 Hrs.) Origin and nature; methods of 
amelioration and reform; woman and child labor, sweating, immigra- 
tion, unemployment, labor legislation, arbitration; cooperation, 
profitsharing, insurance, industrial education. Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 1 and 2. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Vickers, 22 W. 

17. Business Organization. (2 Hrs.) Forms of business organiza- 
tion and their development; individual enterprise, partnership, cor- 
poration, combination; resulting problems and requisite public policy. 
Prerequisite: Economics 1 and 2. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:00; Professor Vickers, 22 W. 

20. Corporation Finance. (2 Hrs.) An exposition of the financial 
organization of a large corporation, including the securities issued, 
promotion, underwriting, reorganization, and the resultant financial 
problems. Prerequisite: Economics 1 and 2. (Omitted, 1919-20.) 

First semester; T. Th., 11:00; Assistant Professor King, 36 L. 

21. Business Cycles. (2 Hrs.) An inquiry into the causes of 
business and prosperity, crisis, panics and depressions, with the aid of 
statistical method; a review of the various theories which have been 
advanced in the past with an attempt at constructive interpretation. 
Prerequisites: Economics 1 and 2. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; Assistant Professor King, 36 L 



The Colli - M 

22. Insurance. (2 HTS.) Insurance in its fundan.. • 
history; principles and their main applications; life, casualty, health, 
fire, marine and other hazards. (Omitted 1919-20.) 

Second : T. Th . 11:00; AssUtaiH L 

30. Contemporary Economic Problems. (1 Hi) A Critical Studj 

of some economic problems which are rabjecta of current discussion 
or recent legislation. 

First semester; Th.. 4:80; Pro fes sor Vienna, 12 M. 

31. Contemporary Economic Problems. (1 llr.) Continuation of 
Economics 20. 

Second semester; Th., 4:20; Professor Vigus, 12 m. 

Sociology. 

I. Elements of Sociology. (3 Hrs.) A general outline of sociolog- 
ical doctines with special emphasis on the origin and develops 

of social institutions. Prerequisite: Economics 1, 2, or the consent of 
instructor. 

First semester; If. P., 10:00, and a third hour to be arranged; As- 
sociate Professor Bristol. 

II. Applied Sociology. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of preceding 
course with emphasis on the application of the laws and principles of 
social organization and development to problems of social Improvement 
Prerequisite: Sociology 1. 

Second semester; If. F., 10:00, and a third hour to be arran| 
Associate Professor Bristol. 

2. Social Organization. (3 Hrs.) Laws and principles underlying 
social organization and activity; scope and methods of social control. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 1. 

Second Semester: T. Th.. 8:00. and a third hour to be arranged. 
Associate Professor BRISTOL. 

4. Theories of Social Progress. (3 Hrs. i An approach to social 
philosophy through biology, anthropology, psychology, history and 
social science by a critical and constructive study ot repress ntative 
writers. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

First semester; M. W. P., 8:00; Associate Professor Bimmoi. 

6. Statistics. (3 Hrs.) The principles of statistics as a method 
of recording and presenting social and economic facts, with applica- 
tion to concrete problems. Prerequisite: Economics 1 and 2. 

First semester; T. Th.. 11:00; two-hour laboratory period '■ 
arranged: Associate Professor Bristol. 



82 West Virginia University Catalogue 

7. Social Investigation. (3 Hrs.) Research and field work along 
selected lines of investigation. Prerequisite: Sociology 6. 

One hour weekly, to be arranged, and not less than six hours of 
Investigation. Second semester; Associate Professor Bristol. 

8. Problems of Child Welfare. (2 Hrs.) Heritage of the child, 
health, home conditions, play, training, work; defective, dependent and 
delinquent children; institutions and movements for child saving. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; Associate Professor Bristol. 

9. Race Problems. (2 Hrs.) History, causes and effects of immi- 
gration; methods of assimilation. The negro problem. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 1. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; Associate Professor Bristol. 

10. Rural Sociology. (3 Hrs.) A broad survey of the field of 
rural life in its social aspects; methods of improvement. 

Second semester; M. W. F.. 11:00; Associate Professor Bristol, 

12. Crime and Punishment. (2 Hrs.) Theories and history of 
crime and punishment; causes of crime; modern methods of correction 
and prevention. Prerequisite: Sociology 1. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:00; Associate Professor Bristol. 

13. Scientific Philanthrophy. (2 Hrs.) Causes, amelioration and 
prevention of poverty; philanthropic institutions, their scope, man- 
agement, control, inspection. Prerequisite: Sociology 1. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00; Associate Professor Bristol. 

14. Current Social Problems. (1 Hr.) A critical study of current 
social problems and movements. Training in the use of periodical 
literature and reference works. 

First semester; T., 4:30; Associate Professor Bristol. 



14. 



15. Current Social Problems. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Sociology 
Second semester; T., 4:30; Associate Professor Bristol. 



The ( !ou i enceb 

EDUCATION. 

Professor Di mm. Professor Cavuvb, Associate P r L B Hill, 

ami associate Pr \ * o. 

The courses offered in this department aim to contribute to the 

educational Influences and to the pi •'■ th€ ><•:.. 

of the stat.- in the following way-: (1)1 -t bhOM stud 

who study the Bcience of education as i pari ol tb< ral education. 

(2) To afford students who wish to t.-ach for a tim< 

the means of profeaalona] training commensurate with their 
training. (3) To furnish appropriate profeaalona] .'ducat ion to stu- 
dents, and to ;in> experienced teachers of suitable age and attainnx 
who may desire to HI themselves to Ix teachers, principal rln« 

tendents of schools. 

Students who take education as their major and who • 
do administrative and supervisory school work should take OOJ 

courses representing ■ wide range of subjects taught In the public 
schools. 

Those who expect to teach education or become training tea< 
Should indicate their desire that their course may \x I to thai 

end. 

Those who are preparing to teach academic - hould fit 

themseta Instructioii In as many as three subjed 

All students Whose mSJOT is education should so plan t! 
that the afternoons in their senior year may be open for pra. I 
teaching, or for supervisory work, or for experimental work in educa- 
tion. 

XOTE— For other announcements concerning education 
pages 26 and 51. 

1. History of Education— Early Christian. Mediaeval, and Transi- 
tion to Modern. (2 Hrs.) The development of education as an institu- 
tion for Social service; the origin and development Of the aims, sub- 
ject matter, and method* of education; individual realization and 
social service; content and formal values In educational progress; 
conservative and progressive forces in educational development and 

retardation. 

First semester; ftf w. P., 8:00; Aj Hill, 16 w 

2. History of Education — Modern. (2 Hrs .) A study of the rise 
and development of modern educational theory; scientific psycho- 
logic logical, and vocational tendencies In education; the de- 
velopment of national, state, and city systems of schools; modern 
programs of studies, organisation and methods 

Second semester; M w F. S: r Hnx, II W, 

4. Philosophy of Edi nation. (3 His.) Tl explains the 

process Of education fr< m the standpoint Of the d<>c*rin- of ( volution; 

the principles thus shrived at are applied from the standpoint of Um 

history of c'vn;. ,on, the developing mind of the child, and the culti- 
vation of dividual and social efficient 

Fir semester; If, W. P., 11:00; Professor Or \in 17 YV 



84 AYest Virginia University Catalogue 

6. School Administration and Supervision. (2 Hrs.) Primarily 
for principals and superintendents of schools, and for those who are 
preparing for such school work. School boards, buildings and grounds, 
equipment, the preparation of principals and superintendents, the pre- 
paration, selection and promotion of teachers, city and rural supervision, 
examination and tests, grading and promoting pupils. 

First semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Deahl, 17 W. 

7. School Administration and Supervision. (3 Hrs.) Open to 
seniors and graduate students. This course makes a study of scientific 
management as applied to school administration and supervision. School 
surveys, measurement of school products, tests of teaching, efficiency 
and supervisory control of learning and teaching in school procedure. 

Second semester; T. Th., 4:00; Professor Deahl, 17 W. 

8. Foreign School Systems. (3 Hrs.) The purpose of this course 
is to make a comparative study of the school systems of France and 
Germany, together with special features of other continental systems. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Deahl, 17 W. 

9. School Systems, British and American. (3 Hrs.) This course 
deals with the development and present status of education in Eng- 
land. Scotland, Canada and the United States. 

First semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Associate Professor Hill, 17 W. 

NOTE — Courses 8 and 9 will not be given unless the number of 
students desiring them is considered sufficient by the instructor in 
charge. 

10. The Principles and Art of Teaching. (3 Hrs.) Required of 
all students who are candidates for recommendation for teachers' 
certificates. Students will formulate and discuss lesson plans; do 
observation work, and teach regular classes; observe, so far as condi- 
tions will permit, lessons given by regular teachers, and report these 
in class. Prerequisite: Education 12 or 17, and Education 4 and 23. 

First semester: First section, M. W. F., 9:00; Associate Professor 
Hill. 16 W. Second section, hours to be arranged; Professor Cavins. 

11. Criticism and Supervision of Instruction. (3 Hrs.) Open to 
seniors and graduate students. This course is planned for teachers, 
supervisors, principals, and superintenden \ of schools. Lessons will 
be planned and then taught with a class of pupils in the public schools 
of Morgantown. The lessons thus taught will* be discussed in confer- 
ence. The course will afford an opportunity ffr observation of les- 
sons, practice teaching, and the supervision of instruction. 

Second semester; M. W. F.. 9:00; Professor Deahl, l\w. 



The Oolu 

17. Principles of Study. (3 Hrs.) Primarih 
sophomores. The principle 

function and relation of un ti t l i ng, thinking, reasoning, 
ing in study will be empluiM. 

First semester; If. \v. F Di \m. it W 

12. Psychology of Learning and Teaching. (3 Hrs) The p 
pies that control rational learning and BQCOi JSftt] * 

such principles may he derived from pc 

sensation, perception, memory, imagination, reason, ISSOdatiol 

ideas, apperception, inter. -si and attention, mental development, will. 
habit and character. 

Second semester; M. P., 10:00, and a third hour to be arra: J 

Professor Di \u\ . it \v. 

23. Educational Psychology. (2 Hi-.) The original nature of 
man. his reflexes. Instincts and capacities as th tional 

growth and development; the significance of this basis in BChOOl work, 
in the selection of studies and in vocational and avocational pursuits; 
experimental determination of individual differences of school children. 

First semester; T. Th.. 8:' iate Professor Hin. 16 W 

20. Mental Tests and Measurements. (The amount of credit will 
depend on the quality and quantity of work done. 2 to 6 hours.) Open 
to seniors and graduates. Mental traits and capacities of normal, 
retarded, and delinquent children; teste and measurements for learn- 
ing and teaching; accurate standards for classifying and pr 
pupils in school. 

First or second semester; hours to be arrang r Death. 

IT \V. 

13. Seminar. (,°» His.) The program of BtUdles in the el- 
school. 

First Bemeater; T. Th.. hour- ranged; Assistant Pro; 

Fl IMIM.W. IT W. 

14. Seminar. (?, Hrs.) Open to 
schools and secondary education. 

First semester; T. Th.. Professor DkABX, IT \V 

15. District Supervision. (2 or :: Hrs.) For district and county 
superintendents and those preparing b positions. The fond 

of the rural school: th. programs of studies SV • uintry life; 

the preparation of teachers; the cl sing 

and successful teaching; the dnties and opportunities of district SU] 
visors; and the relations of the rural 
education. 

iter; T. Th . 11:00; Pi - \v 



86 West Virginia University Cataixkjue 

16. Agricultural Education. (3 Hrs.) Candidates for recommen- 
dation for a teacher's certificate who are registered in the College of 
Agriculture must take this course in place of course 10 in their senior 
year. (See announcements of College of Agriculture, page 202). 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Winkle*, 27 M. 

35. Agricultural Education. (2 Hrs.). For detailed announcement 
of the courses see page 202. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00. 

NOTE — For other courses in agricultural education, see page 202. 

18. The Teaching of English in the Secondary School. (2 Hrs.) 
Primarily for juniors and seniors. A study of the history of the 
development of the English course in the American high school, the 
principles of the selection and organization of subject matter, of 
methods of teaching, and standards for measuring methods of teaching 
and subject matter. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; Miss Pollock, 30 W. 

24. Practical Work. (2 Hrs.) Required for recommendation for 
teachers' certificates The course is concerned primarily with planning 
and teaching lessons under the supervision of the instructor. The 
teaching is followed by conference and discussions; while taking this 
course each student will investigate the nature and value of the sub- 
ject matter taught and the most economic and effective method of 
teaching the subject. Prerequisite: Education 10 or its equivalent. 

Second semester: Section 1; T. Th., 9:00; Associate Professor 
Hill, 16 W. Section 2; T. Th., 10:00; Professor Cavins. 

25. Normal School Problems. (2 Hrs.) The function of the normal 
school and other teacher training agencies in the state; the relation of 
subject matter and its teachers to method and its teachers. A study 
of the appeal of the teaching profession, including the following 
topics: sources of recruits, reasonable certification requirements, forms 
of compensation, tenure, pensions, social position, and means of growth 
in service. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor Hill, 
16 W. 

26. Applied Statistics and Educational Tests and Measurements. 
(3 Hrs.) The purpose of this course is: (1) to acquaint the student 
with the theory and the application of the most useful statistical 
methods of dealing with educational materials; (2) to acquaint him 
with the standard-test movement by giving him actual experience in 
giving and scoring tests and in interpreting results. 

First semester; M. W. F.. 10:00; Professor Cavins. 



The < k)LLEO] 



-7 



27. Experimental Education. {'.) His.) The in. :. • 

carry on I laboratory experiment! to Ulus( rioui 

types of learning, the learning proeeee Invoh ens ol the school 

subjects, and Bonn attainment ir: 

of the class also makes a group report of the resuHs on 01 
perlmenta The laboratory wot 

the literature of • ttion. Such I kinds of 

learning, transfer of the efl a ill be discus- 

Iff. \v. v., 10:00; I 

28. Problems of Secondary Education. (2 Mrs.) Tl : - 

with the fundamental conception of the secondary school and its dif- 
ferentiation from other types of institutions. It Inelv 
the evolution of the present divisions of the school system and of th- 
divisions of European of the pi 

I in recent years, of the junior high school, in which a critical 
examination of typical courses of study will be made. Other problems 
dealing with organisations, equipment, and administration common t-> 
both the junior and senior high school will be the subjects of study 
and discussion. 

T. Th., 9:00; Pro 

29. Industrial Arts for the First Six Grades. (3 H; ) T: E < 

is designed to give to the teachers of the Hi -hods of 

organization and presenting information concerning the trades and in- 
dustrial life of the people. 

Kadi member of the ;>ected to plan a 

study for the grade in which she is teaching, together with a series of 
projects to be used with this co;; 

Work in wood, metal, and clay; bookbinding, printing, and - 
other work as is illustrative of the more important trades will !>• 
quired. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Lri.wn. 1 

NOTE: For other c a Industrie 

170. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

dit will 1 • 
51 to 56 in electrical engineering offered in tl 

• railed annou: 



ss West Virginia University Catalogue 

ENGLISH. 

Professor Armstrong, Professor Cox, Professor Barbe, Associate Pro- 
fessor Smith, Associate Professor Johnson, Miss Pollock, Miss 
Atkeson and Mr. Williams. 

Composition and Rhetoric. 

1. Composition and Rhetoric. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for freshmen. 
Required of all candidates for the bachelor's degrees in all the col- 
leges. Two themes weekly, conferences, recitations on text-books class 
criticism of written exercises, lectures. 

First semester; sections M. W. F. at 8:00, 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00; 
T. Th. S., at hours to be arranged; Professor Barbe, Associate Pro- 
fessors Smith and Johnson, Miss Pollock, Miss Atkeson and Mr. 
Williams, 31 W. 

Second semester; 8:00; Miss Pollock, 30 W. 

2. Composition and Rhetoric. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for freshmen. 
Required of all candidates for the bachelor's degrees in all the colleges. 
A continuation of course 1 with more attention to rules and principles. 
Two themes weekly; study of prose masterpieces as models of style 
and as material for themes; conferences, recitations, class criticism 
of written exercises, lectures. Prerequisites: English 1. 

Second semester; sections M. W. F. at 8:00, 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00: 
T. Th. S., at hours to be arranged; Professor Barbe, Associate Pro- 
fessors Smith and Johnson, Miss Pollock, Miss Atkeson and Mr. 
Williams, 31 W. 

First semester (if there is sufficient demand); hours and instruc- 
tor to be arranged, 31 W. 

NOTE — Students will not be admitted to English 1 and 2 whose 
work shows marked deficiency in spelling, punctuation, grammar, sen- 
tence structure, or paragraphing. 

Engineering and agricultural students will be assigned as far as 
possible to special sections. 

3. Composition and Rhetoric. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for sophomores. 
A continuation of courses 1 and 2 for students desiring further training 
and in composition. Two themes weekly. Prerequisites: English 1 
and 2. 

First semester; M. W. F.. 9:00; Associate Professor Smith, 21 W. 

16. English Words. (2 Hrs.) A study of English words and par- 
ticularly of the student's individual vocabulary from the standpoint of 
correct usage and of propriety and effectiveness of diction. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00; Associate Professor Johnson, 24 W. 



Tin: ( lOLLEGE Of AjTTS \n: - 

4. Exposition and Argument. (3 Hrs | A Stud] 0\ 
principles of these forms of composition; analysis of \ ;>eci- 
mens of expository and argumentative Literature; outlines, U* 
and exerdees. Required of all who make English their major. . 
req u isi t e: English 1. 2, 26 and I 

First semester; T. Th.. 10:00; I third hour to 1 
elate Professor JoHlfSOlf, 24 W. 

6. Description and Narration. (3 His ) A Btudj of ReneTSJ prin 

clples with en Prerequisites: English l. 2, 26 and 17. 

Second I m. W. v.. I:< eh, 21 w. 

7. The Essay. (2 His ) A study of the principles UUderlyifl 

Structure of the essay, with constant practice in their application. 
Prerequisites: English 1. 2, 26 and 27, and another course in composition 
of at least two hours. 

Second s e m e s te r; T. Th., 11 : " ate Professor Smith. 21 W 

10. The Letter. (2 Hrs.) Some great writers seen in their let 

idy of their use of this form of composition. Practice in wri: 
Prerequisites: English 1. - and another course in compos: 

of at least two hours. 

First semester; T. Th.. 11:00; Associate Professor Smith, 21 W. 

9. Style. (2 Hrs.) A study of the principles and elemen 
style; practice to develop an artistic sense in the writing of English 
prose. Prerequisites: English. 1. 2. 26, 27, and another course in com- 
position of at least two hours. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; Associate Professor SMITH, 21 W. 

5. Advanced Composition. (1 to 2 Hrs.) For advanced sfu 
in any department of the University. Prere q u is ites: English I ! 
another course in composition of at least two hours. 

Second semester; T. Th.. 1:00; \-sociate Professor Johhsoh, 24 W 

14. Technical English. (1 Hr.) Primarily for Benton in th» 
Of Engineering but <»pen to seniors and graduate students in all 
the coll* _ nsideration of some special problems of b 

composition, preparation, criticism, and revision of stud 
reports, theses, etc.: study of some good examples of technical Hi 
ture. 

: F.. 10:00; A—.xdate Professor JOBHSOIT, U W, 

13. Journalistic Composition. (2 Hrs.) Elementary 
- in pewspsper reporting; preparation of mss ; proofreading. Th-' 
con: Igned particularly for studentl 00 the editorial DOSjrdl 

Btudenl publications. Contributions and editorial work on these pub- 



West Virginia University Cataix>gue 

lications may be counted as part of the work of the course. Prere- 
quisites: English 1 and 2. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; Associate Professor Johnson, 24 W. 

15. Journalistic Composition. (1 or 2 Hrs.) Continuation of 
course 13. Open only to members of student editorial boards. 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor JOHN- 
SON. 24 W. 



English Language and Literature. 

The aims of this division of English are : (a) a scientific knowl- 
edge of the origin and development of the English language; (b) a 
general acquaintance with English literature; (c) a specific knowledge 
of certain great authors, periods, and movements in English literature. 
Freshman English is a prerequisite to other courses in literature. 

20. Old English. (3 Hrs.) Not open to freshmen Required of 
all students who make English their major. Bright's Anglo-Saxon 
Reader; the essentials of Anglo-Saxon grammar; translations. Pre- 
requisites: English 1, 2, 26, 27. 

First semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Professor Cox, 32 W. 

21. Old English — Beowulf. (3 Hrs.) Translations, with due at- 
tention to text, meter and literary history. Prerequisite: English 20. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Professor Cox, 32 W. 

22. Early Middle English. (2 Hrs.) Changes in the language. 
Critical reading of early middle English texts. Prerequisitp: Eng- 
lish 20. 

First semester; T. Th., 8:00; Professor Cox, 32 W. 

24. Chaucer. (3 Hrs.) The Canterbury Tales. Required of all 
students who make English their major. Prerequisites: English 1, 2. 
26. 27. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Professor Cox, 32 W. 

25. Shakespeare. (3 Hrs.) A critical study of Hamlet, Henry IV, 
Part II, and Romeo and Juliet. Required of all students who make 
English their major. Prerequisites: English 1. 2, 26, 27. 

First semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Cox, 32 W. 

26. General Survey of English Literature. (2 Hrs.) Primarily 
for freshmen. Required of candidates for degrees in the College of 
Arts and Sciences and in the College of Agriculture. Historical view 
of English literature from its beginnings to the eighteenth century, 



T,,, Coi re *ND S< i! \. i g 






and a dose, critical study of s :• * cli 

LB «,f lit. rarv development. 
Fir ' 

on Abmsivong, Cox, and Baxbs, sfisi Pollock, MIm atusoh, and 

Mr. Wiii i LM& 

27. General Survey of English Literature. (2 H is ) Primarily 
for freshmen. Etequll ' -" of 

Arts and 3 1 the Col! igricultur n of 

English -»"'. a Mirv. >• of English [iterator* to th< atb and nine- 

teenth oenturiea Prerequfcdte: E nglis h 
tkma T Th 

Prof kBMSTBOKG, OOJt, Mini BABBB, Mi— POLLOCK, M 

and Mr. Wn i i LM8. 

NOR— Students I 
tion with English 1 and 2, in order to make op five hours of freshman 
English required In each semester. 

28. Shakespeare. (3 Hrs.) Required ol all students who i 
English their major. One play U studied closely and critically, 

a number of others are read with attention to characters, plot devel- 
opment, and general literary Interpretation. Prerequisites: English 
1. 2, !*»;. 27. 

Second m M W P., 2:00; Professor Aaics I W. 

29. Milton. (2 Hrs ) A Btudy of Milton'.- poems and th 
gitica, l' 27, note. 

Seco: T. Th., 8:00; Pro I W. 

30. The Age of Elizabeth. (3 Hrs 

the sonnet and th.' important cypes of the drama Prerequisitea: Bug- 
lish 1. 2, (Omitted In WIS ! 

First semester; M. W v W. 

31. The Augustan Age. A study of those writers Who 

• t the classical spirit in English literature. Bmph 
will he laid upon Dryd.n. Swift and Pope PT( es: English 1. 

2 26 

Pirsl r; M. W. P . 9:00; Prof< ssor Cox, 32 W. 

32. English Literature. ( :: Hrs I From the death Of Swift to 

the publication of the Lyrical Ballads (174! The suth 

ied are Gray, Collins, Johnson, Goldsmith, Cowper, Sheridan, Burke, 

Barns, and Blake, with some attention I ithors Prerequli 

Fnpli>h 1. 2, 26, -~. 

Plrst ssmest( r: M. W P.. I 



92 West Virginia University Catalogue 

33. English Literature. (3 Hrs.) From the publication of Lyrical 
Ballads to the death of Scott (1798-1832). The authors studied are 
Wordsworth, Bryon, Shelley, Keats, and Scott. Prerequisites: English 
1, 2, 26, 27. (Omitted in 1919-20.) 

First semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

34. English Literature. (3 Hrs.) From the death of Scott to the 
death of Tennyson (1832-1892). Prerequisites: English 1, 2, 26, 27. 
(Omitted 1919-20). 

Second semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

35. English Literature. (3 Hrs.) Chief prose writers of the nine- 
teenth century. Prerequisites: English 1, 2, 26, 27. (Omitted 1919-20). 

Second semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

44. Mid-Victorian Poetry. (2 Hrs.) A study of the poetry of 
Matthew Arnold, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and William Morris, and of 
the relation of these writers to the spirit of their time. Prerequisites: 
English 1, 2. 26, 27. 

First semester; T. Th.. 9:00; Professor Barbe, 33 W. 

36. The English Old Testament. (3 Hrs.) Required of all students 
who make English their major. A study of the Old Testament in 
English as literature; discussion of its literary forms and interpreta- 
tion of some of its masterpieces. Prerequisites: English 1, 2, 26, 27. 

First semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

37. The English New Testament. (2 Hrs.) A study of the New 
Testament in English as literature. All the books are read and a 
few studied with attention to literary form and interpretation. Pre- 
requisites: English 1, 2, 26, 27. (Omitted in 1919-20.) 

First semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

38. The Short Story. (3 Hrs.) The short story as a form of 
literature. A study of its development and some of its types from Poe 
to the present time. Prerequisites: English 1, 2, 26, 27. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00; Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

39. American Literature. (3 Hrs.) A general survey of three cen- 
turies of prose and poetry in America as they express the life, spirit 
and ideals of the people. Prerequisites: English 1, 2. 26, 27. 

First semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

43. Types of American Fiction. (3 Hrs.) A study of a few ex- 
amples of the main types of American fiction with attention to their 
literary qualities and the pictures and problems of life presented. Pre- 
requisites: English 1, 2. 26, 27. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 



The ( "i.i.i.«. i. of Arts and S< 






50. Current Periodical Literature. (1 Ur.) The • the 

course Is to encourage students to read some of the best poemi 

and short itoriei appearing in American i>- rtodkmli of the Orel class. 

The work of the course will consist of lectu 

port-, and OS. Open to fn-shim n. 

Fir ter; M .. 10:00; Pi w*. 

Second s • (11 there is Boinclent demand), M 

56. Modern American Poetry. (2 Hrs.) A study of current 
recent poetry in America, with some attention I 

qulattes: English li -• W, 87. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:00; Pre kaMSTBOlfO, II W. 

57. Recent and Current English Poetry. (2 His ) A study ol 
representative English poets of the I ITS Pn H Qttft I 
English 1. 2, 26, 27. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; Professor Babbk, 82 W. 

54. The Modern Drama. (9 Hrs.) Reading and criticism of plays 
by recent and contemporary dramatists. Special attention will be giTCn 
to the problem play, a tew French plays in translation will be con- 
sidered. 

Second semester; If. W. and F. (F. at the option of the instructor) ; 
ll:o0; Professor Oox, 82 W. 

42. English Literature. (3 Hrs.) Study of an author. The entire 
production or the most important work of some selected author i> 
studied to gain a complete view. The author to be studied in 1918-19 is 
Rudyard Kipling. 

Second semester; T. Th.. 8:00; Professor AaM8TSON< . 81 W. 

47. Wordsworth. (3 Hrs.) A study of the poetry of Wordsworth. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 4:00; Professor Bans, 82 W. 

55. Tennyson. (.". Hrs.) A study of th« poetry of rennyt 
First r; If. W. F., 9:00; Professor Cox, 82 W 

51. Browning. (9 Hi> | \ study of the poetry of Robert Brown- 
ing. (Omitted in 1918-19). 

ml semester; If. W. v.. 1:00; Professor ' I \v 

40. The Novel. (3 Hrs.) Various types Of the novel | n 

in order to show its derelopmeni snd Its relation to lift 
English l. 2. 26, 27. (Omitted in 1919-20), 

Second M. w. f. ii:.:.. : Profoesor Oox, 82 W 

46. A Study of Poetry. (2 Hrs.) A discussion of metrical and 
rhythmical forms and of theories of English rerse; :le nssfntlel 
qualities and historical development of Fnprlish poetry. Th« <■« 
will Include a study of typical poems of th< - to illus- 

trate forms, principles, .-md theories. Prerequisites: Kn^rii^h 1, 

Second semester; T. Th.. 9:00; Professor Baas*; 



>4 West Virginia University Catalogue 

48. The Ballad. (2 Hrs.) A study of the traditional English and 
Scottish ballads with a special consideration of the types found in 
West Virginia. Elective for juniors, seniors, and graduate students. 
Prerequisites: English 1, 2, 26, 27. (Omitted in 1919-20.) 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00; Professor Cox, 32 W. 

52. The Nature Element in Poetry. (3 Hrs.) Special attention is 
given to Wordsworth, Bryant, and Lowell. Prerequisites: English 1, 
2, 26, 27. (Omitted in 1919-20). 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Cox, 32 W. 

The Teaching of English. 

18. The Teaching of English in the Secondary School. (2 Hrs.) 
Primarily for juniors and seniors. A study of the history of the develop- 
ment of the English course in the American high school, the principles 
of the selection and organization of subject matter, of methods of 
teaching and standards for measuring methods of teaching and subject 
matter. Prerequisites: English 1, 2, 26, 27. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; Miss Pollock, 30 W. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

Professor Peairs. 

1. General Entomology. (4 Hrs.) A study of the external struc- 
tures, classification, habits, and local distribution of insects and their 
near relatives. Lectures and text-book. Laboratory and field work 
in the collecting and mounting of the more common local insects, the 
classification of the insects, and the study, aided by dissections and 
drawings, of the external anatomy of various types. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. • 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Th.. 2:00; A. 

Credit will also be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for 
courses 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 9 in entomology offered in the College of 
Agriculture. For detailed announcement of these courses see page 210. 

FARM MANAGEMENT. 

Associate Professor Dadismax. 

2. Rural Economics. (3 Hrs.) The study of economics as related 
to all phases of rural life. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 8:00. 

Credit will also be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for 
course 1 in farm management offered in the College of Agriculture. 
For detailed announcement of this course see page 211. 

FRENCH. 

For announcement of courses in French see Romance Languages, 
page 122. 






Tin-: ( "ui.il OB OF ABT8 \ni> S« ii.\. 
GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

E > rofee8or Baows ami Assistant Professor Price. 

NOTES. — Excursions, see taken by the class* the outer 

the Ooal Measures and through the iresternmosl fold of * ich 

ian Mountains, giving, within a rad. • n miles of the I'limr-ity. 

a < oinplete geological section through the Y plan and Peni 

vanian (Coal Meeann ma Producing oil sad sre 

situated within ten miles of the Univ. r-dty 

For a description of the U mnseum and laboratory, 

page 25. 

2. General Geology. (.". Hrs.) Nc4 open to freshmen. The 

face features of the earth, stratigraphy, and structural - N 

merous excursions will be taken. Text-book. 1'irrson and BchnCJ 
Prerequisite: Some knowledge of chemistry. 

First semester; section One, M. W. F., 11:00; r BaoWN, 

111 M. H.. section two, M \V .F, 10:00; Assistant Professor Paid, 
111 If. H. 

3. Historical Geology. (1 Hrs.) Not open to freshmen. \ con- 
tinuation of Geology 2. The history of the earth and its inhabitant- 
as revealed in the rocks. Recitations, laboratory' and excursion-. 
Text-book. Pirrson and Schuchert. Prereauisites: Geology 2, and 
Geology 6 or 10. Some knowledge of botany and zoology- is d 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Second semester; If. W. F.. 10:00; laboratory. \Y . 8:00 t.» 5:00; 
• int Professor Pan e, 111 M. H. 

4. Economic Geology. (8 Hrs.) Designed for juniors ;m 

Treats of the occurrence and distribution of the non-metallic min- 
erals, with attention to the geology of coal, oil and eras Text-book. 
Ries' Economic Geology Prerequisite: Geology 2 or 6. 

rter; If. W. v. 11:00; aaststanl Professor Puca, ill 

If. H. 

5. Economic Geology. (1 Hrs.) Designed for juniors and seniors 
An account of the occurence of ore deposits and the distribution of 
metallic minerals. Text-book. Ries. Prerequisites: ("• J. or 
Geology 6. 

Second semester; M. \V. F. 10:00; Pr BsOWlf, 113 M H 

6. General Mineralogy. (.", Hrs ) | for sophomores The 
principles of crystallography, physical and chemical prop. 

tion, uses and determination of the more important minerals T 
book. Moses and Parson-* MlneralogJ PrereQOlsil ;md 

some knowledge of chemistry and phys 

First semes- rOfeSSOT BsOWlf, US M H 



f ' 6 West Virginia University Catalogue 

7. Determinative Mineralogy. (5 Hrs.) A continuation of course 
6. Work in determining minerals and making precise measurements 
with reflecting goniometer. Text-book, Moses and Parsons. Pre- 
requisites: Geology 6, some knowledge of chemistry and physics. 

Second semester; 8:00; Professor Brown, 113 M. H. 

8. Geology of West Virginia. (2 Hrs.) Designed for seniors and 
especially for teachers in high schools. This course is a physical 
history of the state and an account of its economic resources. Pre- 
requisite: Geology 2. 

First semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Brown, 111 M. H. 

10. Petrology and Building Stones. (2 Hrs.) A study of rocks 
with about 400 specimens of the various types from many countries. 
Adapted to the needs of engineers and architects. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Brown, 111 M. H. 

11. Physical Geography. (3 Hrs.) This course treats of the 
surface of the earth, its form, and the forces in action, with their 
effect on the life upon it. Designed especially for those who wish to 
teach physical geography. Outdoor trips. Prerequisite: Some knowl- 
edge of physics or chemistry. 

First semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Assistant Professor Price, 111 M. H. 

12. Methods in Paleontology. (2 Hrs.) A practical course in the 
methods of collecting, preparing, preserving and classifying inverte- 
brate fossils. Prerequisite: Geology 3 or Zoology 1. Text-book, 
Shimer. Laboratory fee to cover cost of materials used, not to exceed 
$3.00. 

Hours to be arranged; either semester; Assistant Professor Price, 
112 M. H. 

13. Oil and Gas Geology. (2 or 3 Hrs.) Designed for seniors. The 
origin, properties, distribution and mode of accumulation of oil and 
gas, solid and semi-solid bitumens; reservoirs of oil and gas; location 
of wells; survey of scientific and technical literature bearing on the 
geology and production of oil and gas, including current journals, gov- 
ernment and state publications. Text-book, Johnson and Huntley. 
Prerequisites: Geology 3, trigonometry, chemistry and physics. 

First semester; T. Th., and a third hour to be arranged, 8:00; As- 
sistant Professor Price, 111 M. H. 

17. Field Geology. (2 Hrs.) Designed for juniors and seniors. 
Each student will be assigned a near-by area and a complete study of 
its surface geology will be made in the field, with collection of speci- 
mens. From the notes taken, the student will make a geological map 



Tin: COLU Akts an: 3 

with structure sections. Prerequisites: Geology 3, f*J Labora- 

tory fee. $1.00. 

First semestt-r; S., B:00 to 12:00; Assistant Profess 111 

m a 

Engineering Geology. 

The following courses in ge<>'. I particularly to : 

the needs of students in miniru ring or in oil and gas • 

ing are offered in the College of Engineer:: 

89. Elementary Mineralogy. (2 Hr.-o Not counted for credit in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite: Chemistry | or equi- 
valent. 

First senustcr; T., I":"". W. 1 LUST, 

119 M. H 

92. Oil and Gas Production. (2 Hrs.) Leases and royalties; drill- 
ing and management of wells; valuation of oil and gas proper* 
reports on properties and prospects; size and scope of oil and 
companies; markets and supply: varieties and uses of refinery and 
other products of oil and gas. Addresses by oil and gas prodii' 
and other experts. Prerequisite: Geology 13. 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00; Assistant Professor Pkk k. 112 M H 

97. Oil and Gas Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Calorimeter tests on oil 
and natural gas; the testing of lubricating oils; determination of 
cosity and flashing points; the analysis of gases; tests on the absorp- 
tion and compression methods of deriving gasoline from natural | 
etc. Prerequisite: Chemistry 16. Geology 13. 

Second semester; F., 8:00 and 2:0^; Associate Professor Caludi, 
119 M. H. 

NOTE: For further information regarding engineering geology 
see pages 170-172. 



y8 West Virginia University Catalogue 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Professor Truscott. 

1. Elementary German. (5 Hrs.) Pronunciation, grammar, read- 
ing of simple prose. Thomas's Grammar; Super's Reader; Grimm's 
Maerchen. (Omitted in 1919-20). 

First semester; 9:00, 19 W. 

2. Elementary German. (5 Hrs.) Continuation of course 1. Read- 
ing, dictation, elementary composition. Immensee; Hoeher als die 
Kirche; Holzwarth's "Gruss aus Deutschland;" Truscott and Smith's 
"Elementary German Composition." (Omitted in 3919-20.) 

Second semester; 9:00; 19 W. 

3. German Prose and Composition. (5 Hrs.) Reading of prose 
by modern authors; translation of English into German; grammar; 
dictation. Truscott and Smith's "Elementary German Composition." 

First semester; 10:00; Professor Truscott, 19 W. 

4. German Poetry and Composition. (5 Hrs.) One long poem 
and one drama; well known short poems. The work in composition 
will be a continuation of that in course 3. "Hermann und Dorothea"; 
"Wilhelm Tell"; Hatfield's "German Lyrics and Ballads." 

Second semester; 10:00; Professor Truscott, 19 W. 

5. Germany and the Germans. (3 Hrs.) A course of general 
information about the- country and the people. Aus vergangener Zeit; 
Lodemann's Germany and the Germans; Tower's Germany of Today; 
Boles's Deutsche Wirtschaft (Omitted in 1919-20). 

First semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Professor Truscott. 18 W. 

6. Advanced Composition. (2 Hrs.) Translation; dictation; gram- 
mar. Bronson's Colloquial German; Osthaus's Prose Composition. 

First semester; T. Th., 8:00; Professor Truscott, 18 W. 

7. Romantic Period. (3 Hrs.) Reading selected from the prose 
and poetry of the first half of the nineteenth century. Prose by Araim, 
Fouque, Chamisso, Eichendorff, and Immermann. Poetry by Heine, 
Platen, Schenkendorf, Rueckert and Uhland. This course is intended 
to follow course 5. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Professor Truscott, 18 W. 

8. Advanced Composition. (2 Hrs.) A continuation of course 6. 
Jagemann's German Composition. 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00; Professor Truscott, 18 W. 

9. Schiller. (3 Hrs.) Study of his life. Gedichte; selections from 
"Geschichte des dreissigjaehrigen Krieges;" "Wallenstein." 

First semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Professor Truscott, 18 W. 



TlIK ( '"I.I ! - 99 

10. Goethe. CI Bn.) Stud:- Gedich 
Leiden; Torqosto I I. 

Second - M. \V. 1' b W 

11. History of German Literature. (3 Hr> ) < >p^n tO MBlOTI 
graduate stu«! :ie history of the literature to 1741 ling and 

d of works representatlYC of the most important authors and 
peri««i- A- a hand-book Klug's Geschichte d*-r dentsehea National- 
ur will b (Omitted in I 

First mi m W. v. 10:00; Professor Tbusoott, 19 w 

12. History of German Literature. (3 HlB.) Open to MOion and 
graduate stud- ots, A continuation of course 11. Th*- h th»- 
literature from IT- al works of Goethe a: - 

ler are not considered. (Omitted In lilt-2 

Second semester; M. \v. F.. 10:00; Profeooor Tbusoott, lfl 

13. Lessing. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate 

Study of his life. Minna von Barnhelm; Emilia Gal.»tt:; Nathan der 
B6. I>aocoon. (Omitted in 1918-19.) 

hours to be arranged: i. 18 W. 

15. Modern German Drama. (2 Bri | A reading course. Pre- 
requis i iraef 1. X, 3. 4 and 5. (Omitted in 1919 _ 

First semester; T. Th.. 1:00; Professor TftusODTT, 18 W. 

16. Modern German Drama (2 Hrs.) A continuation of cour- 
(Omitted in 1919-- 

Second semester: T. Th., 1:00; Professor TBUSOOTT, 1^ W 

17. German Novel and Short Story. (2 H: • ading c 

in nineteenth century prose. Prerequisites: 4 and 5. 

(Omitted in 1919 i 

r; T. Th Professor Tk U W 

18. German Novel and Short Story. (2 H: -ntinuation of 
course 17. (Omitted in 19U- 

Second semester; T. Th.. 10:00; Professor Tbusoott, 11 

19. Scientific German. (SHn.) Intended fo tfl in the I 
tific courses. Prereqt; | md 4 

First Mi M \V. F.. 11:00; Professor TBUSOOTT, IS W 

22. Scientific German. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of course 19. 
Second semest-r: M W F.. 11:00; rroffcsBOl TBUSOOTT, II 

24. Heine. (3 Hrs.) Readines from his prose and po» 
students who have had the fir- of German. The tirade of 

work is the same rman 5. 

First semester; M W. F.. 8:00; Professor Tbi-scott. 1- 



100 West Virginia University Catalogue 

GREEK. 

Professor Bishop. 

1. Elementary Greek. (5 Hrs.) White's Beginning Book. Greek 
Boy at Home. 

First semester; 11:00; 23 W. 

2. Elementary Greek.. (5 Hrs.) Continuation of course 1. 
Second semester; 11:00; 23 W. 

3. Xenophon's Anabasis. (4 Hrs.)* 

First semester; M. T. Th. F., 10:00; 23 W. 

4. Selections from Lucian; Homer's Odyssey. (4 Hrs.) Goodwin's 
and Monroe's Grammars; original exercises. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; 23 W. 

7. Plato's Apology, Krite, and Euthyphro. (3 Hrs.) Hadley-Allen's 
Grammar; original exercises. 

First semester; M. W. F., 9:00;' 23 W. 

8. Demosthenes On the Crown. (3 Hrs.) Hadley-Allen's Gram- 
mar; original exercises. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 9:00; 23 W. 

11. Thucydides. (3 Hrs.) Goodwin's Moods and Tenses; Gilder- 
sleeve's Syntax. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; 23 W. 

14. Euripides' Ion. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate stu- 
dents. Goodwin's Moods and Tenses; Gildersleeve's Syntax. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; 23 W. 

15. Greek Literature in Translation. (2 Hrs.) The Odyssey of 
Homer. Sophocles' Tragedies. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; 23 W. 

16. Greek Life and Religion. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; 23 W. 

20. Greek Mythology. (2 Hrs.) 
First semester; M. F., 9:00; 23 W. 

17. The New Testament in Greek. (3 Hrs.) Selected portions of 
the Gospels read, as circumstances may direct. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; 23 W. 

18. The New Testament in Greek. (3 Hrs.) Selected portions of 
the Acts and of the Epistles read, as circumstances may direct. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; 23 W. 

19. Comparative Philology of the Aryan Family. (2 Hrs.) 
Both semesters; T. Th., 3:00; 23 W. 



Tin; ( lOLLEGl OF ARTS \n:> S. D N 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

Professor Caiiaiiav i'raiVssor CHITWOon, . 

■. and Mr. I! 

The work offered In this department Indodes: (1) Continents] 
European HJ IngUsh Eiistor: .md 

1 4) Political B I 

Instruction Is iriv. n by lectfl -book w«.rk. assigned 

lateral r of papers, syllabi, and DO vial 

reports, recitation-, and In* p 

Students are encouraged to i tnd to read Contemp 

history and politi 

An afternoon hour is de> >r conference and for direction 

of library work. 

Continental European History. 
Students who select continental European history as their prin- 
cipal study are advised to take at least one year in French or 
in the early part of the Univ. : 

10. History of Ancient Civilization. (3 Hrs.) Open to freshmen. 
A brief survey ..f the civilization of the Orient and a more inter. - 
study of the political and social life of the Greeks. (Omitted in 1919- 

First semester; M. W. F.. S:<»o; Professor Chi. . L. 

11. History of Rome. (3 Hi> D to freshmen. The aim of 
this course is to trace the development of Roman institutions, char- 
acter, and civilization, to explain the genius of the Roman peopl- 
organization and government, and to call attention to the contribu- 

• >f Rome to modern civilization. 
Second semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Profe— ..r CHTl .1 L. 

12. Mediaeval History. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for freshmen. 
course becins with the period of institutional chaos following the 
break up of the Roman empire, and ends with the rise of modern 
states. Political history except in the case of France, is subordinated 
to the study of social and economic institute 

First semester; M. W. F. 8:00 and M W. F.. T': 1 "; Mr. H: 

14. Modern European History. (3 His ) Primarily for freshmen. 
The Reformation and the relig; -. the revolt of the Netherlands 

and the rise of the Dutch republic -he period of 

French ascendency, the revolutionary and Napoleonic eras, the period 
of reaction, the unification of Germany, and Italy, and the pr _ 
democracy in the nineteenth century. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 8:00: and M W F 
20 L. 



102 West Virginia University Catai^gue 

13. The Renaissance and the Reformation, 1300-1648. (3 Hrs.) 
The development of the forces of modern civilization; survey of the 
economic, political, and intellectual conditions at the close of the 
middle ages; the Renaissance in Italy and Germany; the Protestant 
revolution in the principal European states; the counter-reformation; 
and the religious wars to the Treaty of Westphalia. 

First semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Chitwood, 20 L. 

15. Continental Europe in the Nineteenth Century. (3 Hrs.) 
Open only to seniors and graduate students. This course is devoted 
to an intensive study of political and social conditions in the more 
important states of Europe with emphasis on the period from 1815 
to 1871. The results of extended reading are presented in the form of 
papers and reports. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 10:00; Professor Chitwood. 20 L. 

16. Seminar in European History. (2 Hrs.) For graduates; open 
to seniors with the consent of the instructor. 

First semester; hour to be arranged; Professor Chitwood. 

44. The French Revolution and Napoleonic Era. (3 Hrs.) A 
survey of the facts of European History from 1648 to 1789, with em- 
phasis on the causes of the French Revolution; and an intensive study 
of the great political, social and military movements from 1789 to 1815. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Mr. Higby, 20 L. 

45. Current European History. (1 Hr.) A study of current his- 
tory and politics in Europe and the East. 

First semester; T., 10:00; Professor Chitwood, 20 L. 

46. Expansion of Europe, 1500-1914. (3 Hrs.) An advanced course 
tracing the expansion of European people into Asia, Africa and Amer- 
ica, and the effects of the expansion on Europe. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:30; Mr. Higby, 20 L. 

50. Contemporary Europe, 1870-1919. (3 Hrs.) This is a modified 
form of the War Issues Course formerly offered to members of the 
Student Army Training Corps. It covers the political and social his- 
tory of the leading European countries since 1870 with emphasis on 
those events and conditions that led up to the Great War; the diploma- 
tic correspondence that immediately preceded the outbreak; reasons 
for America's entrance into the war; outline of the events of the war; 
and a study of the peace negotiations. Prerequisite: A knowledge of 
the outline facts of European history from 1815 to 1870. 

First semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Professor Chitwood, 21 L. 



The Collegi 






English History. 
Stu<. 1 find it convt-nit nt to own IdHW and I'uli. .. 

tionary of Snellen History end Gardiner*! M 

Con 19 Mid 2" furnish :< good foundation fol 

study of American history and law. 

17. History of England to the Tudors. ( :; Hn 

men. A course in t: I and institutional history «'f Bntf 

Special attention is given to political, eco n omic and BOd*J life and 
development; the moi 'ant subjects in constitutional hi-' 

are considered, showing how England learned to govru h« r 
Fir-' : : M W. P., 10:00; Mr. Hi..i:y. 2" L. 

18. History of England from the Tudors to the Present Time. 
(3 Hrs.) A continuation of 00 upbuilding of the British 
empire; constitutional and n A the sixteenth and 
seventeenth centuries; economic and social charges; international re- 
lations; struggle for colonial and commercial supr and the 
formation of modern conditions and instituti 

Second semester: M. W. F Mr. Hi.,i:y. 21 L. 

19. English Social and Industrial History. (3 Hrsi A sui \ • 

the facts of social and industrial evolution and their relation to 
political history and the interpretation of present conditions; a <tudy 
•■^f the enlargement of English life and the growth of En-lish insti- 
tutions. 

First semester; M W. F.. 11:""; Mr. Hi« i:y. 21 L. 

20. English Historical and Practical Politics: English Constitu- 
tional Law and History. (2 Hrs.) A seminar course ar: 

ially for advanced students in history' who desire a suitable prepara- 
tion for courses in American government and law. Prerequisite: a 
general outline knowledge of English history and 0OWTM IT. 18 or 19. 
First PC mooter; T. Th., 11:00; Mr. Hi. -my. 21 L. 

American History. 
All students of American N hi>tory should have Channing and 
and Sheperd's Historical . v I 

21. American Colonial History. 1492-1776. (3 Hrs.) Primarily 
for freshmen. European back-ground ; discovery and Battlement; crowth 
of the English colon: \nglo -Fn nch colonial confl ;>'ion 
of European civilization to Amen 1 development of 
new institutions; relation of the colonics to England; and the separa- 
tion. 

First semester; M \V F. 10:00; Professor CHITWO0D. 21 L 



104 West Virginia University Catalogue 

22. The Formation of the Union: American Political History, 
1776-1829. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for freshmen preparing for law. Spe- 
cial attention is given to political and constitutional development and 
to international relations, but economic and social conditions are also 
treated. 

First semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Professor Callahan, 21 L. 

23. Division and Reunion: American Political History Since 
1829. (3 Hrs.) A continuation of Course 22. Primarily for fresh- 
men preparing for law. The growth of sectional differences, culminat- 
ing in the secession movement; the Civil War; progress since the War; 
development of resources and readjustment; a brief survey of the 
political and social questions of the country. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 9:0*0; Professor Callahan, and Pro- 
fessor Chitwood, 21 L. 

NOTE.-^Courses 22 and 23 are fundamental and should be taken 
in regular order. Students who can take only one course should regis- 
ter for course 22. 

24. Reconstruction and Later American History. (|2 Hrs.) Condi- 
tions in the southern states in 1865 and the problems and conditions 
of reconstruction. (The struggle between congress and the president 
over reconstruction, negro suffrage and white disfranchisement, mis- 
government during reconstruction and the overthrow of the recon- 
struction governments and the undoing of reconstruction). Social, 
economic, and political conditions and changes in the United States 
from 1865 to the present time. 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Callahan, 21 L. 

25. American Expansion Policy. (2 Hrs.) For graduate students. 
Hours to be arranged; Professor Callahan. 

26. History of American Diplomacy and Foreign Policy, 1776-1909. 
(2 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate students who have credit 
for History 22 and 23. The fundamental principles of American 
policy; a study of the most important phases of American interna- 
tional relations; America's influence on international law and diplo- 
macy; the state department and its most distinguished secretaries. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Callahan, 21 L. 

29. American Social and Economic History. (3 Hrs.) Primarily 
for freshmen. This course furnishes a proper basis for college courses 
in American history and economics. Beginning with the European 
conditions which led to exploration and colonization, the student 
traces the chief factors in American growth and expansion from 
simple agricultural communities to the complex industrial and com- 
mercial organization of today. 

Second semester; M. W. F.. 11:00. and T. Th. S., 11:00; Professor 
Chitwood, 21 L. 



Thk COLLBOI AND S« ; 

31. Latin-American History. The chi» ■: and Ubs* 
development of the Latin D countries from the era of m 
ment to the present time, with emphasis upon their recent dlpiOD 
relation- Dy int* r-Ain. irioaa >. Effort will be made to under- 
stand the problems now before the Latin-A: 

edge of Spanish will be useful in this course). 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; Prof. —or Caiiaii.w, SI L. 

32. History of West Virginia. (1 Ilr.) A gl Qi : . '. 
industrial and political development. C ible attention 
to railroad development and the growth of towns. 1 1 

for freshmen. 

Pit Th.. i":'"»; professor Caixabai SI L 

34. Seminar in American History. (2 Hrs.) I 
supplemented by lectures. Primarily for graduate Stud Mng 
history ms their major. Proper attention is given to scientific mats 

of historical research, construction, and interpretation. Theses in 
American history arc prepared in connection with this work. 
Second •: Professor Callahah, 22 l. 

Historical Conference. 

Both semesters; 3:00; Profes«.r Callahak, 81 L. 

The attention of students taking American History is invited to 
the announcements of the Bryan prize and the Tax Commission prize 
on page 50. 

Political Science. 

In all these courses, students should have a clear knowledge of the 
outlines of general history and especially of modern political history. 

35. American Practical Politics: Government at Work. <2 ' 

A practical study of the actual workings of the government and 
politics of the United States, both state and national. Special atten- 
tion is given to the realities of government and institutions and 
the personal interest and personal action which underlie constitutions 
and statutes. Open to students who have a familiar knowledge of the 
period covered by courses 22 and 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; Professor Callahak, El L. 

36. European Historical and Practical Politics. (2 His.) The de- 
velopment of the political institutions, constitutional governments, and 
parties of the leading countries of modern continental Europe; recent 
European politics. Open to advanced students who have had thorough 
Courses in European history, especially course 14. 

Second semester, T. Th.. 11:00; Mr Ha 



106 West Virginia University Cataukjik 

37. State and Local Government. (1 Hr.) A study of governmental 
institutions and problems and political methods, with especial refer- 
ence to the state and community activities of West Virginia. 

Second semester, Th., 10:00; Professor Callahan. 

40. Municipal Government. (2 Hrs.) Second semester. 

42. Anglo-American Historical Jurisprudence. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
seniors and graduate students. A study of the sources and growth of 
law and the development of legal institutions in connection with social 
and political history. Adapted especially to advanced students of 
history who are preparing for the study of law. (Omitted in 1919-20.) 

First semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Callahan, 21 L. 

43. International Law and Practice of Diplomacy. (2 Hrs.) Open 
to seniors and graduate students with a knowledge of modern history, 
especially courses 22 and 23. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Callahan, 21 L. 



HOME ECONOMICS. 

Courses in this subject are offered both in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and in the College of Agriculture. For a detailed description 
of these courses see page 222. 



ITALIAN. 

For courses in this subject see under Romance Languages, page 
125. 



HORTICULTURE. 

Credit will be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for courses 
2, 3 and 13 in horticulture offered in the College of Agriculture. For 
detailed announcements of these courses see page 125. 



The Colli ge of Abxs an - 

LATIN. 
Pr> n SADAT and 

Cour- - '. - and 4 may be offered for 

coll- - r entrance win !>• 

wit! three units will b»-::in with' I, and U 

four units with ■". Additional conn mntlng 

<-n the amount off* n 

making Latin th- ; .r major will also tak- \ : md 11 

101 

1. Cicero. (4 Hrs. or if offered to r- 

one-half unit.) Primarily tor freshmen offering two unit- for en- 
trance. The first three oratio: 'jui- 
site: two units of hi^'h school Latin. 

■ 

2. Cicero. (Credit same ai in course I.) Continuation of course 
1 The ora- I are the fourth oration aga :ne. the 
oration for Archias. and the Manilian law. Prer Latin 1. 

Second sem- U W. 

3. Virgil. (Credit same as in course 1.) Primarily for h 
men offering three units for entrance. The first three books of the 
Aeneid are read. Composition once a week. Prerequisite: Latin 2. 

First semester; M. T. Th. F. Hani 12 W. 

4. Virgil. (Credit same as in course u Continuation of course 
3. Books four, five, and six are read. Prerequisite: Latin 3. 

Second semester: M. T. Th. F.. 1:00; Professor Ham, U W. 

5. Cicero — De Senectue and De Amicitia: Livy XXI. (5 Hrs.) 
Open to students who have had the preceding <»r four units of high 
school Latin. 

First semester; 9:00; Professor Camrai w. lfl W 

6. Livy XXII and Horace — Odes and Epodes. (5 Hrs ) Con- 
tinuation of cour- rtioular att« ntion to the B Horace. 

-tyle and his philosophy of life. 

Second - ' w n \ DAT, U W. 

12. Ovid — Metamorphoses. (3 Hi- in rapid re. 

with a discussion of the meaning and sources of the myths read. 
First aei If. w. F. 11:00; Profe> U W. 

8. Comedy. (I Hrs.) F. Plautus and Terence. 

Study (»f characters, development of plot, etc 

:id semester; M \v. F. 11:00; Profc— oi Caniianai 11 



!08 West Virginia University Catalogue 

9. Teachers' Course in Latin. (2 Hrs.) A discussion of Latin in its 
relation to modern languages, questions of style, methods of translation 
and other matters that concern the prospective teacher of Latin. 

First semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Cannaday, 18 W. 

10. Teachers' Course in Latin. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of 9. 
Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Cannaday, 18 W. 

11. Horace — Satires and Epistles. (4 Hrs.) Selected satires and 
epistles are read, with attention to Horace's personal life. 

First semester; M. T. Th. F., 10:00; Professor Cannaday, 18 W. 

17. Roman Life and Customs. (4 Hrs.) A study of the Romans in 
their homes, their intercourse in business and professional life. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Cannaday, 18 W. 

18. Outlines of Latin Literature. (3 Hrs.) The representative 
writers of the different periods will be discussed in some detail and a 
considerable amount of parallel reading will be required. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Cannaday, 18 W. 

LAW. 

Candidates for the regular A.B. degree may elect not more than 
fifteen hours of law. Candidates in the combined A.B. and LL.B. 
course may count the entire first-year work in law for credit toward 
the A.B. degree. For description of courses, see page 234. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE. 

Mr. Arnett. 

1. Library Methods. (2 Hrs.) An introductory course for the 
purpose of acquainting students with the University Library and the 
practice of library methods; instruction in the use of catalogues, in- 
dexes, and general reference books, and in the selection and purchase 
of books. 

First semester; T. Th., 8:00; L. 

2. Library Methods. (2 Hrs.) Theory and practice of library 
methods, including elementary cataloguing, classification, binding and 
repair of books, loan desk, etc. 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00; L. 

MACHINE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. 
Credit not to exceed fifteen hours in all will be given in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences for courses 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28 and 30 
in mechanical drawing, course 26 in descriptive geometry, courses 27 
and 29 in mechanism and machinery and courses 46 and 47 in indus- 
' trial management offered in the College of Engineering. For detailed 
announcements of these courses see pages 160 to 164. 



Ti; 

MATHEMATICS 
Professor Eikm.am>. rtoff—or H K 

Courses 9, 10, 11 and 12 are required of those who choo- 
matics as a major subject. Courses 9, 10 and 11 il .mended 

for those whsoe major is ph>>: 

1. Algebra. A four-hour course for which DO Ut is 
given, intended primarily for freshmen who enter with a condition in 
mathematics or who cannot make I rd in course 8. If 
offered to remove entrance condition a credit of one-half unit is given. 

First semester; T. W. Th. F.. 9:00 and 11:00: MlM HoBKirSACK, 
225 M. H. This course is repeated the second semester if a suffi< ' 
number of students apply. 

2. Solid Geometry. (4 Hrs.) (If offered to remove entrance 
conditions, one-half unit.) This course includes also a ^hort rev 

of special topics in algebra, such as radicals, equations of the first 
and second degrees, etc. 

First semester; M. W, Th. F., 8:00; Mi- H0HEH8A< k ._:. M H. 

Second semester; M. W. Th. F. ( 11:00; Miss Hobfns.uk. 126 M. H. 

3. Advanced Algebra. (3 Hrs.) Radicals, and theory of - 
Dents, imaeinaries, craphic algebra, logarithms, infinite series, ele- 
mentary theory of equations with Horner's method, etc. Prerequisite: 
One and one-half units of algebra. 

First semester; M. W. F.. 8:00, 9:00 and 11:00; Piofesi am. 

11 M.. Professor Hodgson, 10 M., and IflM Hokknsack. 225 M. H. 
Second semester; 9:00 and 11:00; Miss Horf\»a. k. .25 M H. 

4. Plane Trigonometry. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: algebra through 
quadratics. 

First semester; T. Th., 8:00, 9:00 and 11:00; Professor Eifsiam>, 
11 M., Professor HoOGSOIf, 1" M.. and Him HcaBnSACK, US M. H. 

Second semester; T. Th.. 9:00 and 11:00. 

5. Plane Analytic Geometry. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: courses 3 
and 4. 

Second semester; M. W. F.. 9:00; section one. Professor Kifm \m>, 
11 IL; section two, Professor Hodcs. M H. 

6. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. (2 Hrs.) This cour- 
a continuation of courses 3 and 4 and includes topics in plane tr 
nometry and advanced algebra and also application of spherical •: 
nometry to elementary problems in astronomy. 

Second semester; T. Th., 1:00; section one. Professor BUBLAXB, 
11 M.; section two, Professor Honr.s. M H. 



HO West Virginia University Catalogue 

7. Differential and Integral Calculus. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
courses 3, 4, 5 and 6. 

First semester; M. W. F., conference hours, T. Th., 8:00; Pro- 
fessor ElESLAND, 219 M. H. 

8. Differential and Integral Calculus. (3 Hrs.) This course is a 
continuation of course 7. 

First semester; M. W. F., conference hours, T. Th., 8:00; Pro- 
fessor Eiesland, 219 M. H. 

NOTE. — In courses 7 and 8, the part of each denoted as "Con- 
ference," two hours weekly, is not intended to increase the amount 
of prepared work. It really amounts to two hours weekly of study in 
preparation for the regular class recitation with the help and guidance 
of the teacher. Attendance at these conferences is required just as 
in the case of regular recitations. 

9. Differential Equations. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: courses 7 and 
8 or 7 and 14. This course is especially recommended to those who 
expect to take up advanced work, such as physical chemistry, mathe- 
mathical physics and theory of electricity. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 10:00; Professor Eiseland, 219 M. H. 

10. Theory of Determinants and Analytic Geometry of Space. 
(2 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite: courses 
5, 7 and 8. 

First semester; M. W., 3:00; Professor Eiseland. 219 M. H. 

11. Advanced Topics in Calculus. (2 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T. Th., 3:00; Professor Eiseland, 219 M H. 

12. Projective Geometry. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate 
students. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 4:00; Professor Hodgson, 225 M. H. 

13. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. (5 Hrs.) 
First semester; 11:00; Professor Hodgson, 225 M. H. 

14. Differential and Integral Calculus. (5 Hrs.) Continuation of 
course 13. 

Second semester; 11:00; Professor Hodgson, 225 M. H. 

NOTE. — Courses 13 and 14, which are intended for science as 
well as for engineering students, are equivalent to courses 5. 7 and 8. 



The ( - "ii i 

Undergraduate Courses in Applied Mathematics. 

22. Mathematics for Agriculture and General Science. (J 

Primarily for students of agriculture and biological -<■•• d - 
course includes such topics as the foUowin 
algebra, graphic methods, logarithms, trig"' md land 

iriii. calculation of errors, annuities, law.- o! heredity, probsbil I 
requisite: One year's work In elementary 

First semester; bonn to b< M H 

23. The Mathematical Theory of Investment. (2 Mrs.) Prin 
for students of economlCfl and sociology. Tho following ar. 

the Topics treated: theory of series and logarithms, int. an- 

nuities, amortization, valuation of bonds, winking funds and depre- 
ciation, theory of probability, annuities, life insurance. Prereqnisil - 
a fair knowledge of algebra through quadra - 

Semester and hours to be arranged; Professor EiK.si.wn. 219 M H 



Astronomy. 

1. Descriptive Astronomy. (3 Hrs.) Opportunity is given to ' 
who wish to d<» sextant work or work with a portable transit. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged: Professor Eif.si .ami. 11 M 



Courses for Graduate Students. 

15. Introduction to Lie's Theory of Continuous Groups with Ap- 
plication to Differential Equations. Prerequisite: courses 9. 10 and 12 
Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit and hours to b* ar- 
ranged. Professor EStsslako, 219 If. H. 

16. Higher Plane Curves with Special Reference to Curves of 
the Third and the Fourth Order. Two hours a week throughout the 
year. Open only to graduate students. Credit and hours to be ar- 
ranged. Professor Hon at H 

17. Introduction to the Theory of Functions of a Complex Vari- 
able. Open only to graduate srudmts. Credit and hours to b. 

1 Profes-or Bim \m>. 219 at H. 

18. Higher Algebra and Introduction to the Theory of Invariants. 
Open only to graduate Students. Credit and hour- 
Professor He 5 at. H. 

19. Differential Geometry and Theory of Surfaces. Three hour- 
a week throughout the year. Bum UTO, HI M EL 



« 



112 West Virginia University Catalogue 

20. Theory of Numbers. An elementary course. Open only to 
graduate students. Two hours a week throughout the year. Professor 
Hodgson, 225 M. H. 

21. Differential Equations. An advanced course with applications; 
the algebra of vectors. Prerequisite: courses 7, 8 and 9. Professor 
Eiesland. 

MECHANICAL DRAWING AND MACHINE DESIGN. 

Credit will be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for courses 
in mechanical drawing offered in the College of Engineering. For 
detailed announcement of these courses see page 160. 

MECHANICS AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 

Credit will be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for courses 
70, 71, 72 and 73 in mechanics offered in the College of Engineering. 
For detailed announcements of these courses see page 169. 

MINING ENGINEERING. 

Credit will be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for courses 
85 and 96 in metallurgy offered in the College of Engineering. For 
detailed announcements of these courses see page 170. 



MUSIC. 

Credit not to exceed fifteen hours in all will be given in the 
College of Arts and Sciences for courses 1, 2, 3 and 4 in the theory 
of music and courses 5 and 6 in the history of music offered in the 
School of Music. For detailed announcements of these courses see 
page 278. 



Tiik College of Abts and BencNGBe IM 

PHILOSOPHY. 
PTOft BOOT S ikk ELJJ i». 

The purpose of the oonrs I in this department li 

up the field of philosophy to th. student end to bring some of the 
more important results of rational reflection into the vital relation with 
the practical probl. DM and DO dfl Of pr» 0SBt day life 

The method of instruction is through the use of appro'. 
lectures, class discussions, papers and collateral r.-ading with Written 
reports, and also assigned work in relatively Independent thinki: 
soon as the student is ready for it. The purpose ll not only that the 
student may learn the results achieved by the greet thinkers, hut 
also that he himself may learn to think with tome degree of if 
ance and indepeinl- 

1. General Psychology. (3 Hrs.) The main facts and processes of 
the mental life of the normal human person are described, and explained 
from the standpoint both of structure and function. 

First semester; M. W. F., 11:00; 33 L. 

14. The Human Mind. (3 Hrs.) The normal mental life of the 
human person is studied from the aspect both of structural elements 
and function, and emphasis is laid upon the practical value of a 
knowledge of the mind of the human individual. Some attention is 
given to illustrative tests and measurements. 

Second semester: It W. F.. 9:00; 33 L. 

2. Logic. (2 Hrs.) Deductive and inductive lopic. with practical 
exercises in the use of the logical forms and emphasis upon th« ir 
limitations. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; 33 L. 

3. Philosophy of Thought and Knowledge. (Epistemology.) (2 
Hrs.) A study in psychological and logical theory. The forms and 
fundamental principles of thought and the rational processes by which 
we build up belief and knowledge. The rational grounds of certainty. 
Prerequisite: Philosophy 1 or 2, or consent of the instructor. 

Second semester; T. Th.. 9:00; 33 L. 

4. Metaphysics. (3 Hrs.) The problem of reality is taken up and 
those basic principles which underlie all thinking arc examined criti- 
cally with the view of discovering and expounding a theory of be 

a view of nature, and a valuation of the personal self. Open only 
to juniors, seniors or graduate students who have completed course 3 
or who here otherwise prepared for work in metaphv-: ..itted in 

1919-20.) 

First semester: If. W. F.. 1:00; g| L. 

5. Personal Aspects of The Moral Life (Ethics). (3 Hrs.) The 
ethical problem and the method by which it should be approach, 
the various types of ethical th n^id. ration of the orig 



114 West Virginia Universit? Catalogue 

authority of the moral law in the developing personal life of man. and 
the function of conscience; rational principles governing conduct which 
may bo brought to bear upon the ethical aspects of current social, 
economic and political questions. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00; 33 L. 

7. History of Philosophy. (3 Hrs.) A study of the principal 
problems of systematic thinking, their rise and development in Greek, 
Roman and mediaeval life. The effort is made to present the various 
systems in relation to the historic movements of the periods to which 
they belong. 

First semester; M. W. F., 10:00, 33 L. 

8. Modern Philosophy. (3 Hrs.) A continuation of course 7. 
This course offers a brief study of the work of the great philosophic 
thinkers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 10:00; 33 L. 

9. Contemporary Philosophy. (2 Hrs.) A more intensive study 
of the more important philosophic movements of today. Realism, prag- 
matism, the philosophy of Bergson, personal idealism, and the theistic 
monism of Eucken and Bowne; character of the philosophic thinking 
which underlies present noteworthy movements in science, sociology 
and religion. Open to those who have had course 4 or courses 7 and 
8. (Omitted in 1919-20.) 

First and second semesters: hours to be arranged; 33 L. 

10. The Story of Early Religion. (2 Hrs.) Primitive religious 
beliefs, practices and forms of worship; the question of the origin of 
religion on the human side, so far as it can be treated by the his- 
torical method; com<mon elements of meaning in all religions which 
point to an underlying unity; brief study of several of the great non- 
Christian religions. 

First semester; T. Th., 11:00; 33 L. 

11. Philosophy of the Christian Religion. (2 Hrs.) A rapid survey 
of the growth of Hebrew religion; the origin and growth of early 
Christianity; consideration of some of the great fundamental Christian 
beliefs from the philosophic point of view. The object is to present in 
outline a philosophy of Christianity which shall be in harmony with 
modern thinking and so to point the way to intellectual foundations 
for religious faith. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; 33 L. 

12. Philosophy Seminar. (2 Hrs.) A more intensive study of some 
problem of philosophy as preparation for the writing of a dissertation 
or thesis. 

Semester and hours to be arranged. 



Till. I "<»l.l.l Q] 






PHYSICS. 

Prof r u - v qqo -. . .:. a —.-tanr Professor Colwull and Mr Jollt 

ri; !',,: description ol the phj sical Ian 

The rarious oour 

lent* in the Colleger oi Arts snd - 
tore, and Engineering, and In the School ol Medici] 
who expect to teach physic* the laboratory 
uai • work and the construction of a; 

laoorator] $2.00 for in which laboratory wort 

given. 

1. Introductory Physics. (3 His.) Primarily for freshmen. 

quired of students in the College of Agriculture, and r 

for all students in the College of Arts and Sciences who elect phy 
from the science group. The con: on Kimball'! 

Physics and presents the fundamental principles of physics and their 
application to every day life. See course 2 below. Prerequisite: p 
geometry. 

First semester; lectures; M. w.. B:0b; Professor R 
Quiz sections, Th.. B:00, F. 8:00, or F.. 9:00. 

2. Introductory Physical Laboratory. (1 Hr.) This COUr* 
companies, and is required of all students who take course 1. 
course consists of individual, quantitative determinations of the var 
physical constants, and occupies one laboratory period per week. 

First semester; section one. T. I & tion two. Th.. 2:00; section 

for agricultural students, Th.. 10:00-12 mor C«> 

wki i and Mr. Joi urn. 

3. Introductory Physics. (3 Hrs.) A continuation of cou: 
which is a prerequisite. See course 4 below. 

Second semester; lectures; section one, M. W., 8;00; Professor 
mm, m : Quiz sections; Th., 8:00, F., 8:00, or F.. 9:00. 

4. Introductory Physical Laboratory. (1 Hr.) A continuati 
course 2, which is prerequisite. 

Second semester; section one. T.. 2:00; section two. Th.. I 
rion for agricultural Students, Th.. 10:00-1200: Assist .nt Profei 

Ooi wn i and Mr. Joi unf 

5. Introductory Physics. Credit according to the amount of work 
done. A continuation of courses 3 and 4. Recommended for those 
expect to teach physics in secondary schoo 

:■>. 4 and trigonometry. 
Hours to be arranged; Mr. joi i ir< r 



116 West Virginia University Catau>gue 

6. General Physics. (4 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for en- 
gineering degrees, and recommended for all students in Arts and 
Sciences who elect physics from the science group. The derivation 
of the mathematical statements of the laws of physics and their appli- 
cation to the solution of engineering problems. Prerequisites: ana- 
lytical geometry and one full unit of entrance physics. See course 7 
below. 

First semester; T. W. Th. F., 9:00; Professor Waggoner, M. 

7. General Physical Laboratory. (1 Hr.) Primarily for engineering 
students. This course accompanies and is required of all students who 
take course 6. No student will be permitted to enter this course until 
he has presented to this department a satisfactory note book such as 
is specified in the entrance requirements of the University. 

First semester; section one, for M. E. students, M. 9:00-11:00. Sec- 
tion two for C. E. students, M., 2:00-4:00; Assistant Professor Colwell. 

8. General Physics. (4 Hrs.) A continuation of course 6 which 
is a prerequisite. 

Second semester; T. W. Th. F., 9:00; Professor Waggoner, M. 

9. General Physical Laboratory. (1 Hr.) A continuation of course 
7, which is a prerequisite. 

Second semester; section one for M. E. students, M., 9:0i0-ll:0O. 
Section two, for C. E. students, M., 2:00*4:00; Assistant Professor Col- 
well. 

10. Electrical Measurements. (4 Hrs.) This course is designed 
for, and required of the candidates for the degree of B.S.M.E., and 
B.S.E.M. It consists of the study of photometry, magnetic properties 
of materials, the theory, calibration, and use of various electrical in- 
struments. Prerequisites: Physics 6, 7, 8 and 9, and integral calculus. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:00; laboratory, W., 2:00-4:00; Professor 
Waggoner, M. 

11. Radio-Telegraphy. (4 Hrs.) This course consists of the study 
of the modern methods used in radio-transmission of intelligence. 
The department has a small installation for wireless telegraphy 
which is used as a basis for the laboratory study of various systems 
of transmission. Students are expected to spend one evening (8:00- 
11:00 p. m.) each week in the laboratory in addition to the regular 
required laboratory work. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00; laboratory, W., 3:00-5:00; Pro- 
fessor Waggoner, M. 



The Collegk of Arts and Son 



117 



12. Photography. (2 Hrs.) Open to all students <>t the l'm\. I 

One lecture and on.' labor a tory exercise per week. The rimpl 

of photography; making lantern slides, micro-photographs and I 

traits. Students will be expected to purchase the necessary BOnpl 

Second semester; lectures, Th., 4:00; laboratory, hours b 
ranged; Assistant Professor Coi wi 1 1 . 

16. Advanced Physical Laboratory. This work i.- indi\idual and 

the credit depends upon the amount of work done. Pre* las measure 

m< nts in physics. Open to students who ban oompletsd physic ,; ~ 
8. 9 and integral calculus. 

Semester and hours to be arranged; Professoi Wai I <»mi:. a ssist a n t 
I Hi wi i i and Mr. Joi i n i r. 

18. Heat. (4 Hrs.) Lectures and laboratory; thermometers and 
pyrometers, electric furnace construction, quantitative determination 
of the various heat quantities, and the melting and boiling pofnti 
various metals and fluids. Prerequisites: Physics 6, 7, 8, 9, and inter- 
gal calculus. 

First semester; at W. P., 11:00; laboratory. T.. 2:00-4:00; Pro 
r Wacconer. Iff. 

19. Heat. (4 Hrs.) A continuation of course 18 which is a pre* 
requisite. 

Second semester; It W. F., 11:00; laboratory. T., 2:00-4:00; Pro- 
fessor Waggons, Iff. 

22. Light. (4 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate students. Let 
tures and laboratory work. A photometric and spectrophotometry study 
of light sources; artifical Illumination; the various optical lens 
tems; spectrum analysis and the polarlscope Prerequisite: Pin 

6. 7. 8, 9 and integral calculus. 

First semester; T. Th. F., 11:00; laboratory. T. 8: (MM: 00; as- 
sistant Professor Coi wi i i 

23. Light. (1 Hrs.") Open to seniors and graduate Student! A 
continuation of course 22 which is a prerequisite. 

Second semester; T. Th. F.. 11:00; laboratory T., 2:00-4:", \ 
distant Professor Coi wi 1 1 . at 

25. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. (1 Hrs.) For gradute 
students only. Lectures and laboratory work. Th. leotures will b€ 
based on Starling's Electricity. Prerequisite: Phy- s. and 

Integral calculus. 

First semester; T. Th. F. 11:00; laboratory, t. 1:004:00; Pro 

fessor WAGOONnu, M. 



118 West Virginia University Catalogue 

j6. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. (4 Hrs.) For graduate 
students only. A continuation of course 25 which is a prerequisite. 

Second semester; T. Th. F., 11:00; laboratory, T., 2:00-4:00; Pro- 
lessor Waggoner, M. 

27. Theoretical Mechanics. (3 Hrs.) For graduate students only. 
A study of the general methods of mechanics; Lagrange's Equations, 
the Hamiltonion function and rotating bodies. Prerequisite: Physics 
6. 7, 8, 9 and differential equations. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; Assistant Professor COL- 
WELL, M. 

28. Theoretical Mechanics. (3 Hrs.) A continuation of course 27 
which is a prerequisite. The second semester's work will take up the 
theory of vibrations, small oscillations and the stability of types of 
motion. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Assistant Professor COL- 
WELL, M. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. 

Professor Simpson and Professor Arkin. 

1. Physiology. (5 Hrs.) For students in the College of Arts and 
Sciences who do not care to go into the details of medical physiology. 
Not open to freshmen. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1 and 2. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. 

First semester; M. T. Th. F., 10:00; Laboratory, W., 2:00-5:00; 
Professor Simpson, M. B. 

9. Hygiene and Sanitation. (2 Hrs.) Required of juniors in the 
home economics course. Not open to freshmen. This course considers 
the principles of hygiene and sanitation as they pertain to the welfare 
of the individual, and the care of the public health. 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00; Professor Arkin, M. B. 

10. Hygiene, and Sanitation Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Open to a 
limited number of students who have taken or are taking course 9. 
Experiments in bacteriology as it relates to hygiene and disease pre- 
vention. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Second semester; W. F., 2:00-4:00; Professor Arkin, M. B. 

3. Sanitation. (2 Hrs.) Sources and quality of water 'supplies; 
construction of water supply and sewerage systems; plumbing, heating 
and ventilation of residences and school buildings. Control of water- 
borne infectious diseases. (Omitted in 1919-20). 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00. 



The College op Arts *nd fi ll: ' 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

Professor \i □ . 

The purpose of this department li to prepan students for the 

work ol public speakers and readers; to train students to teach n 
lug and public speaking In schools and colleges; and to 
Btudents as do not expect to be professional sp e a kers , to get the gr< 
lota good From tin printed pag< and I themseJ 

in an easy and manner. 

1. The Causes of Effective Speaking. (3 Hrs.) A practical Btudj 

df the principles of psychology ss employed in tin derelopmenl 
Imagination, conception, memory, and emotion tor speech. 

Fir>t sen* st. r; M. \Y. P., 11:00; 14 YV 

2. The Causes of Effective Speaking. C'. Mrs.) Continuation of 

coarse l An application of the principles oi psychology to the develop- 
ment of voice and action in speech, and in the ttnconSCiOOi 
pause, change of pitch, inflection, subordination, movement, tone- 
texture, and touch. Prerequisite: course 1. 

Fir>t semester; If. W. v., hours to be arranged; 14 \v 
Second s. mester; If. W. F. 11:00; 14 W. 

3. Literary Analysis. Synthesis and Rendition. (2 Hrs.) 
supplementary study for students who have completed courses 1 

and t. Analysis of psychological elements in short English 
synthesis of these elements into original thinking and feeling, and 
effective delivery of the selections studied. Prerequisites: com 
1 and 2. 

First s< nnster; T. Th.. 11:00; 14 W. 

4. Advanced Synthesis and Rendition. (2 His.) A continuation 
<>urse :'. A literary analysis, synthesis and rendition of st 

iture not Studied in course .".. including more difficult s. 'lections. 
»t< r: T. Th., 11:00; 14 W. 

5. Dramatic Study of Shakespeare. (2 His ) A psychologica] anal- 
S of tin setting, the characters, th- plot and the purpose of oi.' 

Shakespeare's comedies; synthesis o! tin-, elements Into and 

effective acting; memoriter presentation of the plays studied (Omitted 
in 191*>2< 

lemesti r; T. Th., li :00; 14 \v. 

6. Dramatic Study of Shakespeare. (3 Hrs I \ continuation of 
hte actional study outlined in course :,. \ ghal 

studied. (Omitted in 1919 - 

Sfc r: T. Th.. 11 :00j 14 VY 



120 . West Virginia University Catalogue 

7. Dramatization and Adaptation. (3 Hrs.) Open to students who 
have completed courses 1 and 2. A study in adapting short stories 
for public presentation. An examination of the qualities which fit a 
story for public use. Original adaptations required of each student. 
Practical training in the presentation of these. 

First semester; M. W. F., 9:00; 14 W. 

8. Dramatization and Adaptation. (3 Hrs.) A continuation of the 
study begun in course 7. Original work in dramatizing a novel. Prac- 
tical training in the presentation of the story dramatized. 

Second semester; M. W. P., 9:00; 14 W. 

9. Vocal Interpretation of the Bible. (2 Hrs.) Designed for ad- 
vanced students in literature. The object of this course is to teach the 
student the literary worth of the Bible, its narrative, didactic, alle- 
gorical, dramatic, oratorical, lyric, and epic spirit. This is accom- 
plished through psychological study and vocal rendition of Biblical 
selections. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; 14 W. 

10. Extempore Speaking. (3 Hrs.) Analysis of noted extempore 
speeches; subjects appropriate for extempore speaking; presentation 
of speeches before the class. 

First semester; M. W. F., 10:00; 14 W. 

11. Extempore Speaking. (3 Hrs.) A continuation of course 10. 
Second semester; M. W. F.. 10:00; 14 W. 

12. The History of Oratory. (2 Hrs.) A study of the sources, 
characteristics, and results of the great periods of oratory. A study 
of the individual work and worth of the most noted orators. Exten- 
poraneous reports on these subjects by the students. (Omitted in 
1919-20.) 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; 14 W. 

13. Original Orations. (2 Hrs.) Designed to follow course 12 
and to give the student thorough fundamental training in writing and 
presenting a formal speech. A study of the sources of clearness, ele- 
gance, force and persuasion; development of these in the individual 
student. (Omitted in 1919-20). 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; 14 W. 

14. Argumentation and Debate. (2 Hrs.) A study of the laws of 
argumentation; training in the statement and analysis of subjects for 
debate; training in gathering and tabulating material for proof; train- 
ing in construction of briefs and writing of arguments; oral presenta- 
tion of short arguments and debates. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:00; 14 W. 



The Colli - 1L>1 

15. Advanced Argumentation and Debate. (2 B 

our-- 14. Critical study of note.l f argumentation ; 

research work on live questions of the day; writing of bri.-fs and 

arguments on these questions; extempot md debar 

Second semester; T. Th.. 10:00; 14 W 

16. The Teaching of Reading and Speaking. (2 Hrs.i 
those who have completed ours-- 1. | and 3. 1 as a sp- 
training for those who expect to teach public sp.-aklng. and for tt 
who expect to teach reading in the high - 

First semester; Iff. F.. hours to be Arranged*; 14 \V. 

17. The Teaching of Reading and Speaking. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
those who have completed conrsea 1 8, S, and 18. Practical training 
in the teaching of more advanced courses in reading and spear 

Second semester; M. F., hours to be arranged; 14 W. 

18. Actional Study of Modern Drama. (2 Hrs.) Open to those 
who have successfully passed the competitive contests in dramatics. 
An Intensive study of one modern play and a public presentation of 
the play studied. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; 14 W. 

19. Actional Study of Modern Drama. (2 Hrs.) Open to T 
who have completed course 18. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; 14 W. 

20. Actional Study of Modern Drama. (2 Hrs.) Open to those 
who have completed course 19. 

Second semester: hours to be arranged; 14 W 

RAILWAY AND HIGHWAY ENGINEERING. 

Credit will be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for 
courses 100 and 101 in land surveying offered in the College of En- 
gineering - ge 173. 



122 West Vibginia University Catalogue 

romance languages and literature. 

Professor Statu krs. Associate Professor Darby, Assistant Professor 
Cheydleub, Mr. Provost, Mr. Rky and Mr. Whiting. 

French. 

1. Elementary French. (5 Hrs.) Grammar, reading and composi- 
tion. Stress is laid on the pronoun and verb. Constant practice in 
pronunciation and oral understanding. Fraser and Squair's French 
Grammar. 

First semester; sections, M. T. W. Th. F., at 8:00, 9:00, 10:00 and 
11:00; Associate Professor Darby, Associate Professor Cheydlettr and 
Mr. Provost. 

2. Modern French. (5 Hrs.) A continuation of course 1. Gram- 
mar, reading, composition and oral understanding. Fontaine's En 
France, Laurie's Memories d'un Collegien, Bruno's Le Tour de la 
France. 

Second semester; sections, M. T. Th. P., at 8:00. 9:00, 10:00, 11:00; 
Associate Professor Darby, Assistant Professor Cheydleur and Mr. 
Provost. 

3. Fiction of the Nineteenth Century. (3 Hrs.) Reading and 
study of representative works from Merim6e, George Sand, Victor 
Hugo, Alphonse Daudet, Guy de Maupassant, Paul Margueritte, Pierre 
Loti, Anatole France. 

First semester; first section. M. W. P., 8:00; Mr. Provost, 19 W; 
second section, M. W. F„ 10: 00; Associate Professor Darby, 14 W. 

4. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (2 Hrs.) Detailed study 
of the parts of speech and review of verbs. Composition and dictation 
based on matter illustrative of the work. Given in connection with 
course 3. 

First semester; first section, T. Th., 8:00; Mr. Provost. 19 W.; 
second section, T. Th., 11:00; Assistant Professor Cheydleur. 13 W. 

5. France and the French. (3 Hrs.) Study of the country from 
a commercial and geographical standpoint; Parisian and provincial 
life; conversation in French on questions of popular interest; collat- 
eral reading and reports. 

Second semester; first section. M. W. F., 8:00; Mr. Provost, 19W.; 
second section, M. W. F., 10:00; Associate Professor Darby, 14 W. 

6. Drama of the Nineteenth Century. (2 Hrs.) Reading and 
study of several plays chosen from the works of Alfred de Musset, 



The 

:,]ou. UMnaltr*. Roetan 

connection with course 5. ^ 

g 
secor mwMlw. 

7 The Classic School. (I H: - 

„f the origin and development of classic literature and t h€ Iitm t»d 
works of th. om the Pleiade to M 

: rigs and - ..~.-». 

P^. •! W. F ant Professc- '^ 

8 The Classic School after Moliere. (3 Hn minuatioo of 

course 7, comprising the study of fr. - r.tng authors *n- 

teenth century and the principal authors of tfc- - 
Essays, collateral reading and reports on related top. - 
the period. 

mm w V c-rtA- A«s»Utant Prof^^or CHETDIEUB. 
M. W r.. ^.W, Assistant rtui-^i 

9. French Syntax and Conversation. (1 Hn.) Careful review of 
the parts of speech and study and application of them Dy mean 
original Knfc l I -nation based on anecdotes and short st 
both original and from text! 

rat semester; T. Th.. »:••; Prof- - - hers. 11 W. 

10. Advanced French Discourse A COB) 
co Ur . . g and application of idiomatic cons - 

equire facility in ex;- ■ writing and in speaking. 

Paraphrasing and discussion in French based on ■• mo<i- 

Second semester; T. Th.. •:••; Pro- war 8 11 W. 

ii of the preceding course- 
to courses 111 -- which. H a in 
oh. 

11. The Romantic Movement. (3 Hrs .) I. 

d e v line of rom. :dy of represent 

works of the first half of the nineteenth c-ntury. Essays, collateral 
g and rep< I 

M. \V. F " w 

12. French Literature since 1850. (3 Hrs.) Careful 

different lit ips and schc period, critical reading of 

:ative works of the leading authors and lectures on wmt. 
of special int- - 

Second MM* I M 






West Virginia UxivxRsrrY Catalogue 



13. The Novel in France. (* Hrs.) Origin and development of 
— t It. : :: :: i- : ::-;ir.^:z :: :-::^ :i.. r ~:r>i :': ~ :it 
eaifieat ifyumi to the present time. Lectures, essays and reports. 
(Omitted 191»-2tL) 

T. Th. !•:#•; Associate Professor Dabbt. 14 



14. French Lyric Poetry, if Hrs.) Critical reading of represen- 

>" - - - ---- "•"---:; m:.:-. .,- : 

I-.-rS ii: -:7£; :■: :- T '.riiir : --.5 i": :':t:: rr: .:- 
(Omitted 191*-**.) 

■; T. Th, !•:•*>; Associate Professor Dabby, 14 W. 




.= £;- . =■-.--- r-=-= : 1-1:5 ::-z :: 5-ri ::5 in: rr-iiM--^ 
."r .._ : :!■= :::r_i :.i Ti.7.7 It t :::zt-_: :::.-r "ir M - 
1; stndy of representatiTe dramatic 




: M. W. F_ 11:M; Professor StAraEas. 11 W. 



(3 Hrs.) Open to se- 

:: :::_--;- 11: ::::ci::: :::- 
lied by a systematic reriew of French syntax. Pho- 
■ : - _ - ; 
semester: 1L W. F- 11:»»: P rofe s s or Statheks 11 W 



17. Contemporary French Drama, (2 Hrs.) Lectures on the 
- ~:-: :- "ijT .:- L-f.-rr_:-= 11: ."- ~: ~ 
=.- . r - : : : ~ - : r_ r-: 1 :: :ri ~ 1 :: : ::::"::::: r_ = 
Pint semester: T. TTl_ 1*:0*; Associate Professor Dabby. 14 W. 



Nineteenth Century Literature. (2 Hrs.) This 

11 : - - :: ■ : :*--r r--=r: - 

- - - - - : — - : =-r — : r'£ 

7 Th., l»:tt; Associate Professor Dakbt, 14 W. 







-■ 



- :~ *il 




22. - tfce Middle Aoes. 

• - - - 





E 

mar and I Lilian Header. (On 
semester: 11:0*; 

32. Modem Italian. 

"j :- :'.is* ::' M ••:■:•. - I 
m o d em asthors. 

- 

-. . - - - - 

-:::' ; : -- - :• - ~ •: : - - -.::-- = 





41. Elementary 



- - 

^•:-: ;- - ■ :: • Mr 7- ~- :• 

42. Modern Spanish. 

- - -. : , -.;^ -_,• - 











126 West Virginia University Catalogue 

44. Classic Drama and the Age of Cervantes. (3 Hrs.) Critical 
reading of selected works of Lope de Vega and Calderon and of ex- 
tracts from Cervantes' Don Quijote de la Mancha. Papers on the 
lives, works and times of these authors. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Professor Stathebs, 11 W. 

45. Drama of the Nineteenth Century. (2 Hrs.) Reading and 
study of some of the principal works of such modern Spanish authors 
as Moratin, Nunez de Arce, Echegaray, Ayala, Avellaneda. 

First semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Stathebs, 11 W. 

46. Spanish Composition and Conversation. (2 Hrs.) Themes 
based on phases and incidents of daily life. Conversation and narra- 
tion based on anecdotes and short storiss both original and from texts. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

47. Early Spanish Drama. (3 Hrs.) Open only to graduate stu- 
dents. Study of the drama from its most remote origin to the time 
of Lope de Vega; reading of works illustrating its early development. 
(Omitted 1919-20.) 

First semester; M. W. F., hours to be arranged; Professor 
Stathers, 11 W. 

48. Early Spanish. (3 Hrs.) Open only to graduate students. 
Study of the literature in the first centuries of its development, read- 
ing of the Cid. (Omitted 1919-20.) 

Second semester; M. W. F., hours to be arranged; Professor 
Stathers, 11 W. 

STEAM AND GAS ENGINEERING. 

Credit will be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for courses 
121 in thermodynamics, 122 in heat engines, and 127 in heating and 
ventilating offered in the College of Engineering. For detailed an- 
nouncements of these courses see page 175. 



Tin: Colli qi i 

ZOOLOGY. 

:• iin -i and Assistant r Hi n i 

\, ,i | Iption of loological Lai 

The courses Id this department are Intended to 
of genera] ouituri and to prepare Btndente to 
and teachers of Ecology a aide field li offered for bn In 

the organization, innct ions, habits, and evolution of animal Life I 

out rest to a large extent the ><•:•: 
of medicine, psychology, and aodolo 

iai Interest to teachers. Courses l and I inired of -• 

ring to enter the study of medicine. 

1. Animal Biology. (4 His.) A study chiefly of Invertebrate an 
imals. with an introduction to U aratei 

Zoology. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

First semester; recitation, T. Th., 8:00; or T. Th., 1:00; lab 

ti.ry. first section (primarily for students In agriculture). M. W 
2:00-4:30; second section. T. Th.. 2:00-4:30: third section. F.. 2:00- 
4:30; S., 8:30-11:00; Professor Rbbbe, assistant Professor Him and 
tilts. 49 and ~>0 W. 

2. Vertebrate Zoology. (4 Hrs.) Dissection of the dogfifib, I 
and cat. Lecture and recitations upon the bi<dogy. comparative ana 
toniy. and evolution of vertebrates. Prerequisite: Zoology 1 or an 
equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Second semester; recitation, T. Th.. B:00; or T. Th.. 9:00; labora- 
tory, first section (primarily for students in agriculture i . M. W. - 
4:30; second section. T. Th., 2:004:30; third section, F., 2:0O-4:3o 
8:30-11:00; Professor &EK8E, assistant Professor Hint and assistants. 
49 and 50 W. 

6. Vertebrate Embryology. (3 Hrs.) Clef -nulauon am 1 

the formation of germ layers are studied in the frog and chick; th- 
development of organs in the chick and pig. Tins.' materisJa 
supplemented by sections and cleared preparations of human em- 
bryos. Reese's Vertebra n- Embroyology. Prerequisite ff an 
equivalent. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

First semester; T. Th.. 2 : 00-6: 00 j Professor Ri urn, W W 

9. Methods of Zoology. (2 or :'- His.) A practical OOUrse in the 
methods of collecting, preserving. Injecting; making microscopic | 

arations. etc. Lectures and laboratory work. Prerequisite: cour- - 
1 and 2 or an equivalent. Laboratory fee, $:>.00 to $5.00. 

First and second semester; M. W . B: 00-10: 00 (for l' hrs. »; St W 
F., 8:00-10:00 (for 3 DTS.) m» Hi m. :.l \V 






128 \Vest Virginia University Catalogue 

10. Principles of Biology. (3 Hrs.) This course deals with the 
conditions of animal life; habits, reactions, food relations, regenera- 
tion, etc.; the course of organic evolution; eugenics, etc. Lectures, 
recitations and assigned readings. Lull's Organic Evolution. Prere- 
quisite: Zoology 1 or an equivalent, except by special permission. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Reese, 49 W. 

15. Comparative Anatomy, Histology, and Embryology. (Credit in 
proportion to work done.) An advanced course; to be taken ordinar- 
ily only after all of the preceding courses have been completed. Lab- 
oratory fee $3.00 to $5.00. 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Reese and Assistant Professor Hunt, 51 W. 

19. Current Literature. (1 Hr.) Open to seniors and graduate 
students. The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student 
with the character of the work that is being published in the best 
known American and foreign zoological journals. 

First and second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Reese, 51 W. 

20. Research Work. (Credit in proportion to work done.) Prop- 
erly qualified students may undertake research work upon the anat- 
omy or physiology of animals. Primarily for graduates. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00 to $5.00. 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Reese and Assistant Professor Hunt, 51 W. 

21. Economic Zoology. (2 Hrs.) A brief survey of the more im- 
portant representatives of all the groups of animals that are econom- 
ically beneficial or injurious to man. Lectures, recitations, assigned 
readings and laboratory study. Reese's Economic Zoology. Zoology 
1 and 2 advised as prerequisite, but not required of upper classmen. 

Second semester; T., 11:00; Th., 10:00-12:00; Professor Reese, 

50 W. 

22. Animal Histology. (3 Hrs.) An advanced course in which a 
study is made of invertebrate and non-mammalian vertebrate tissues. 
Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Prerequisites, Zoology 1 
and 2 or equivalents. Laboratory fee. $3.00. 

First semester; M. W. F., 8:00-10:00; Assistant Professor Hunt, 

51 W. 

NOTE. — For courses in entomology see page 210. 



THE COLLEGE OF 

ENGINEERING AND 

MECHANIC ARTS 



THE FACULTY. 
\.\K BUTLER TROTTER. AM, LL I>. V tideni of tl 

CLEMENT ROSS JONES. B.S.CE . MME Dean and Pro/efcaar of 

Poic r Bngi 

FREDERICK LINCOLN EMORY. B.&, MME. ME. Pro/etfOf of 
M- ind Applied Math' tnatics 

RUSSELL LOVE MORRIS, C ay Md II <;> 

Bngim i ring 

ROLAND PARKER Davis. MCE. Fii n.. / Structural and 

H fdrawii Bngi 

JOHX BEHXY GRUMBEIX. M.M.K Miin Md B*peH- 

mmtal Bngim • ring 

ALEXANDER HARDIE FORMAX, MME.. Ph.D.. P 
irical Bnginei ring 

ALFRED COPELAXD CALLEN,' EM. M.S., P 

gi> 

EDWARD XATHAX ZBRN, PS. EM. 7 M tfntin* Engx- 

■ ni<J 

IUE DAVID HAYES. PS. ME. M.E.. Pro/eMOT 0) ofec*** 7><si0n 
Consti < u< tion 

ARTHUR ADAMS HALL. B.S.M E 

Engin ee r ing 

SIMEOX THOMPSON* HART. ME ,,1 Mmcl 

Construction ami Superintend* <>p* 

GEORGE WALTER GROW. B.s M E ssor of D 

hin<- Dc*xgn 



On U 



130 West Virginia University Catalogue 

RUFUS ASA WEST, Instructor in Metalworking and Stationary 
Engineer 

RAYMER EGBERT SEAMAN, Instructor in Woodworking and Foundry 
Practice 

ROBERT Z. VIRGIN, Assistant Director of Mining Extension 

ELWOOD G. LIMPRECHT, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Drawing and Ma- 
chine Design 

HARRY EDWARD GRAY, Instructor in Mining (Extension). 

HUGH ANDERSON, Instructor in Mining (Extension). 

THOMAS J. BLAIR, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Surveying 

ARTHUR K. BRAKE, 1 B.S.E.E., Instructor in Surveying 

OTTO HAZELTON HENRY, Student Assistant in Steam and Experi- 
mental Engineering 

MARY LOUISE OONAWAY, A.B., Secretary 

WILLIAM OLIVER GNAGEY, Mechanician 



ALEXANDER REUD WHITEHILL, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

SAMUEL B. BROWN, A.M., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy 

JOHN ARNDT EIESLAND, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

OHAUNCEY WILLIAM WAGGONER, Ph.D., B.S.C.E., Professor of 
Physics 

JOSEPH ELLIS HODGSON, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

FRIEND EBENEZER CLARKE, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

DAVID DALE JOHNSON, A.M., Associate Professor of English 

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG PRICE, JR., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Geology 

HUBERT HILL, M.S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 



Resigned, December 7, 1918. 



The Colli ra of Abts and - r;1 

BAMUEL MORRIS, ma. Aatitteftl P "f Okemit 

ROBERT CAMERON" ("OLWKLL. PaD . Atffetaftl P P*fflfi 

CHARLES BYRON JOLLIFFE, B.S., Instructor In 
GLABICE HOBBNBACK, l: si: itani In ]fafJh4 

CLAIRE FISHER. Stu<l>„t Assistant m Math- >f>ati> * 

FACULTY COMMITTEES. 

Siiiumv' C0UB8K8 \M' Houbs: Dean JONES and Pr BRUM 

BBIN and FORM AN. 

EN..i\n kin.. cu;iti.ii\: Dean JONES, Profesaon morris, davis. 

FORMAX. CALLKX and HAVES. 

E-Nc.iNKKKixG Society: Professors EMORY. MORRIS. ORUMBEIN, 

FORMAX, and Associate Profeeaor JOHNSON 
Lihbary: PTOfeeeor DAVIS and HATES 



132 West Virginia University Catalogue 

ORGANIZATION. 

The College of Engineering contains the following departments: 

Chemical engineering. 

Electrical engineering. 

Machine design and construction. 

Mechanics and applied mathematics. 

Mining engineering. 

Railway and highway engineering and surveying. 

Steam, gas, and experimental engineering. 

Structural and hydraulic engineering. 

Industrial education. 

Summer school of mines. 

School of good roads. 

Mining extension. 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT. 

All instruction in engineering subjects is centralized in Mechan- 
ical Hall. This building is located on the southeast corner of the 
campus and fronts the athletic field. 

In the wing are commodious and well lighted drawing rooms 
and shops; recitation, laboratory and model rooms for the departments 
of geology, machine design and construction, and electrical engineer- 
ing; offices for the State Geological Survey, a mining museum and 
an additional mechanical laboratory. In the main building are the oil 
and gas laboratory, the mining and highway laboratory, the electrical 
laboratory, departmental drawing rooms for advanced students, addi- 
tional lecture rooms, and offices and drawing rooms for the State 
Road Commission. 

In the drawing rooms are collections of models of bridges, fur- 
naces, structures, mechanisms, engines, pumps, valves and valve 
gears; descriptive geometry models; sets of charts, state and govern- 
ment maps, surveys, photographs, engineering specifications, draw- 
ings, tracings, and blue prints. In connection with the drawing rooms 
there is a blue printing and photographic room and dark closet, 
equipped with electric and sun printing apparatus and photographic 
outfit. 

The shops consist of a woodworking shop, forge shop, foundry, 
machine shop, sheet metal, and pipe fitting shop. Each work shop 
occupies a separate room and is independently equipped with suitable 
benches, measuring instruments, tools, shop appliances, and machines, 
such as are ordinarily installed in the larger engineering colleges and 
commercial shops. These afford ample facilities for performing all 



Till, < ': ENGIN1 : 






the fundament*] operation* in machine construction an«l for boll 
machines of moderate size. 

The power plant equipment consists of different types of It 
and gas engines, direct connected Of belted to • 

100 k. \v Westlnghoose conden.- i m turbine direct-conne* 

to a direct current generator; a 50 h. p. moiOT-gener a t01 
boilers, equipped for burning both gai and coal; an Independently 
fired superheater equipped with temperature controller; pumps, con- 
densers, air compressors, steam traps and Other auxilia: itOS, 
providing the means for furnishing any desired kind of power. 
The engineering laboratories are supplied frith itandar 

measuring, calculating, and recording instruments; apparatus and .ip 
pliances for qualitative and quantitative experimental work in civil, 
mechanical, steam, hydraulic, electrical and mining ensineeri: 

The testing laboratory is equipped with apparatus and machine- 
for testing cement, iron, steel, brick, stone, and other materia' - 
engineering. The principal machines and apparatus are an I >lsen 
testing machine of 400.000 pounds capacity, taking tension and I 
pression specimens up to six feet, and beams up to sixteen feet in 

length; a 50,000 pound Riehle testing machine; a 20, pound liiehb 

automatic and autographic testing machine; a 10.000 pound Olsen 
transverse testing machine; a 60,000 inch-pound Riehle-Miller torsion 
machine; one Olsen and two Fairbanks cement testers; Brinnell and 
Shore hardness testers: a standard abrasion cylinder; a stone saw 
besides smaller apparatus for testing cement, lubricatine oils. an<! 
extension and deflection of materials. 

The mechanical and steam laboratories contain small steam ant: 
gas engines, a compound air compressor with electrical and mechani- 
cal control, Westinghouse air brake apparatus, rotary air motor- 
hot air engine, a passenger locomotive, direct steam driven ventilat- 
ing and power driven fans, dynamometers, friction brakes, con- 
densers, injectors and ejectors, steam and gas engine indicators, n 
lution counters, planimeters. anemometers and apparatus for testin. 
pressure causes, indicator springs, thermometers, V-nturi meters and 
nozzles for measuring flow of air and steam, etc These are supple- 
mented by the power plant equipment previously described. Sfl 
affords facilities for steam and cas engine trials and boil. \ith 

larger units, and also provides facilities for various lin 
mental investigation. 

The electrical laboratory is provided with a number of small com- 
pound, shunt and >und direct current venerators and mo- 
ranging from 2 1-2 to 20 kilowatt, two and three-phase alternating cur- 
rent generators and motors of f r»« ; rod 
capacities rancine from 2 to 20 kilowatt; rotary OOOTerter and m 



134 West Virginia University Catalogue 

generator sets; an 8-horse-power variable speed Stow motor, driving 
a 5-kilowatt, 2-phase, 220-volt, 10 pole alternator, which may give any 
frequency from 40 to 133 cycles; a 3-horse-power inter-pole motor; 
a 3-horse-power Thompson-Ryan variable speed motor, which, driving 
a small alternator, affords frequencies from 15 to 60 cycles; a revolv- 
ing field, 7 1-2 K. W. General Electric alternating current generator, 
wound to give from one to twelve phases; a Holtzer-Cabot, 5-horse- 
power induction motor set with interchangeable motor; a 5-horse- 
power Lamme series, single-phase motor; a 3-horse-power self-start- 
ing, Century, single-phase induction motor; a 5-horse-power General 
Electric, split-phase motor; a 10-horse-power Stanley 2-phase induc- 
tion motor equipped with compensator, condenser, and transformers; 
a 10-horse-power Sprague electric dynamometer; a 30 ampere General 
Electric Mercury-Arc Rectifier and storage battery equipment; va- 
rious types of Cutler-Hammer and other speed regulating and control- 
ling apparatus; reactances, static, auto and constant-current trans- 
formers; a welding transformer; a high potential transformer for 
testing insulation, etc.; a Thodarson set of experimental apparatus 
for demonstrating many of the principles of electricity; a Queen & 
Co.'s testing set, with standards of capacity, induction and resistance, 
and with a potentimeter and standard cell, for standardizing electrical 
instruments; a General Electric oscillograph with accessories; stan- 
dard and commercial indicating and recording measuring instruments; 
synchronism and power-factor indicators; dynamometers; fluxmeter; 
galvanometers; tachometers and speed counters; rheostats of various 
types and capacities; and eight distributing switchboard panels. The 
electric railway equipment consists of a car truck, with motors, 
mounted on a dynamometer: air brake outfit; three types of control 
equipment and a switchboard panel with indicating and recording 
instruments. This is supplemented also by the larger generating and 
controlling units in the power plant. 

The hydraulic laboratory equipment consists of a compound 
duplex steam pump supplying water to a closed steel pressure tank, 
from which run headers arranged for the insertion of orifices, nozzles, 
and pipes supplying the various hydraulic motors; concrete storage 
tanks; measuring tanks and weighing scales; cascade water wheel; 
Venturi meter, water meter, steel weir-box, weir-gauges, and other 
minor measuring and controlling apparatus. 

The road material testing laboratory equipment consists of stand- 
ard abrasion cylinder for testing paving brick; a standard three- 
gang motor driven Deval abrasion cylinder; motor driven ball mill; 
briquette machine; core drill; motor driven grinding lap and stone 
saw; motor driven "Dorry" hardness testing machine; standard Page 
impact tester, with anvil for cementation tests; road-making tools. 



The Colli Bnotnebbd 

Braun planetary pulverizer; Dulin roterex; motor driven ttoTC shaker. 

etc. 

The mining laboratory is equipped with drills, coal CUtl 
chinerv, air recerfer, etc.; leading types Of mine I 'us 

pulmotor. smoke chamber for use in training with :• 
devices for demonstrating the explosibility of coal dust, the William 
Clifford-James T Beard collection of safety lamps, device for showing 
the length of cap with varying percentage! of methane in mine air, 
models showing methods of working anthracite and bituminous seams 
of coal, small mine fan for expermu in the study of mine ven- 

tilation, recording barometer, hygrometer, etc. 

The metallurgical laboratory is .specially equipped for the study 
of fuels, such as coal, coke, gas and oil. In part it comprises analytical 
balances .mbination zas furnace, electric drying oven, WJ 

still. Emerson and Parr fuel calorimeters, apparatus for the anal; 
of gases, apparatus for the proximate analysis of coal and for deter- 
mining the coking properties, etc. 

The oil and gas laboratory is provided with equipment for 
determining the physical and chemical properties of oils and p 
as follows: Junker calorimeter. Emerson calorimeter. Saybolt Stand- 
ard Universal viscosometer. Tensky-Martin flash point apparatus, 
colorimeter, apparatus for heat test, fire test, cold test and emulsion 
test: Baume hydrometers; apparatus for the determination of carbon 
iue in oils: the estimation of gasoline content per 1000 cubic feet 
of natural gas. etc.. etc. 

Transits, levels, compasses, etc., are provided for the use of 
students in land and mine surveying and in highway and railway 
construction. 

The latest trade literature catalogues, and reports of comm. 
developments in engineering are kept in classified files for stud- 
reference. The University library has a thoroughly classified and 
indexed collection of the standard and latest books in engineering 
and the allied sciences, complete bound sets of the transaction 
several scientific and engineering societies, and currem issues and 
bound volumes of the principal scientific and technical periodicals. 



136 West Virginia University Catalogue 

FACILITIES FOR PRACTICAL OBSERVATION. 

The University is located in a region which affords the student 
unusual opportunities for practical observation and education in 
engineering. Morgantown is situated practically at the edge of three 
extensive coal regions; the Fairmont, the Deckers' Creek and the 
Connellsville fields. The nearest large workings in the Pittsburgh coal 
seam are within a mile of the University, and the nearest in the Upper 
Freeport vein are only four miles away. Connellsville is only forty- 
five miles distant from Morgantown, and Pittsburgh, the center of 
the world's greatest iron and steel industries, is 103 miles distant. 

West Virginia's gas and oil districts approach within four miles 
of Morgantown and supply fuel for numerous factories. There are 
extensive brick works; twelve glass factories, producing pressed, 
plate, cut, window and bottle goods; two pumping stations, the Pure 
Oil Company's plant to the north of the city and the Standard Oil 
Company's plant to the south; the Sabraton plant of the American 
Sheet and Tin Plate Company; the Morgantown and Kingwood Rail- 
road Shops; the Chrisman and Goodwin Foundry plant; the Mor- 
gantown Printing and Binding Company, and the factory of the Bar- 
ley Foods Company. 

At Manheim, on the M. & K. R. R., is located the Manheim Port- 
land Cement works with a capacity of 1200 barrels a day; at Greer, 
an extensive limestone crushing plant, and at Sturgisson, the leading 
glass sand industry of this section. 

ENGINEERING SOCIETY. 

The Engineering Society is conducted by the students of the Col- 
lege of Engineering under the direction of a faculty committee. The 
society meets bi-weekly for the discussion of scientific subjects. All 
engineering students are urged to join the society immediately upon 
entrance to the college and to perform such work as its rules require. 
Students taking any of the four-year curricula leading to the bacca- 
laureate degrees in engineering are required to engage actively in 
the work of the society during the third and fourth years. A credit 
of one hour will be given for the work of each of the last two years. 



The ( '"i.i.i 01 oi Bnginkung ' " 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

For admission to the College of Engineering, the candidate i 
have credit for fifteen units, obtained by examination or on certiffc 

from a duly accredited secondary school. 

1. Engllah: students are admitted to the rreahmen elaaw 

English on completion of a tOOT-year high school course in Bngl 
or its equivalent, and receive credit for three or four units.* 

2. Foreign Language: Two units of one language are required 

3. Mathematical One unit of algebra, one unit of plane gi 

and one-half unit of solid geometry are required 

4. History: One unit la required. 

5. Science: One unit of physics with laboratory is requir- 

6. Elective: Enough is required from the following list to com 
plete 15 units: 

Drawing (free hand and mechanical) __1 to 2 units 

Fiench 1 to :: 

German 1 to 3 

Latin 1 to 1 

Greek 1 T 

Mathematics h to 11 

Social science (including history, civics 

and economics) 1 to 3 

Vocational subjects (including agriculture, 
commercial subjects, household arts, 
and manual training) 1 to 3 

Other subjects which have a recognized place in the first -clas.- 
high schols will also be accepted by the Committee on Entrance 
Students who have completed an accepted four-year high school courae, 
even if they have not taken the specified work, will be admitt* 
an opportunity will be given to make up the required work later. !n 
exceptional cases, students who are deficient in foreign Ian 
may be required to make up only such deficiencies as can be arranged 
along with the regular four-year com 

For a detailed statement of the amount of work required for 
each unit of entrance credit to 64. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING. 

Students from other institutions will be given credit for I 
already done in accordance with the general rules for advanced ttand 
ing. but at least one year of resident work will be required for any 
of the baccalaureate d o gr ooi in engineering. 



•Four unit,* will in schools in which \\w »■ 

■arrieit through tOVJ f':l: y.-:ir« «:)•! tt*» tostrurt 

prepared in English and baa do wort - 



138 West Virginia Univebsitt Catalogue 

ADMISSION AS SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Students desiring to take special work in the College of En- 
gineering and Mechanic Arts are required to conform to the general 
regulations of the University regarding special students. (See page 
3 2 ) 

Such students must give satisfactory evidence that they are pre- 
pared to take the desired studies advantageously; but if they sub- 
sequently desire to become candidates for a degree or to take a regular 
curriculum in engineering, they must pass the required entrance ex- 
amination for that year. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

To be classified as a freshman in the College of Engineering a 
student must have credit for at least twelve units of entrance require- 
ments; to be classified as a regular freshman he must have fulfilled 
all entrance requirements. To be classified as a sophomore he must 
have credit for twenty-six hours of college work; as a junior, sixty- 
four hours; as a senior, one hundred and four hours. 

CREDIT FOR WORK DONE IN ABSENCE. 

Students of the College of Engineering under exceptional circum- 
stances are permitted to apply for advanced standing for not more 
than a total of six hours credit for practical work in the following 
subjects done in the field, shops, or drafting room, during vacation or 
other periods of absence from the University: woodworking (courses 
1, 2 and 3), pattern making (4), foundry practice (5), forging (7), 
shop work (9), pipe fitting (10), machine tool work (13 and 14), ma- 
chine construction (15), electrical construction (18), mechanical draw- 
ing (20, 22, 24 and 25). 

To obtain credit application must be made before the work is 
begun, and a daily record kept of the work done. A certified state- 
ment of work done signed by the employer accompanied by a full 
report prepared by the applicant, must be filed with the Dean of the 
College on or before October 1st. Rules of procedure and application 
blanks may be obtained from the Dean. 

In order to obtain credit for Summer Practice 164, the same rules 
of procedure apply. 



Till. ( JOLU 01 01 ENGINEER] 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA. 

The following curricula ire offered tor undergrade 

in the College of Engineering: 

i. a four-year curriculuui leading to the degree of Bachel< 
Science in civil Engineering, with option In aanltarj ring. 

2. a four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachel< 

Science in Mechanical Engineering. 

3. A four year curriculuui leading to the i helor Of 

Science In Electrical Engineering. 

4. A four year curriculum leading to the d< 

QCe in Engineering of Mines, with options In COal mining ami 
oil and gas engineering. 

5. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Chemical Engineering. 

6. Combined science and engineering curricula extending over 
five or more years leading to the degrees of Bachelor of S and 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering. 

7 A four-year curriculum in industrial education leading to the 
ee of Bachelor of Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES. 

To receive any of the baccalaureate degrees conferred in the 
College of Engineering the student must have satisfied all the en- 
trance requirements and must have received credit for one hundred 
and forty-eight semester hours, including a summer term equivalent 
to five semester hours, three of which shall be in residence and two 
hours in outside practice. The particular curriculum and distribution 
of work is prescribed for each degree as stated below. 

No student is permitted to register for less than fifteen or more 
than twenty hours of work in any one seme- 

THESES. 

Every candidate for a baccalaureate or graduate degree in en- 
gineering will be required to prepare a. thesis on some subject relating 
to a special branch of engineering or other department Of applied 

nee. It must be fully elaborated and accompanied by the n» < 
sary working drawing or models required for the proper elucidation 
of the subject of the thesis. With its accompanying drawings it will 
he presented for approval, first to the instructor under whose guid- 
ance it has been prepared, then to the head of the department in 
which the degree is to be conferred. A typewritten ropy of the thesis, 
prepared according to official specifications for these and Signed 
by the instructor in charge and the head of the departments, must 
be placed in the University library before graduation. A small fee 
is charged for bindinp. 



140 West Virginia University Catalogue 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The course in civil engineering has been planned so that the 
student will get a substantial foundation for the work of the civil 
engineer. Emphasis is placed on the subjects underlying the science 
of engineering, such as physics, mathematics, etc., and these subjects 
are presented to the engineering students, not as an end in them- 
selves, but as a means for the solution of engineering problems. The 
professional subjects are taught by means of recitations, lectures, 
drawing room work, laboratory work and field work. 

Civil engineering includes topographical and geodetic engineer- 
ing, which has to do with the measurements of land surfaces; railroad 
and highway engineering, comprising the construction and mainten- 
ance of railroad lines and highways and the economic features gov- 
erning them; municipal engineering, comprising the construction of 
sewers, water-works, etc., structural engineering, comprising the con- 
struction of buildings, bridges, foundations, docks, walls, piers, and 
other fixed structures; and hydraulic engineering, comprising the 
development of water power, the transference of water from place 
to place, etc. The field is so broad that no man can ever become 
an expert over its whole extent, but fortunately all of these various 
branches rest upon a very small body of principles, and the student 
is not forced to specialize until he enters active practice. 

In addition to the Sanitary Option, outlined below, the student 
is offered the choice of two options in the second semester of the 
senior year, one of which devotes more time to the subject of rail- 
road and highway engineering, the other to the subject of hydraulic 
engineering. 

Optional Course in Sanitary Engineering. 

Students in civil engineering who desire to specialize in sanitary 
engineering are permitted to make the following substitutions: 

Chemistry 6, Quantitative analysis (4 hrs.) for Mechanism 29, 
(2 hrs.) and Mechanism drawing 30 (2 hrs.) in the second semester, 
second year. 

Bacteriology 3, General bacteriology, (4 hrs.) for Economic geo- 
logy 4 (3 hrs.) second semester, third year. 

Chemistry 8, Organic quantitative analysis (5 hrs.) and thesis 
(3 hrs.) for Railroad economy 107 (2 hrs.) and Advanced structures 
143 (3 hrs.) 

An additional course in Bacteriology (2 hrs.) is arranged for the 
first semester, fourth year, to take the place of Tunneling 88 (2 hrs.) 



The Collegi E ineering 



141 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. 
First Year — First Semester. First Year — Second Semester. 



Rhetoric and comp. (Kim. 1) 3 
Advanced algebra (Math. 3) 3 
Plane trigonometry (Math ,4) I 
Inorganic chemistry (Chetm. l) 4 
Ullitary aeience (D l 

Mechanical drawn | 

Shop work 9 2 



Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. I 
Anal> tlcal g< Ometry< Math 

Trigonometry (Math. • 

Land .-"■ LAO 

Inorganic chemiatry(Chem. 2 » I 
Military Science (2) l 

Mechanical drawing 22 I i v 



Second Year — First Semester 



Second Year — Second Semester. 



Descriptive geometry 21 3 

Advanced surveying 102 2 

General physics (I'hys. n. 71 '. 

Differential calculus (Math. 7) 3 

Military science (3) 1 

Qualitative analysis (Chem. 4) 2 

Mechanical drawin I I s - Mechanism drawing 30 
Summer work. Surveying 109 — 1 

Summer work (out of residence), Summer practice 164—2 



Integra] calculus (Math.. • 

General physics (Phys v. 
Topographical surveying i 

Statics 70 3 

Mechanism 29 I 

Military Science (4) 1 

I II 



Third Year — First Semester. 

Mechanics of materials 71 4 
Mechanical laboratory 130 2 
Railway location 104 3 

Strain and gas machinery 120 3 
General geology (OeoL 2) 3 

Applied electricity 51 3 

Engineering Society 162 



Third Year — Second Semester. 

Kinetics 72 3 

Hydraulics 73 

Mechanical laboratory i::i | 

Railway maintenance 105 3 

and bridges in 4 

Economic geology (Oeol. 4) 3 



18 Engineering Society 162 
Summer work. Railroad surveying 110 — 2 



1 1^ 



Fourth Year — First Semester. 

Water supply engineering 149 3 
Sanitary engineering 148 3 

Masonry and foundations 146 3 
Bridge design 142 4 

Materials of Construction 1 
Roads and pavements 100 
Engineering Society 163 I s * 



Fourth Year — Second Semester. 

'Railroad economy i«»7 

and EUghwaj ; i 

or * Hydraulic con-' : 

and Hydraulic mean. 151 1 

Contracts and sp< 

tions 161 
Concrete construction 1 17 J 

Advanced structures I I 

Thesis 113 or 152 

English (Eng. in l 

Engineering Society L( l is 



W announwl at the l^jrinnint: of tlw fourth yoar. 
For optional COUTM in Sanitary 



142 West Virginia University Catauxjue 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The aim of the course in mechanical engineering is to give the 
student such mental equipment as will enable him to deal most effec- 
tively with general engineering problems. All possible practice is 
given in the work that an engineer is ordinarily called on to do, but 
greater stress is laid on a thorough knowledge of those underlying 
principles and methods wliich are the foundation of all engineering 
professions. This study occupies the first two and part of the third 
years. The remainder of the third year and all of the fourth are de- 
voted to study of the applications of these principles and options 
are provided which will enable the student to specialize in accordance 
with his natural inclination. 

The work in pure mathematics is terminated at the end of the 
second year, and applications follow in the recitation room courses in 
mechanism, statics, mechanics of materials, dynamics, and machine 
design. Steam engineering begins with the course in thermodynamics 
in the third year and is continued by the courses in valve gears, heat 
engines and power plant design. A sufficient amount of electrical 
engineering is given in the third and fourth years to enable the stud- 
ent to handle engineering operations involving the simpler electrical 
problems. 

Drafting room work is given throughout the four years, starting 
with elementary mechanical drawing in the first year. The courses 
in mechanism, valve gears, machine design and power plant design 
are accompanied by drawing room work, giving practical applica- 
tions of the principles studied in the class room, and constant practice 
in the execution of drawings. 

The engineering laboratories provide the students with practice 
in testing, handling and caring for a large variety of machinery, in- 
cluding steam, air, gas, hydraulic, material-testing and power-trans- 
mission machinery. One-half day a week is devoted to this work dur- 
ing the last two years. 

The shop work, commencing in the first year, is planned to ac- 
quaint students with the fundamental tools and mechanical operations, 
to enable them to acquire a reasonable amount of manual dexterity, 
and to furnish them continously with practical examples of the 
principles studied in their class room. A study is made of the meth- 
ods used in manufacturing plants and engineering establishments, 
and of the principles of industrial management. 

The thorough understanding of principles, the development of the 
reasoning faculty, and the knowledge of the sources to draw on 
for engineering information as it may be needed, are of the greatest 
importance, and take precedence over the mere acquisition of knowl- 
edge. 



The < Joixi i Inoinbbrin€ 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical 
Engineering. 






First Year — First Semester. 
Rhetoric and romp. (Eng. 1' 3 
Advanced algebra (Math. I 
Plan*' trigonometry (Math. I) 2 
Inorganic chemi8try(Chem. 1> 
Military Bdence (1) 
Mechanical drawing 2" 
Woodworking l 
Forging 7 



i 

1 

•> 

1 

1 IT 



First Year— Second Semester. 

Rhetoric ami coins 
Anal] tical geometry < Math 
. 

Surreying i"i l 

inorganic chemist] 

l 



Milita: 

Mechanical l>raw;: 
Foundry 5 



_' 1* 



Summer work. Machine shop 13—3 



Second Year — First Semester. 
Differential calcolu8(Math. 7) 3 
General physics (Thy- • 
Descriptive geomet 3 

Military BCience (3) 1 

Qualitative analysis (Chem.4) I 
Mechanical drawing 
rn maKii:. 



Second Year — Second Semester 



A 



integral calculus (Math 

Genera] phj b!< b < Ph>s. s 9) 

Statics 7" 
Mechanism I 
Military Science (4> 
Mechanism drawing If 
Is Machine work 1 1 
Pipe-fitting 10 
•Summer work (out of residence). Summer practice 164 — 2 



1 
1 iv 



Third Year — First Semester. 



Third Year — Second Semester. 



Mechanics Ol materials 71 \ 

Thermodynamics 121 3 
Elect, and mag. (Phya. 1 

Valve gears SI I 

anical laboratory 130 2 

Machine drawing: 32 2 

Machine construction 15 2 
Lneering Society 163 



Kinetics 72 3 

Hydraulics 79 

Heat engines 122 

Shop methods 16 

Machine design 

Mechanical laboratory 1S3 

Machine drawing 
IS Engineering: Society lfi2 1 h 



Fourth Year — First Semester. Fourth Year — Second Semester. 



Power plant design 12:: 
Engineering laboratory 
Electrical engineering 53 

industrial management 
Steam engine design 39 or 
Adv. machine design 

Structural engineering 144 
Designing and drawing 10 or 
Designing and drawing 38 
Electrical laborator 
Ens:ineerin:r Society 163 

Power machinery !:> 
Steam turbine? 12." 
Gas engineering 126 
Hydraulic construction 



Ifl 



Contracts and spec Id 
Engineering laboratory i:: 

Elements of elect. OI| 

English (Eng. 14) 1 

Electrical laboratory 

Designing and drawing n 2 
IS or 136 

Engin eerin g Society | i 

Optional from following list :*. IS 



• ; nLT and ventilating 12 
Steam boilers 12 t 

industrial engineering \~ 



144 West Virginia University Catalogie 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

The course in electrical engineering has as its object the impart- 
ing of that theoretical and practical training which will enable the 
prospective engineer to obtain a basic knowledge of the applications 
of electricity. 

Since the electrical engineer must have the fundamental train- 
ing of a mechanical engineer with special knowledge of the prop- 
erties of electricity, the course aims to parallel as far as possible the 
instruction given in mechanical engineering and to supplement that 
training with more extended instruction in electrical theory and its 
applications. 

The work of the first two years of the course is largely prepara- 
tory to the technical training of the latter two years. It is planned to 
give the requisite foundation in English, mathematics, physics, chem- 
istry, drafting, and the elements of shop practice. Some of the funda- 
mental principles of electricity and magnetism are studied in con- 
nection with physics. 

The study of electrical engineering proper begins with the third 
year. In the first semester of this year the study of fundamentals of 
electrical engineering is begun. The theory is studied in class ^nd is 
accompanied with practical investigations and experiments in the 
electrical laboratory. In the second semester this study is continued 
to include the design, construction and operation of direct current 
machinery, and is accompanied by laboratory experiments to verify 
the principles studied. In addition to the purely electrical studies, 
the following supplementary subjects are taught throughout the year; 
thermodynamics and heat engines, mechanics, machine design and 
drawing, mechanical laboratory practice, and shop work. 

The senior year is largely devoted to a study of the various com- 
mercial applications of electrical energy. The advanced theory of al- 
ternating currents, with its technical applications, is carefully con- 
sidered. Alternating current machines, such" as generators, trans- 
formers, motors, converters, etc., are treated in detail both as to de- 
sign and performance. Instruction is given in power plant construc- 
tion and operation, in transmission and distribution of electrical 
power, in electric traction and lighting, in telephonic and telegraphic 
principles, and in hydraulics. This work is also accompanied by both 
mechanical and electrical engineering practice, the solution of prob- 
lems, and the preparing of engineering reports. The laboratory work 
is supplemented by direct inspection trips to plants of the city and 
by more extended trips to other cities. 



The I '"i.i.j '.i "i Engini bring 






UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING. 



Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical 
Engineering. 



First Year — First Semester. 



Rhetoric ami oomp. (Kik-. i | 

Advanced algebra (Math. .". ) 

Plane trigonometry (Math, n 
Inorganic chemistry(Chem. 1 1 

Military science (1) 
Mechanical drawim 
Forging 7 
Woodworking 1 



1 1 



First Year — Second Semester. 
Rhetoric and oomp. ( Bng. | 

Analytical geometn (Math. 5 
Trigonometry (Math | 

Surveying 10] l 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem 2) t 

Military science | l 

Mechanical drav. in 2 

Foundry 5 I i v 



Summer work. Machine shop 13 — 3 



Second Year — First Semester. Second Year — Second Semester. 



Differential calculus(Math. 7) 
General physics (Phy/8. 6. 7^ 

ptive geometry 26 
Military science (3) 
Qualitative analysis (Chem. 4) 

Mechanical drawing 24 
Pattern making 4 



3 
" 

3 
1 
2 

o 

2 18 



Integral calculus (Math 
General physics (Phys. 8, 9) 5 

Statics 7" 
Mechanism 27 
Military science (4) 
Mechanism drawing 28 
Machine work 14 
Pip" fitting 10 



3 

2 

1 

o 

1 

1 lv 



Summer work (out of residence), Summer practice 164 



Third Year — First Semester 



Mechanical laboratory 130 
Mechanics of materials 71 
Thermodynamics 121 
Valve gears 33 
Direct current theory SO 
Machine drawing 34 
Machine construction 15 
Engineering Society 162 



Third Year — Second Semester, 
laboratory 131 



Mechanical 

Kinetics 72 

Heat engines 122 

Direct current machinery 

Machine design 35 

Machine drawing 36 

Engineering Society 162 



2 
I 

3 

4 
3 
2 

1 18 



19 



Fourth Year — First Semester. 

Power plant design VI?. 3 

Electrical laboratory 60 2 

Engineering laboratory 132 2 

Industrial management 46 1 

Electrical light, and Big. 58 3 

Alternating current 3 

Designing and drawing 59 3 

Thesis 69 1 
Engineering Society ICfl ^ v 



Fourth Year — Second Semester. 



Hydraulii I 

Electrical laboratory 61 

Engineering laboratory 133 

Electric tract, and trail 

English (Ens, 14) 

Alt. current machiner. 

Designing and drawing 41 

Theeii 

Engineering - Iff, 



3 

1 
3 

2 

■ 

1 iv 



14 6 West Virginia University Catalogue 

MINING ENGINEERING. 

Mining engineering deals with the processes and appliances used 
in the extraction of minerals from within the earth. Not only must 
the mining engineer be thoroughly trained in mining and geology, but 
also in the application of the fundamental principles of civil, electrical 
and mechanical engineering to mining conditions. 

The first two years of the course in mining engineering are de- 
voted to a thorough training in the underlying principles of mathe- 
matics, physics and chemistry. Supplementing these are courses in 
.surveying, including mine surveying, English, drawing, and shop work. 
For the last two years of the course two options are provided, one in 
coal mining and one in geological engineering and oil and gas produc- 
tion. The student is permitted to state his choice of option at the be- 
ginning of the junior year. 

COAL MINING. 

In the coal mining option the study of coal mining is taken up in 
the third year. This study includes the geology and classification of 
coals; explosives and blasting; prospecting; shaft sinking and tun- 
neling; methods of working; haulage, hoisting and pumping; and the 
preparation of coal for the market. A course in the projection of 
mine workings and the design of mining plants runs throughout the 
senior year. A thorough course in mine gases and the ventilation of 
mines is given in the first half of the fourth year, supplemented by 
work in the mining laboratory. The course in fuels is designed to 
give the student a knowledge of the various fuels that are utilized in 
engineering practice, while the courses in metallurgy acquaint him 
with the processes used in manufacture of iron and steel, as well 
as copper, lead, zinc, tin, gold and silver. The course in mine man- 
agement presents the economic, social and financial considerations 
to be met in the successful management of a mining enterprise. 

The study of steam engineering begins with the course in thermo- 
dynamics, and practice in the handling and care of instruments and 
machinery and in the solution of practical engineering problems is 
offered in the mechanical laboratory. These courses are followed by 
a thorough study of the design of power plants, and by courses in 
electrical engineering and structural engineering. 

A training in the science of geology is afforded by the courses in 
mineralogy and general and historical geology which are given in the 
junior year. These courses are supplemented by the study of the 
economic geology of the non-metallic minerals in the senior year, 
special attention being paid to the geology of coal, oil and gas. Should 
the student desire further work in geology courses in the economic 
zoology of the metallic minerals and in field geology are offered as 
elective subjects. 



THE < JOLLl Gl IN'EERIXG 






UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN MINING ENGINEERING 
(COAL MINING OPTION) 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of 

Mines. 



First Year — First Semester. 



Rhetoric and comp. (Ener. 1) 
Advanced slgebrs (Mat 

Plant- trlgnOOM ' - h. 4) 

nie chemistry (Ch< 
Military science 
Mechanical dmrtnj 

Shop work 9 



First Year — Second Semester. 

Rhetoric and com] 

Analytical geometry (Math. 5) 3 

I .a n 

- ) 4 
Military s<i^n< • 1 

aical Drawinj 



Second Year— First Semester. Second Year— Second Semester. 



Differentia] calculus (Math. : 

ral Physics (Thy- • " 

peomer: 3 

Advanced surveying 102 2 

Military science (3) 1 

Qual. ana: (Chem. 4) 2 

Mechanical drawin- 2 IS 



Summer work. Surveying 109—1 
and Mine surveying 90 — 2 



Integral calculus (Math. 8 
General physics (Phy- 

3 

Mine survey in- 3 

Military (4) 1 

Quan. ana. (Chem. 6) 2 

Pine nttins 1 1^ 



Third Year — First Semester. 



Third Year — Second Semester. 



Mechanical laboratory I3fl 
Mechanics of material- 71 
Thermodynamics 121 
Coal mining M 
Gpn^rai Geology (GeoL 2) 
Elementary mine: 
Engineering soc • 



Kinetics 72 

4 Hydrai: 2 

1 Mechanical laboratory 131 2 
3 Coal mining 82 4 
3 

2 Metallurgy - 
17 MetaDurgica] lab. 96 1 

Eneine^rine Society If] i if 

Summer work (our of residence), Summer practice 164— 2 



Fourth Year — First Semester. 

Structural *-n::im-' rini: It; 2 
Mine Ventilation 83 
Minine P 3 

_ 
Electrical L. 
Mining laboratory 95 

The>:~ 1 

Engine* | 

•Elective*: 

Cone- -ruction 117 

Electrical ♦ nirineerinsr " 
Non-ferrous metallurgy 91 2 



Fourth Year — Second Semester. 
14) 1 



Enal> 

93 
Min^ ma: 84 

Minine P 

B 99 

Encir.- 3 ciety 1*:: 






•'.oniic gee 

I 



■ !. 5> 3 

11 I 






148 West Virginia University Catai/jgue 

GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING AND OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION. 

This option is planned to meet the needs of the engineer who is 
more interested in the geological aspect of mining than in the actual 
operation of a mining property. There is a growing demand for the 
so-called mining geologist who, while he has a thorough training in 
the fundamentals of engineering in general and of mining engineering 
in particular, yet is specially qualified to work out the detailed geo- 
logical features of mining properties and to make reports on them. 
This is peculiarly true in the case of oil and gas companies, where 
accurate geological knowledge in advance of actual drilling operations 
is of the greatest importance in the economical development of the 
field. Beside the opportunities offered by mining companies many of 
our railroads maintain corps of geologists, while the several states and 
the federal government are continually carrying on geological investi- 
gations. This course also offers an excellent preparation for those 
who propose to carry on graduate work. Sufficient latitude in the se- 
lection of electives will be permitted to allow the course to conform 
to the needs of the individual student. 

In the junior year the course differs from the coal mining option 
in that advanced quantitative analysis, organic chemistry, and labora- 
tory courses in petrology and stratigraphy are substituted for the 
courses in coal mining. The fundamentals of mining are studied in 
the senior year, as well as power plant design, applied electricity and 
structural engineering A course in field geology in which the student 
prepares a geological map and a complete report on an assigned area 
enables him to apply the geological knowledge he received in his 
junior year. The study of oil and gas geology treats of the origin, 
properties, distribution and mode of accumulation of oil and gas, while 
the course in oil and gas literature familiarizes the student with all 
the available sources of information on this subject. The course in 
oil and gas production and oil and gas laboratory take up the subjects 
of the chemical and physical properties of petroleum and natural gas, 
their extraction and subsequent treatment, the valuation of oil and gas 
properties, reports on them, and the actual testing in the laboratory 
of various oils, oil shales, and natural gas. 



THE l lOLLEGJ [NEERING 






UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN MINING ENGINEERING 
(OIL AND GAS OPTION. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of 

Mines. 



First Year — First Semester. 
Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 1) 3 
Advanced algebra (Math. 3) 3 

Plane trigonometry (Math I 
Inorganic chemistry(Ohem. 1 i t 

•.nical drawini 
Military BCJence (1) 1 

Shop work ( .< IV 

Second Year — First Semester. 

rentlal calculua(Math. 7) :: 
General phyafc 

Descriptive geomet] 3 

Advanced BUT f ej ing 102 
Military BCience I 1 

Qual. analysis (ChenL 4) 2 

Mechanical drawing 25 



First Year — Second Semest**- 
Rhetoric and cum; 
Anal.. 

Trigonon* 

Land su: 100 3 

Military - 1 

mica] drawii 

Second Year — Second Semester. 



•j v 



ral calculus 

Genera] pi i. 8. 9) 

Statics 70 

Mine survey in 

Military - (4) 

Quan. analysis (Chem. 6) 

Pipe Fittir 



3 
5 

3 

1 
1 19 



Summer work. Surveying 109—1 
and Mine surveying 90 2 



Third Year — First Semester. 



Third Year — Second Semester. 



Mechanical Laboratory 130 2 

Mechanics of Materials 71 4 

Thermodynamics 121 3 

Elementary mineralogy 89 2 

General Geology (Geol. 2) 3 

Petrology laboratory (Geol. 15) 1 

Organic chemistry (Chem. 16) 3 
Engineering Society 162 



Kinetics 72 
Hydraulics 73 
Mechanical lab. 
Metallur- 
gical geol boL 3) 4 
Ugraphy lab. (GeoL 16) l 
Quan. analysis (Chem. 7) 
19 Lnnineerins: S 162 1 1^ 



Summer work (Out of residence) Summer Practice 1*4 I 
Fourth Year — First Semester. Fourth Year — Second Semester. 



Power plant deaign 123 
Structural Ensjineerine 14 t 
Coal Mining M 
Mine ventilation 88 

Applied electricity "1 
Field geolosy (Geol. 17 1 
Oil and gas geol. 
Thesis 99 
Engineering Society 163 



1 n 1 



IS 



I :Sh 

93 

llurgical lab. 96 
Oil and - 
Oil and gas lab. 97 
Ecoo >1. 4) 

s 99 

Bnglneei 

*Elec- 



1 






'Elective! : 

Economic Geology (Geol '<> 

Paleontoloi 

Industrial Chem. (( 
Concrete Construction 117 
Non-ferrous metallurgy 



*50 AY est Viboinia University Catalogue 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 

The object of the four-year course in chemical engineering is to 
qualify young men to design, build, and manage manufacturing plants 
in which the products of manufacture are based on chemical pro- 
cesses and to fit men for professional employment as industrial 
chemists and chemical engineers. 

The curriculum outlined on the following page is designed to 
give the student a thorough knowledge of the fundamental principles 
of chemistry, a theoretical and practical training in mechanical engin- 
eering subjects including electrical engineering, and a thorough train- 
ing in industrial chemistry and the more common engineering and 
industrial processes based on chemical reactions. 

The course includes theoretical and analytical work in inorganic, 
organic and industrial chemistry, mathematics, physics, theoretical 
and applied mechanics, mechanical drawing, shop practice, structural 
engineering and industrial management, heat engineering, power plant 
design, electrical engineering, mechanical and electrical laboratory, 
sanitary engineering, mineralogy and metallurgy. The subjects in- 
cluded in the curriculum are those offered at the present time, but 
additional subjects in purely chemical engineering will be added later. 

Students preparing to take the course in chemical engineering 
should present German for entrance. In order to provide time for a 
broader training in language, economics, history and science, and 
for additional courses in applied chemistry and engineering, students 
are recommended to take the combination Bachelor of Science and 
Engineering course. By a careful selection of electives both degrees 
may be secured in five years. 



The Collb I \«.i.m.i.i.: 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical 
Engineering. 



First Year — First Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (Ens. 1> :'. 

Advanced algebra (Math. 3) 3 

Plane trigonometry (Math. 4) 2 

inorganic chemistry (Chem. 1) 4 

Military science (1) 1 

Mechanical drawing 20 2 

Woodworking 1 1 

Forcing 7 1 



First Year — Second Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (Eni:. | 

Anal >metry (Math 

Trigonom- (Math. 6) 2 

S ur v e y in g 101 l 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem. 2) \ 

Military science (2) 1 

Mechanical drawir 2 

Foundrv S 2 



IS 



Summer work. Machine shop 13 — 3 



Second Year — First Semester. 

Differential calculus(Math. 7) 3 
General physics (Phys. 6, 7) 5 
Descriptive geometry 26 3 

Military science (3) 1 

Qual. anal (Chem. 5) 4 

Mechanical drawing 24 2 IS 



Second Year — Second Semester. 



Integral calculus (Math. 8) 
General physics (Phys. 8. 9) 
Static- 

Mechanism 27 
Military science (4) 
Mechanism drawiru 
Quant. analysis (Chem 



I 

5 
3 

2 

1 
2 

6) I It 



Summer work. Summer practice 164 — 2 



Third Year — First Semester. 

Mechanics of materials 71 4 

Thermodynamics 121 3 

Elect, and mac. (Phys 10) 3 

Mechanical laboratory 130 2 

Organic chemistry (Chem 16) 3 

Quant, analysis (Chem. 7) :' 
Engineering Society 162 



Third Year — Second Semester. 

Kinetics 72 3 
Hydraulic i 

Quant, analysis (Chem. 8) 5 

Machine design 35 3 

Mechanical laboratory 131 2 
Machine drawing 36 



18 Engineering Society 162 



1 18 



Fourth Year — First Semester. 

Power plant design 123 I 
Sanitary engineering 14^ 
or Geology 2 

Electrical eneineering 53 I 

Industrial management 46 1 

Special chemistry (Chem. 15) 2 

Structural engineering 144 2 

Mineralogy (Geol. 6) 2 

Electrical laborator 2 

Thesis 1 
Engineering Society 163 If 



Fourth Year — Second Semester. 

Mineral". (Geol. 7) 2 

Elements of elect, enc'i; 54 I 

Enclish (Eng. 14) 1 

Electrical laboratory 6S 2 

Indust. chemistry (Chem. 19) 3 

Metallurgy 85 3 

Metallurgy 96 2 

Thesis 2 

Encineerinc Society 163 1 1* 



152 West Virginia University Catau)Gue 



COMBINED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING CURRICULUM. 

The following course of study is suggested for students who ex- 
pect to take an engineering degree after receiving the degree of 
Bachelor of Science, or who wish to take a general course with en- 
gineering subjects as a major: 

English composition (English 1 and 2) 6 hrs. 

English literature (English 26 and 27) 4 " 

Algebra and trigonometry 7 " 

Analytical geometry and calculus 9 " 

Physics 6, 7, 8, 9 10 " 

Mechanics 70, 71, 72 10 " 

Chemistry 1, 2 and 4 10 " 

Descriptive geometry 3 " 

Mechanical drawing 6 " 

One foreign language 20 " 

Botany, zoology, geology, or entomology, any 

one 8 " 

History, economics, or commerce, any one_8 " 

Military science (when required) 4 " 

Elective, preferably in science and engineer- 
ing, that count toward both the bachelor of 

arts and engineering degrees 23 " 

Total 128 " 

Students who expect to take a degree in civil engineering should 
include Geology 2 and 4, Land surveying 100, Mechanism 29, Mech- 
anica drawing 25 and 30, Hydraulics 73, Applied electricity 51 and 
Shop work 9. 

Applicants for a degree in mechanical or electrical engineering 
should include ten hours in shop work. Mechanical drawing 24 
and 28, Mechanism 27, Surveying 100. and Physics 10. 

Applicants for a degree in mining engineering should include 
Geology 2 and 4, Chemistry 6. Land surveying 100, Physics 10, Min- 
eralogy 98, Shop work 9 and Mechanical drawing 24. 

Students who wish to prepare for teaching science, engineering 
or industrial subjects, may with the approval of the Committee on 
Classification and Grades substitute eight hours in education for an 
equivalent amount of required work in the science and history groups. 

By following the above curriculum students may receive both the 
B.S. degree and the engineering degree in five years. 



Thk COLLEGE OF ENCONBBD 

UNDERGADUATE CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 

The object of this coarse \b to prepare young men and \\< 

to teach vocational subjects an 1 to BOperYlse vocational work in 
nection with the administration of the Smith-Hughes Act T: 

new course and the exact requirements have not been definite!] I 

A total of one hundred and twenty-eight semester hours \sill !)• 
quired for graduation which must include ten hours in English, ten 
hours in mathematics, a thorough knowledge of one or more tn. 
four hours in mechanical drawing and ten hours of vocational indus- 
trial education. 

For further information address the Dean of the College of Kn- 
pineerinc. 



154 West Virginia University Catalogue 

SPECIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULA. 

1. Elective Groups for Students in Other Colleges. Candidates 
for degrees other than engineering degrees, and special students in 
any department of the University, are permitted to elect subjects in 
the College of Engineering, provided, in each case, they have had the 
subjects specified as prerequisites. Students who wish to take a 
general classical or scientific course of study before taking the en- 
gineering curriculum are advised to carry their mathematics as far 
as called for by the engineering curriculum, and to take some of their 
elective work in the College of Engineering. The engineering instruc- 
tors will advise them What is best to elect. 

Credits are given in the College of Arts and Sciences for the 
following engineering courses: 

Subject Credit Hours 

Mechanical drawing 20-25, 28 or 30 8 

Descriptive geometry 26 3 

Industrial management 46, 47 4 

Direct Current Theory 50 3 

Applied electricity 51 3 

Elements of electrical engineering 53, 54 4 

Direct current machinery 52 4 

Theory of alternating currents 55 3 

Alternating current machinery 56 3 

Electrical laboratory 60, 61, 62, 63 4 

Applied electricity in home and office 66 2 

Statics 70 3 

Mechanics of materials 71 4 

Hydraulics 73 1 2 

Dynamics 72 3 

Metallurgy 85, 96 3 

Land surveying 100 and 101 3 

Thermodynamics 121 3 

Heating and ventilating 127 3 

Heat engines 122 3 

In addition to the above the student may elect with the consent 
cf his class officer, when his major subject is physics or education: 

Engineering 1-18 (Mechanic arts) 10 

Mechanical drawing 20-25, 28 or 30 3 

2. Partial Curriculum. Students who have not the time or are 
otherwise unable to take a full curriculum, will be allowed to take a 
special or partial curriculum, consisting of such studies as they are 
prepared to take, provided that such curriculum shall have been ap- 
proved by the class officer. For further information see statement 
of requirements for admission as special students. 



Tm. COLLBOl 01 ENOINl EBI] 

3. Manual Training Courses. The !ii>» STOOD I 

l and 7 in mechanical engineering. The second stood (, f 

mechanical drawing, courses 10, tl, 12; end ehop practice in ■ 
and metal working, eonrsei 1, 10, 11 and 14. These com 

aim to present the simple elements of some of the oonatmetiTe 

Which admit of being developed into a logical Series Of 

Their merit is chiefly educational. The primary object Ifl the training 

of the eye to see the form of objects and of the hand to produce such 

forms in the materials most commonly need in constructive work. 

There is sufficient Instruction in handicraft work and practice to form 

a proper foundation for the more advanced work with machine ' 

used In mechanical construction, and these con 

quired of all students taking the full course in mechanical engineei 

4. Special Courses for Mechanics, etc. Students who wish to 
become more proficient in the use of tools or who are preparing them- 
selves for positions as foreman in industrial establishments, may take 
additional work in the shop in which they wish to specialize. Instruc- 
tion will be given in the maintenance and repair of machinery, and 
opportunity will be afforded for the construction of new machines 
and apparatus for the University, as well as for the working up in 
the shops of original designs which have been approved by the head 
of the department. All students in mechanical engineering are recom- 
mended to take advantage of this provision and devote as much tim» 
as possible to shop and drawing-room practice. 



156 \Vi:st Virginia University Catalogue 

SUMMER TERM. 

A summer term lasting six weeks is given immediately after the 
close of each collegiate year. The following regular engineering 
courses will be offered at that time: Woodworking 1, 2, 3; Forging 7; 
Machine tool work 13 and 14; Machine construction 15; Mechanical 
drawing 20, 22, and Surveying 109; Railroad surveying 110 and Mine 
surveying 90. 

Surveying 109 is given during the first week (eight hours per 
day for six working days) and Railroad surveying continues for two 
weeks. Mine surveying 90 will follow Surveying 109 for two full 
weeks. Machine shop 13 may be completed by full time work cov- 
ering the first three weeks or may be distributed over the full term 
of six weeks. Hours 8:00 to 12:00, 1:00 to 5:00 every week day except 
Saturday afternoon. Special hours for students taking less than full 
work will be arranged. 

Students in mechanical and electrical engineering should take 
Machine tool work 13, three hours in the Summer Term following 
the freshman year. 

This work, with that taken during the preceding freshman and 
the following sophomore collegiate years will enable students to fill 
positions in shops, factories, etc., during the two other vacations with 
better financial advantage and with far better results in the way of 
practical engineering experience than if the summer work is post- 
poned until the second vacation. Students not taking the summer 
shop work in the first summer term will take Machine tool work 13 
(1 hr.) during the sopohomore year and will then take the remaining 
four hours of Machine tool work 13 and 14, during the second sum- 
mer term. 

Students in civil and mining engineering should take the residence 
courses in surveying at the time scheduled, but Summer Practice 164 
may be taken out of residence during any vacation period. 

Students who are regular in their work are urged to spend all 
their vacation periods in practical work, but students who are irreg- 
ular or have conditions should so far as possible take advantage of 
the summer school to make up their deficiencies. 

In cases where students have exceptional opportunities in the 
way of practical summer work in commercial machine shops and 
engineering corps, along the line covered by the University courses, 
credit will be given for such work, the amount to be determined after 
an examination of each individual case. 



Tm. ( College o» Engineer] 

CURRICULA FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS IN 
ENGINEERING. 

Graduate courses lead to the 

Science in civil Engineering, Ifaater i e In Mechanical 

gineering. Ifaater of Sclent •«■ in Electrical Bnf and M. 

of Science in Engineering of Mtnei vely. Tl ad- 

vanced engineering courses aggregating twenty-ton: 

and a thesis, and require one year of n Itudy and work at 

University. 

a candidate for a professional degree is required to have com- 
pleted the prescribed four-year curriculum of undergraduate study in 
that department of the college in which he propose! to take a de^ 
or to have completed such a curriculum or its equivalent at some 
other institution of recognized standing, conferring the same or an 
equivalent baccalaureate degree. In the la the diploma and 

Other certificates of proficiency should be presented. 

Thre is no fixed curriculum of subjects tor any of these defi 
but the curriculum of study or investigation is arranged to suit the 
needs of each candidate, subject to the University regulations go\- 
erning candidates for the maater*f i on pai 

Each candidate for a degree must select his major subject in the de- 
partment in which his degree is to be taken and submit a thesis 
showing attainment in some phase of this subject. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES FOR WORK IN ABSENTIA. 

The University confers the following professional degrees: Civil 
Engineer (C.E.), Mechanical Engineer (M.E.), Electrical Engineer 
(E.E.), and Engineer of Mines (E.M.). upon graduates of the College 
of Engineering of the West Virginia University on the basis of prac- 
tical experience and study in absentia, the presentation of a tl • 
and an oral final examination. 

To be eligible a candidate for a professional degree must have 
been in active practice of his profession for at hast five year> since 
receiving his first degree and must have been in responsible Chi 
of important work for at least two rears, and must be qualified to 
design as well as direct engineering work. 

Application for registration as a candidate for <■. hould be 

made not later than the first day of October in the year in which the 
degree is expected. Detailed regulations and registration blanks may 
be obtained from the Pean of the College of Engineering. 



158 West Virginia University Catalogue 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

In the following announcements, the name of the course is fol- 
lowed by its credit value in semester hours. A credit of one semester 
hour is given for a lecture or recitation course meeting one hour per 
week for one semester and requiring two hours of preparation for 
each lecture or recitation. 

Credit for practical work in the shops, drawing rooms, labora- 
tories and field, is given on the basis of the actual time required, 
including the preparation of reports and the writing of notes, three 
hours actual work counting as one recitation hour. 

DRAWING, MACHINE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. 

Professor Hayes, Assistant Professor Hart, Assistant Professor Grow, 
Mr. West, Mr. Seaman and Mr. Limprecht. 

1. Woodworking. (1 Hr.) For freshmen. Required of all candi- 
dates for engineering degrees. Instruction in carpentry; exercises 
with the fundamental edge tools in soft and hard woods and in mak- 
ing typical framed work; wood turning; face plate work; boring, 
finishing, and polishing. 

First semester; section one, M. E. students, first half, T. Th., 2:00; 
section two, E. E. students, second half, T. Th., 2:00; conference T., 
11:00; Mr. Seaman, 203 M. H. (Also given in Summer Term.) 

2. Woodworking. (1 Hr.) Optional for candidates for degrees 
in the College of Agriculture. Includes instruction in carpentry; 
exercises with fundamental edge tools in soft and hard woods, with 
especial attention to the making of typical framed structures. 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00-10:00; Mr. Seaman, 203 M. H. (Also 
given in Summer Term.) 

3. Woodworking. Advanced work for special students, who are 
allowed to specialize along the lines of their choice. The amount of 
credits to be given depends upon the time spent in the shop and the 
progress of the student. Prerequisite: Woodworking 1 and 2. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Mr. Seaman. 203 M. H. 
(Also given in Summer Term.) 

4. Pattern Making. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for 
degrees in electrical and mechanical engineering. The production of 
patterns for castings for machine construction and other work to be 
executed later in machine shop. Prerequisite: Woodworking 1, and 
Foundry 5. 

First semester; section one. M. E. students, W.. 2:00 and S., 8:00; 
section two, E. E. students, M. F., 2:00; Mr. Seaman. 203 M H. 



The Col E 






5. Foundry Work. (2 Hi*.) Required of all candidal.- 

in electrical and mechanical engineering. Molding, facing and p 
ing sands; typical tools and appliances; cupola praer 

cored work, bi ting. Elementary pattern m a king , 

Second seme- tldl one, M T two, W. Th I 

section ?>. P., 2:00, B., S:- T. 11:00; Mr Beamah 

•anr. 1 II. EL 

6. Foundry Work. Advanced work for special rtodenl nua- 
tion of Foundry .". 

Semester and hours to be arranged; Mr Ska man. 1 M. H 

7. Forging. (1 Hr.) Required of all candidates for «!■ 
electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Fir- ter, section on*-. at V. Itodenta, second half-seme 

T. Th.. I ion two. E. E. students, first half-semester, T Th.. 

2:00; conference. T., 11:00; Mr. WnST, - at H. 

Second semester; for agricultural students v. _ B 1:00; Ml 

I at H. 

8. Forging. Advanced work for special students. Continuation 
of Forging 7 

Hours to be arranged; Mr. Wfst. 1 at H. 

9. Shop Work. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for de^ 

in civil engineering and engineering of mines. Instruction in wood- 
work, forging, and machine shop practice. 

First semester; M. F.. 2:00; conference. 11:00; Assistant Profeaaor 
Hart. 101 M. H.. Mr. Wbot, 1 M H . Mr. S: ft 

Students will be assigned to sections for distribution amonc the 
three shops. 

10. Pipe Fitting. (1 Hr.) Required of all candidates for degrees 
in electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Second semester; section one. second half. M. Th., 2:00; section 
two. first half. M. Th.. I •■< tion three, second half. T. F.. 2:00; con- 

ference, w. 12:00; Mr Wbot, 4 at H. 

13. Machine Tool Work. (3 Hrs.) Required of all candid 

for degrees in electrical and mechanical engineering. Hand work 
element? of machine work. Lectures and shop work. 

Summer Term. 8:00 to 12:00. 1:00 to 5:0' a nt Profeaeor 

Hart. 1"1 at ft (This course is also given during the collegiate year; 
hours to be arranged). 

14. Machine Tool Work. (1 Hr.) Required of all candidates for 
degrees in electrical and mechanical engineering. Continuation of 



160 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Machine tool work 13, which is a prerequisite. Advanced work on 
planer, milling machine, and grinder. Lectures and shop work. 

Second semester; section one, first half, M. Th., 2:00; section two, 
second half, M. Th., 2:00; section three, first half, T. F., 2:00; confer- 
ence, W., 12:00; Assistant Professor Hart, 101 M. H. 

15. Machine Construction. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates 
for degrees in electrical and mechanical engineering. Continuation of 
Machine tool work 14 with special attention to assembling, fitting 
and erecting of machines. Study of principles of heat treatment. 
Lectures and shop work. 

First semester; section one, M., 2:00; S., 8:00; section two, T. F., 
2 : 00 ; Assistant Professor Hart, 101 M. H. 

16. Shop Methods. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for 
degrees in mechanical engineering. Continuation of Machine con- 
struction 15. Study of machine and other shop methods for limited 
and wholesale production, use of jigs and templates and of special 
machines and processes; work shop appliances in general; cost of 
machine work. Shop and laboratory work; lectures, inspection trips, 
reading, etc. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; Assistant Professor Hart, 104 M. H. 

17. Machine Construction. Advanced work for special students. 
Continuation of Machine construction 15 and Shop methods 16. 

Hours to be arranged ; Assistant Professor Hart, 104 M. H. 

18. Electrical Construction. (May be substituted by electrical 
engineering students for Machine Construction 15.) For special stu- 
dents or others wishing practical experience along electrical lines. 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Forman, and Associate Professor 
Hall, 24 M. H. 

*20. Mechanical Drawing. (2 Hrs.) For freshmen. Required of 
all candidates for enginering degrees. Care and use of drawing in- 
struments, line exercises, geometric construction, plain lettering, in- 
cluding proficiency in at least one style, orthographic projection, 
isometric projection. 

First semester; section one, W., 2:00, S., 8:00; section two, M. F., 
2:00; section three, T. Th., 2:00; Assistant Professor Grow and Mr. 
Limprecht, 212 M. H. 

*21. Mechanical Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for students in 
home economics. Use of drawing instruments, practice in reading of 
drawings, designing and drawing of furniture and of room and house 
plans. 

First semester; T. Th., 2:00; Professor Hayes, 207 M. H. 



Ti BW 

♦22. Mechanical Drawing. (2 Hrs.) For Freshmen !:• ■;..:• 
all candidates for • -i\~m* • trinf Continuation of lf< 

drawing 2 Dd work.: rom 

models, parts of machines and from proportions obtained (rom 

pirical forum". 

Second • and four, T 

W . 8:00, S., 8:00; section three. M. Th.. - 

.Mr. Lucres* bt, 212 m. h. - one. two and three, M. B. end B 

students: section four. C. E. and k. if. students. 

•23. Mechanical Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Kh-ctive for Sta 
culture. I'se of drawing instruments, practice in reading of draw- 
ings, building plans, designing and drawing of framed structures and 
Their details. 

»nd semester: M at Professor Grow and 

Mr. LivriiK in. 212 M. ft 

*24. Empirical Design. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for 
degrees in electrical and mechanical engineering. Continuation of 

hanical drawing 22. Detail and assembly drawings from propor- 
tions obtained from empirical formulas. Also a study of the purpose, 
characteristics, and stock sizes of various standardized machine parts. 

First semester; section one. If. E. students, M. F., 2:00; section 
two. E. E. students, W ristant Professor Gbow and 

Mr. Limi'BECht, 212 M. H. 

*25. Mechanical Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candi*: 
for degrees in civil engineering and engineering of mines. Continua- 
tion of Mechanical drawing 22. Drawing room conventions for repre- 
sentation of materials, details of topography, wooden framing, struc- 
tural steel shapes and framing, etc.. lettering of titles, map tracing. 

First semester; W, F. 8:00; Assistant Professor Grow and Mr 
Limprkcht, 212 M. H. 

•26. Descriptive Geometry. (3 Hrs.) Required of all candidates 
for engineering degrees. Orthographic projection in the four quad- 
rants; problems of the point; line and plane; tangencies; intersection 
of plane and curved surfaces; developments of single curved surfaces. 
Prerequisite: Mechanical drawing 20. 

First semester: T. Th F 
Professor d 308 M. Id. 

27. Mechanism and Machinery. (2 Hrs ) R* quired of all candi- 
dates for degrees in electrical and mechanical engineering. To ac- 
company Mechanism drawing :> analysil and classification of 
mechanisms: diagrams of relative velocities 



162 West Virginia University Catalogue 

mission and change of motions. Lectures and recitations. Prere- 
quisite: Mechanical drawing 22. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; or T. Th., 8:00; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Grow and Mr. LlMPBECHT, 208 M. H. 

*28. Mechanism Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates 
for degrees in electrical and mechanical engineering. To accompany 
Mechanism and machinery 27. Drawing and diagrams of mechanical 
movements, velocity diagrams, graphical solution of problems, design 
and drawing of gear teeth. Prerequisite: Mechanical drawing 22. 

Second semester; sections one and two, T. F., 2:00; section three, 
M. W., 2:00; Assistant Professor Grow and Mr. Limprectit, 212 M. H. 

29. Mechanism and Machinery. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candi- 
dates for degrees in civil engineering. To accompany Mechanism 
drawing 30. Brief course in analysis and classification of mechan- 
isms; diagrams of motion and velocity, cams, gearing, belting, 
clutches, etc.. followed by a study and analysis of mechanisms and 
machines used in the various branches of civil engineering construc- 
tion; hoists. 

Second semester; M., 10:00; W., 12:00; Assistant Professor Grow, 
208 M. H. 

*30. Mechanism Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates 
for degrees in civil engineering. To accompany Mechanism and ma- 
chinery 29. Drawings and diagrams of mechanical movements, veloc- 
ity diagrams, gear teeth. Prerequisite: Mechanical drawing 22. 

Second semester; Th., 2:00; S., 8:00; Assistant Professor Grow and 
Mr. Limprecht, 212 M. H. 

31. Valve Gears. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for degrees 
in mechanical engineering. To accompany Machine drawing 32. Lec- 
tures and recitations. Prerequisites: Mechanism and machinery 27 
and 28. 

First semester; M. F., 10:00; Professor Hayes, 209 M. H. 

32. Machine Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for 
degrees in mechanical engineering. To accompany Valve gears 31. 
Valve diagram problems; designing and drawing of valves and gears 
for steam and gas engines; design of governor mechanism. 

First semester; T. Th., 2:00; Professor Hayes, and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Grow, 207 M. H. 

33. Valve Gears. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for degrees 
in electrical engineering. To accompany Machine drawing 34. Lec- 
tures and recitations. Prerequisites: Mechanism and machinery 27 
and 28. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; Professor Hayes, 208 M. H. 



Tin. Colli ' E igini bri 

34. Machine Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Required! Of all - 

degrees In eta trical engineering. pejiy Vai. 

Valve diagram problems for Bteam an< 
ernor mechanism; assembly drawing of dynamo, 
ter; M. F 
Gaow, 807 M. H. 

35. Machine Design. (8 Hrs.) Required ol all candid 
degrees In electrical and mechanical engineering To so 
Machine drawing 36. Element* of machim 

rational proportionin lechanics of machinery; Inflm 

of material and treatment on design. Pn 71 

and Mechanism and machinery 27 and 

M t 1" ' ' M. H 

36. Machine Drawing. (2 Hrs.) K« ■•; Sll CSlldl 

trical and mechanical ring. To accon | 

Machine : ii n lt and drawing of machine elements and 

finally of complete machine. 

•ion ono. m B. Btndents, M. W 
two. ]■:. i •-. T. v , 2:00; H mra snd 

•■ Grow, Wl M. H. 

37. Advanced Machine Design. (2 Hrs.) Optional for I 
Dior students in mechanical • -.tinuatior. 

Machim Igning and Drawing 38. Gr 

leal solutions of problems in machine forces: theory of elasti< 
dym machines, governors, reciprocating parts, fly-wheels, run- 

nine: balance, whirling of shafts, etc. Lectures and recitations. 
'■ F .11 If. H 

38. Designing and Drawing. (\ first optional for fourth 

students in mechanical engineering. 1 unpany Advanced 

chine design 37. 

Fir~ M. T. th. F ftfl H. 

39. Steam Engine Design. (2 Hrs) optional for fourth 

students in mechanical engineering. To accompany Designing and 

drawing 40. Detailed study of modern steam engine; comp 
rational ami empirical formulae. Dynamics of machim 
reciprocating parts and fly-v. Lec tur es and recitations. 

requisite.-: Machine design 36, Valve gears "i and Machine <]■ 
inp 

First m meeter; M P., 11 :< If. H 



164 West Virginia University Catalogue 

40. Designing and Drawing. (4 Hrs.) Optional for fourth year 
students in mechanical engineering. To accompany Steam engine de- 
sign 39. 

First semester; M. T. Th. F., 2:00; Professor Hayes, 207 M. H. 

41. Designing and Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates 
for degrees in electrical and mechanical engineering. Continuation 
in the drawing room of Power plant design 123. Making of the work- 
ing drawings showing the location of boilers, engines, auxiliaries, 
piping, coal and ash handling machinery, etc. 

Second semester; T. F., 2:00; Professor Hayes, 207 M. H. 

44. Metallography. (3 Hrs.) Optional for senior students. Ele- 
ments of metallography of iron-carbon and other ferrous alloys. Study 
of equilibrium diagram and transformation points with applications to 
heat treatment of steels used in engineering. Lectures, recitation 
and laboratory work. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Hayes, 209 
M. H. 

45. Gas Engine Design. (3 Hrs.) Optional for fourth year stu- 
dents in mechanical engineering. Prerequisite: Machine design 35. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Hayes, 207 
and 208 M. H. 

*46. Industrial Management. (1 Hr.) Required of all students in 
electrical and mechanical engineering. Elementary study of organi- 
zation of industrial establishments, management, systems of payment, 
cost keeping, distribution of overhead expenses, determination of 
cost of production, etc. 

First semester; M., 9:00; Professor Hayes, 209 M. H. 

*47. Industrial Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Optional for fourth- year 
students in mechanical engineering. Continuation of Industrial man- 
agement 46, which is a prerequisite. Study of establishment, equip- 
ment and operation of the various types of industrial plants. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Hayes, 209 M. H. 

49. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) Optional thesis requirement for the degree 
of B.S.M.E. The working out of some special problems in design or 
construction or both. See general thesis requirements, page 143. 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Hayes, 209 M. H. 



THE ( 'OLLEGE I H I-1m.imi.kini, 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 
Professor Fokm an and Assistant Professor H \i i 

•50. Direct Current Theory. (I Mrs.) Primarily for third 

students. Required for the d< i;si:i: dementi 

current and accompanying phenomenon encountered in direct cur- 
rent generators and motors, end allied apparatus. Prereq . 

Physics 8. 

First semester; T. P., 10:00, \v. 8:00; ProfeseoT Posmah, 124 II H 

♦51. Applied Electricity. (3 His .) Primarily for the third 

students in civil engineering. Required tor the degree of BJ3.< 

Lectures and recitations accompanying' laboratory Prere- 

quisite: Physics 8. 

First semester; T. Th.. 11:00; Associate Professor Hall, in M 
H.; laboratory, M. or T., 2:00; associate Professor Hall, U m. h 

*52. Direct Current Machinery. (1 Hrs.) Continuation of I ' 
current theory 50. Required for the degree of B.S.Ki: 

Second semester: M., 11:00; T. Th., 9:00; Associate Prof. 
Hall, 114 M. H.; laboratory, Th.. 2:00J Associate Professor Hali 
If. H. 

*53. Elements of Electrical Engineering. (2 Hrs.) A course for 
fourth year students in mechanical and mining engineering. Required 
for the R.S.M.K. and B.S.E.M degrees. A general study of the gen- 
eration, transmission, and the utilization of electrical energy. I 
requisites: Physics 10 and Calculus. 

First semester; W. P., B:00; Professor Pobmah, 124 M. H. 

*54. Elements of Electrical Engineering. (2 Hrs.) Continuation 
of Course 53. The industrial applications of electricity, with a con- 
sideration of the economic employment of systems of distribution and 
types of machines. 

Second semest-r; M. F.. 10:00; Professor Fosmak, 124 M H. 

♦55. Theory of Alternating Currents. (3 Hrs) < >p.>n to fourth 
year and graduate students. Required for th. of Bi3 I 

An analytical and graphical study of alternating current quantitJ 
Accompanied by Electrical engineering laboratory 80. I rite: 

Engineering 52. 

Wrsi r; M. w. v., 11:00; Pi fttucAw, 124 K. H. 

*56. Alternating Current Machinery. (3 His.) Continu 
Engineering 55. Theory and char machinec 



166 West Virginia University Catalogue 

quired for the degree of B.S.E.E. Accompanied by Electrical engineer- 
ing laboratory 61. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Fobman, 124 M. H. 

57. Electric Traction. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for fourth year stu- 
dents. Required for the degree B.S.E.E. A study of the equipment 
electric railway installations with special treatment of transmission 
and signal systems for traction. Prerequisite: Engineering 55. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Associate Professor Hall, 114 
M. H. 

58. Electrical Lighting and Power. (3 Hrs.) Open to fourth year 
and graduate students. Required for the degree of B.S.E.E. Prere- 
quisite: Engineering 50 

First semester; M. F.. 10:00; W., 9:00; Associate Professor Hall, 
114 M. H. 

59. Electrical Design and Drawing. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for fourth 
year students. Required for the degree of B.S.E.E. This course re- 
quires six hours a week in the designing room. Prerequisite: En- 
gineering 35 and 52. 

First semester; M. W., 2:00; F., 9:00; Associate Professor Hall, 
207 M. H. 

*60. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Open to fourth 
year and graduate students. Required for the degree of B.S.E.E. Pre- 
requisite: Engineering 52. 

First semester; T., 8:00; Professor Fobman, 24 M. H. 

•61. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of 
course 60. 

Second semester; T., 8:00; Professor Fobman, 24 M. H 

*62. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for 
fourth year students in mechanical and mining engineering. Required 
for the degrees of B.S.M.E. and B.S.E.M. To accompany Engineering 
53. Prerequisite: Physics 10. 

First semester; W., 2:00; Professor Fobman, 24 M. H. 

*63. Electrical Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of 
course 62. To accompany Engineering 54. 

Second semester; W., 2:00; Professor Fobmax, 24 M. H. 

64. Electrical Research. For graduate students only. Labora- 
tory investigations in special lines of electrical studies. 

Hours and credits to be arranged; Professor Fobman, 124 M. H. 



. 






65. Electrical Engineering - tar work 

Special I '\idy and 

Hours and I r be arranged; H 

♦66. Applied Electricity in Home and Office 

for students taki: .. e not re quirin g 

inu of common • 

electrica: I ived in in Un 

of electricity. 

T. Th., 11 t Hall, 114 

M. H. 

69. Thesis. (I I for the degree of 

M cial investigation of original 
relating to electrical engineering. 

Fin hours to be arranged; Prof-. 

n. M. H. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

For courses in these subjects see announcenu : 
• ring, page , and Oil and Ga- 

HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING. 
.79. 



168 West Virginia University Catalogue 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 
Associate Professor Leland. 

200. Methods of Teaching Operatives in Industrial Plants. (2 
Hrs.) This course is designed for those who are engaged, or are 
planning to become engaged as foremen, assistant foremen, or instruc- 
tors in industrial plants. It includes discussions of the mechanics of 
teaching; the arranging of the elements of trade knowledge in an 
effective teaching order; and teaching as contrasted with showing 
and telling. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor 

I .ELAND, 1 S. 

201. Methods of Teaching in Day and Evening Industrial Courses, 
Continuation, and Part-Time Courses. (3 Hrs.) The object of this 
course will be to give to men and women who are planning to teach 
in these courses, a knowledge of methods appropriate to the aim of 
the course, and the characteristics of the pupils. A description will 
be given, with methods of teaching, of certain subjects which may be 
properly taught in trade and industrial courses, which have nothing 
to do with the operation of machines, but furnish the mechanic with 
valuable trade knowledge. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor 
Leland. 1 S. 

202. The Administration of Vocational Education. (3 Hrs.) This 
course is primarily for persons who expect to become engaged in the 
administration of vocational education. Among the topics to be dis- 
cussed will be the Smith-Hughes Law; the scope of the vocational 
education movement; a detailed study of the problem of industrial 
education; the administration of industrial education; and the problem 
of training vocational teachers. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor 
Leland. 1 S. 

203. Methods of Teaching Operatives in Industrial Plants. (2 Hrs.) 
The purpose of this course is to give shop foremen and other shop 
men who are required to instruct operatives, an acquaintance with 
the teaching process, the selection of material, and the methods of 
instruction. 

Considerable time will be devoted to job and trade analysis, and 
the classification of trade knowledge. 

Each member of the course will be expected to work out a set of 
lesson plans for the teaching of trade, or for the teaching of a series 
of productive operations. 

Second semester; an evening course; Associate Professor Leland, 
1 S. 



TllK I JOLLEGE OP ENGIN1 






MECHANICS AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 

Bmobt. 

70. statics. (I Hrs.) Required of all lecood 

students. A study of tb€ OOmposit ion ami ftolUJ an 

alytical and graphical methods; moments, Couples, equilibrium, 
ter of gravity and moment of Inertia §1 Sled 

structures. Prerequisite: Integra] calculus. 

Second semester; T. Th. F. 10:09; Professor E 81 M H. 

•71. Mechanics of Materials. (\ Hrs.) Required of all third 

engineering Students. Continuation of cou: ' of 

materials, resistance and elasticity of pipes, cylinders and riveted 
joints, cantilever and simple bean: gtfc of Umbers, Iron - 

stone, concrete; elastic limits, factor of safety; design of si: 

structure. Prerequisite - I 

Fir- ter; T. W. Th. F. S :<><>: Professor E -1 M H. 

♦72. Kinetics. (3 His.) Required of all third year engineering 
students. Continuation of Statics 70. Laws of motion in : 
medium, central forces, centrifugal force; pendulum and governor, 
imp ; -. power modulus of machines, revolving ma- 

work of variable forces, duty of engines, impressed forces, motion 
fly-wheel, conserrstion of • Prerequisl 

Second semester; T. Th. F.. B:00; Professor E '- M. H. 

*73. Hydraulics. (2 Hrs.) Required of all engineering stu<i- 
Theoretical pressure and energy of water; flew of water through ori- 

B and tubes and over weirs; flow in conduit, pipes, canals, and 
rivers; cuiTent meters, water motor turbines. Prerequisite: Kin- 
72. 

Second semester; If. W. B:00; Professor Dams, til M. H 

75. Least Squares and Adjustment of Observations. (1 
Elective for fourth year and graduate engineering stud- 

of observation; principles of probability, least squSJ 

rors of observation, errors in the mean, corre( 

normal equations, empirical formulae. Prerequisite: Caleu 

First semester: hours to be arranged; Prof- . M H 

76. Mechanics. (6 Hrs.) Includ- and first half of 
silica or' materials 17. \ 

Pin .1 M H. 

77. Mechanics. lation of c<> Includes 
last half of Mechanics of materials 71 and Kineti. 

Sec 221 M. H 



170 West Virginia University Cataix)gue 

MINING ENGINEERING. 
Associate Professor Callen. 

80. Mine Surveying. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for sophomores. Re- 
quired of all candidates for degrees in mining engineering. With this 
subject is included topographic surveying, location of outcrop, shaft 
plumbing, railroad curves, and the various systems of mine surveying 
and note keeping. The accuracy of the field work is tested by plot- 
ting the notes. Prerequisite: Advanced surveying 102. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00; S., 8:00; Associate Professor 
Callen and Mr. Blair, 119 M. H. 

81. Coal Mining. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for juniors. Required of 
all candidates for degrees in mining engineering. A study of the oc- 
currence and composition of coal; prospecting, breaking ground, trans- 
mission of power to underground workings, coal cutting, explosives, 
blasting, shaft sinking, timbering and the various methods of working 
coal seams at home and abroad. Prerequisite: Chemistry 4; 
Physics 8. 

First semester; M. 11:00; T. Th., 9:00; Associate Professor 
Callen, 119 M. H. 

82. Coal Mining. (4 Hrs.) A study of the various systems of 
haulage, hoisting and pumping; surface plants; the preparation of 
coal for the market. Prerequisite: Coal Mining 81. 

Second semester; M. T. Th. F., 9:00; Associate Professor 
Callen, 119 M. H. 

83. Mine Ventilation. (3 Hrs.) Mine air and mine gases; the ven- 
tilation of mines; mine lighting; a study of the causes and prevention 
of mine explosions; rescue and recovery work. Prerequisite: Coal 
Mining 81. 

First semester; M. F., 10:00, and a third hour to be arranged; 
Associate Professor Callen, 119 M. H. 

84. Mine Management. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors. Re- 
quired of all candidates for degrees in mining engineering. Mine 
economics, organization and care of labor, mine accounting and cost 
keeping, valuation of properties, welfare movements, etc. Prere- 
quisite: Coal Mining 82. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00; Associate Professor Calien, 
119 M. H. 

*85. Metallurgy. (2 Hrs.) General metallurgy; the metallurgy 

of iron and steel. Prerequisite: Chemistry 26 or equivalent. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; Associate Professor Callen, 
119 M. H. 



Tin Cou 1 1 i El i ' 

86. Mine Design. (3 Hrs.) The projection of mine and 
the design of mining plains to meet given condition 

working drawings, and estimates of material and 

I Mining 82 and n gistratlon In structural i 

First Bemester; M . 9:00 and 2:00, r 2 00; a 
Caixi !f, 119 M- 11- 

87. Mine Design. (8 Hrs.) Continuation of Mine 1 
which is a prerequisite. 

ond semester; t. Th.. 2:00, W., 9:00; A 
Cai ii n. no If. H. 

88. Mine Ventilation. (1 Hi) Open only to and 

Gas option. Mine gases and the principles of mine ventilation; mine 
explosions. 

Flrsi •• r; P., 0:fl : Asa i lab ; ': I W M I! 

89. Elementary Mineralogy. (2 Hrs.) A study of the ph> 
properties, occurrence, association and alteration of about one hum': 
and twenty-five of the common mineral species and varieties, parti- 
cularly the rock-forming minerals and those of economic import.!: 
The object of this course is to enable one to recognize at Bight the 
minerals that are likely to be met in connection with engineering 
work. Prerequisite: Chemistry 4 or equivalent. 

First semester; T.. 10:00; W., 2:00; Associate Prof< 
Cm. in. 119 If. H. 

90. Mine Surveying. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for de- 
grees in mining engineering. This course is given in the second and 
third weeks following the end of the sophomore year, in continuation 
of the one week course in Surveying 109. Practice supplementing 
mine surveying 80. 

Summer term; twelve working days, 8:00-12:00, and 1:00-5:00; 
Associate Professor Callex, 119 M. H. 

92. Oil and Gas Production. (2 His.) I ad royalties; drill- 
ing and management of wells; valuation of oil and gas proper- 
reports on properties and prospects; size and scope of oil and 
companies; markets and supply; varieties and uses of refinery and 
other products of oil and gas. Addresses by oil and gas producers 
and other experts. Prerequisite: Geology 13. 

Second semester; T. Th.. 8:00; Assistant Prof- <vor Pa* E, 11- M. H. 

93. Fuels. (2 His.) A study of the manufacture and utilization 
of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, wood, peat. coal. coke, petroleum 
and natural and artificial gas. Prerequisite, senior Standing. 

Second semester; M. W u 8:00; Associate ProfesSQI QALLBH, 119 
If. TT. 



172 West Virginia University Catalogue 

94. Non-ferrous Metallurgy. (2 Hrs.) A course treating of the 
chemical and physical properties, ores, and the smelting and refining of 
copper, lead, zinc, tin, gold and silver. Prerequisite: Metallurgy 85. 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00; Associate Professor Callen. 119 
M. H. 

95. Mining Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for 
the degree of B.S.E.M. Includes tests of steam engines, boilers, air- 
compressors, mine fans, and mine car wheels; mine rescue apparatus; 
methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide in ventilating currents; 
explosibility of methane and coal dust in mine air; experiments in 
coal washing and coal preparation. Prerequisite: Mechanical labor- 
atory 131. 

First semester; Th., 8:00; Associate Professor Callen and Pro- 
fessor Grumbein, 11 and 116 M. H. 

*96. Metallurgical Laboratory. (1 Hr.) Required of all candi- 
dates for the degree of B.S.E.M. Methods of coal sampling, crushing, 
pulverizing and screening, tests of coal to determine their suitability 
for coking; volatile matter, by-products and permanent gases in coals; 
proximate analysis of coals; analysis of mine gases; use of various 
types of pyrometers; heat determination, cupellation and amalgama- 
tion tests, etc. Prerequisite: Chemistry 26. 

Second semester; M., 2:00; Associate Professor Callen, 119 M. H. 

97. Oil and Gas Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Calorimeter tests on oil 
and natural gas; the testing of lubricating oils; determination of vis- 
cosity and flashing points; the analysis of gases; tests on the ab- 
sorption and compression methods of deriving gasoline from natural 
gas; etc. Prerequisite: Chemistry 16, Geology 13. 

Second semester; F., 8:00 and 2:00; Associate Professor 
Callen, 119 M. H. 

99. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors. Required of all 
candidates for degrees in mining engineering. The student is encour- 
aged to choose such subjects as will involve careful observation, col- 
lateral reading and the collection of data. 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor Callen, 
119 M. H. 



The I '"i LBGi "i Engine] rl 

RAILWAY AND HIGHWAY ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

Professor R. L Mobbm. 

♦100. Land Surveying. (2 Hrs.) Required Of til Candid 
degrees in civil and minim: engineering. Theory and practice of land 

surveying. Lectures, recitations, Held practice. 

Second semester; IL Th. f.. 10:00; practice, W. f 1 00 or B., 
8:00; Professor Mobbis snd Mr Bi ub, 218 st H. 

*101. Surveying. (1 Ilr.) Primarily for fir.M year students Re- 

quired for degrees in mechanical and electrical engineering. Theory 

and use of the compass, transit and !• vel, the laying out and measur- 
ing of areas and Leveling. Prerequisite: Plane trigonometry 

; T., 10:00, Th., 2:00; Professor BfOBBIS and Mr. 
Elair, 218 M. H 

102. Advanced Surveying. (12 Hrs.) Primarily for second 
students. Required of candidates for degrees in civil and mining 
engineering. Continuation of Surveying 100. Transit and stadia sur 
veys, leveling; plane table, elementary hydrographic surveying and 
field astronomy. 

First semester; recitation, M., 10:00; practice, S., 8:00; Prof- 
Mobbis, 218 M. H. 

103. Topographical Surveying. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for second 
year students. Required of candidates for degrees in civil engii 
ing. Theory and practice of topography, hydrographic and barone 
surveying. Lectures, recitations, field practice and map drawing. Pre- 
requisite: Land surveying loo. 

Second semester; lecture, If., 9:00; practice hours to be arranged; 
Professor BfOBBIS, 218 M. H. 

104. Railway Location. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for third year stu- 
dents. Required of all candidates for in civil engineering. 
Theory and practice of railroad BUrroylng. Lectures, recitations. Held 

work, and drawing. Searles' Field Engineering. PrerequU ■ Land 

surveying 100. 

Fir r. w. f.. 9:00; Professor Mobbis, 218 M H. 

105. Railway Construction and Maintenance. (3 Hrs.) Primarily 
for third year students. Required of all candidate., for degrees in 
civil engineering. Tunnels, trestles, track-work. • Imp. 

grading, masonry, and drawing Prerequisite Railway location 104 
Plrsl II w. F . 11:<K>; Pi 18 M H 



174 West Virginia University Catalogue 

106. Roads and Pavements. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for fourth year 
students in civil engineering. Required of all candidates for degrees 
in civil engineering. Location, construction and maintenance; study 
and comparison of various types of roads; road making materials, 
lectures, recitations and field work. 

First semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Professor Morris, 218 M. H. 

107. Railroad Economy. (2 Hrs.) Optional for fourth year stu- 
dents in civil engineering. General theory of railroad location; effect 
of grades, curvature, and distance on operating expenses and revenue; 
railroad finance and management. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; Professor Morris, 218 M. H. 

108. Highway Economics. (2 Hrs.) Optional for fourth year 
students in civil engineering. Continuation of Roads and pavements 
106, with special reference to permanent improvements and mainten- 
ance of existing roads. Re-surveys, re-location, drainage, etc 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00; Professor Morris, 218 M. H. 

109. Surveying. (1 Hr.) Required of all candidates for degrees 
in civil and mining engineering. Surveying practice supplementing 
Courses Nos. 100, 102, 103 and 80. Prerequisite: Topographical sur- 
veying 103 or Mine surveying 80. 

Summer term; first six working days, 8:00-12:00, and 1:00-5:00; 
Professor Morris. 210 M. H. 

110. Railroad Surveying. (2 Hrs.) Required of candidates for 
degrees in civil engineering. Surveying practice supplementing Rail- 
way location 104. Prerequisite: Railway location 104. 

Summer term; the first twelve working days, 8:00-12:00, and 1:00- 
5:00; Professor Morris, 218 M. H. 

113. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) Optional thesis requirement for the degree 
of B.S.C.E. (See page 143). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Morris, 218 
M. H. 

SANITARY ENGINEERING 

For courses in this subject see pages 179-180. 



The ( "i. 1. 1 1 ■ Engineer] i: ~ 

STEAM, GAS, AND EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING. 

Dean C. R. Jojies and Professor Gbumbdn. 

120. Steam and Gas Machinery. CI Hrs.) Required m third 

students in civil engineering. Elementary thermodynamics, 
properties, calorimeters, fuels, boil* 

aes, turbines Arranged for the selectiTe design of p rl 
a plant. PrereQuisite: Physics 7. 

First semester; Iff. T. P., 10:00; Professor E 21 Iff. H. 

*121. Thermodynamics of Engineering. (8 ttTS.) Primaril, 

third rear men. Required of all candidates for degrees In mechanical, 
electrical and mining engineering. Mechanical theory of heat, thermo- 
dynamics nf gBSefl and vapors with special application to Steam and 

other heat engines, compressed air and refrigeration, Prerequii 

PhysiCfl 6 and 7. and Integral calculus. 

Fi: Iff. \V. P., 9:00; Profe- ::i i\. lis Iff. H. 

*122. Heat Engines. (8 H jiiired of cand 

in mechanical, electrical and mining engineering. Continuation of 
Thermodynamics 121. Expansive working of steam and gas, princi] 
of design, construction and operation of steam air COmpi 

Ines, and refrigerating machim 

Second semester: M W. P., W, 118 M. H. 

123. Power Plant Design. (3 I Irs.) Open to fourth year and - 
students. Required of candidates for degrees in mechanical. 

minin g and electrical engineering. The study of steam, gas and 
hydro-elecjtric plants; selection of prime movers and auxiliary ma- 
chinery for central and isolated stations; location of the plant; ar- 
rangement, suh-division into units and installation; economics, or- 
ganization and management of power plants. Prerequisite: Ther- 
modynamics 121. 

First semester; II W. P., 8:00; D- 
i-.fi v 126 Iff. H. 

124. Steam Boilers. (2 Hrs.) Elective for seniors H< 
value of fuels, combustion, economical production of steam; appli- 
cation of theory and practice in the design of steam I him- 
neys, and accessories; strain piping and distribution. 1 

Machine design 35 and Thermodynamics 121, 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Gai rasur, 11^ ML n. 

125. Steam Turbines. (?> Hrs.) Optional for fourth year stu I 
in mechanical engineering, and for graduate students Flow of 



1T6 Wist Virginia University Catalogue 

urated and superheated steam and the theory and design of the 
steam turbine. Prerequisite: Heat engines 122. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Professor Grumbein, 209 M. H. 

126. Gas Engines and Gas Engineering. (3 Hrs.) For fourth 
year and graduate students. Optional for fourth year students in 
mechanical engineering. The study of fuel gases, gas production 
and transmission, gas engines, etc. Prerequisite: Heat engines 122. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00; Dean Jones, 125 M. H. 

*127. Heating and Ventilating. (3 Hrs.) Open to fourth year and 
graduate students. Optional for students in mechanical engineering. 
Principles, comparative merits and design of various systems of ven- 
tilating, and heating by hot air, hot water, steam, electricity. A 
careful study of the systems in the different University buildings. 
Prerequisite: Thermodynamics 121, or Steam and gas machinery 120. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 8:00; Professor Grumbein, 118 M. H. 

128. Development and Utilization of Power. (3 Hrs.) For fourth 
year and graduate students. Optional for fourth year students in 
mechanical engineering. Historical development of heat engines and 
motors, with special reference to economy in power production and 
manufacturing interests. Prerequisite: Power plant design 123. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Professor Emory, 221 M. H. 

130. Mechanical Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for third year 
students. Required of all candidates for degrees in engineering. 
Theory, calibration and use of steam engine indicators, steam gages, 
thermometers; calorimeter tests of coal and natural gas; testing lubri- 
cating oil; analysis of flue gases; efficiency tests of simple engines 
and pumps. Prerequisite: Physics 7 and Statics 70, and accompanying 
Steam and gas machinery 120 or Thermodynamics 121. 

First semester; first section, S., 8:00; second section, F., 2:00; 
Professor Grumbein, 11 M. H. 

131. Mechanical Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates 
for degrees in engineering. Continuation of Mechanical laboratory 
130. Tests of wrought iron, cast iron, steel, timber, stone, brick, ce- 
ment, and concrete. Prerequisite: Mechanical laboratory 130 and 
Mechanics of materials 71. 

Second semester; first section, S., 8:00; second section, Th., 2:00; 
Professor Grumbein. 11 M. H. 

132. Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for fourth year 
students. Required of all candidates for degrees in mechanical, elec- 
trical and mining engineering. Tests of boilers and engines, air com- 
pressors, fans, and blowers, hydraulic motors, steam heating appara- 



Tin ('"in Gl OF l-'.N'.iMi.i;; 17: 

tus, etc.; valve Betting; flow of strain through oriflcei and pi] 

application of Ilirn's analysis. PrereQUlsit 

131. 

First semester; T. E r Giumumv, 1.", M H. 

133. Engineering Laboratory. (2 I! ;uired of all cand: : 

for degreec in mechanical and electrical engineering. ( >p»-n to p 
uate students. Continuation of Laboratory 122. Combii ta of 

performances of boilers, m^ines, electrical and other power tn 
mission machinery; testing of power plan 1 eh work. 

Prerequisite: Engineering laboratory I 

Second semester; Th., S:0<">; Professor QsUMBKIK, 1." It H. 

134. Engineering Laboratory. Open only to graduates. Commer- 
cial tests and research work. Prerequisite: Engineering laboratory 
133. Credit will he given on the basis of the time spent in the lab- 
oratory and the progress of the student. 

Hours to be arr; ; - and Professor Grimi 

135. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) Optional thesis requirement for the d. 

of B.S.M.E. Investigation or original research on some special topic 
relating to steam, gas or experimental engineering. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Dean Jonks and Professor 

Gkimki IV 

136. Highway Laboratory. Open to fourth year and graduate 
students in civil, mechanical and mining engineering. Testing of 
stone, brick, sand, clay, concrete and bituminous and other materials 
entering into road construction, etc. Credit will he given on h. 

of time spent in the laboratory and the progress of the student. 
Hours to be arranged; Dean Jonfs. M. H. 



L78 West Virginia University Catalogue 

STRUCTURAL AND HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING. 

Professor Davis. 

141. Roofs and Bridges. (4 Hrs.) Primarily for third year stu- 
dents. Required of all candidates for the degree of B.S.C.E. Stresses 
in plate-girder bridges, and simple roof and bridge trusses; methods 
for determining the various loads by both analytical and graphical 
methods. Complete design of a wooden roof truss, including detailed 
drawing. Prerequisite: Mechanics of materials 71. 

Second semester; M. T. Th., 10:00, and Th., 2:00-5:00; Professoi 
Davis, 219 M. H. 

142. Bridge Design. (4 Hrs.) Primarily for fourth year students. 
Required of all candidates for the degree of B.S.C.E. Computations 
and drawings are made for the complete design of a riveted or pin- 
connected Pratt truss bridge. The computations determine the sec- 
tions of all members, as well as the details, splices, riveting, etc. 
Prerequisite: Roofs and bridges 141. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00-12:00; W. F., 2:00-5:00; Professor 
Davis, 217 M. H. 

143. Advanced Structures. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for fourth year 
and graduate students. Required of all candidates for the degree of 
B.S.C.E. Loading and stresses in cantilevers, continuous girders and 
trusses, swing bridges, and metal arches including the two-hinged 
and the three-hinged types in the spandrel-braced and arch-ribbed 
forms. Prerequisite: Roofs and bridges 141. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Professor Davis, 219 M. H. 

144. Structural Engineering. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for fourth year 
students. Required of all candidates for the degree of B.S.M.E. A 
course of two recitations per week devoted to the study of the loads 
and stresses in simple beam and truss bridges and in roof trusses. 
Prerequisite: Mechanics of materials 71. 

First semester; T. W., 11:00; Professor Davis, 219 M. H. 

145. Steel Building Design. (3 Hrs.) For fourth year and gradu- 
ate students. Elective. Mill and office buildings of steel. Design 
of trusses, beams, columns, and bracing for all loads; critical study 
of details, methods of erection, weights and costs. A small mill 
building is completely designed and shop drawings made for same. 
Prerequisite: Roofs and bridges 141. 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Davis. 219 M. H. 



The ( Jolu oi oj Engineering 

146. Foundations and Masonry Construction. (8 llr.v) Primarily 

for fourth year and graduate student! Required of all cai 
for the degree of B 9 C E 

cylinder piers, pneumatic caissons, open caissons, and other foi 
of bridge foundations; building foundations and methods <>f under] 
ning the same. Masonry construction Prerequisifc 

materials 71. and Mechanical 1&1 

Fir 5:00; W, F . 1:00; Profeei it Dai is 

M II 

147. Concrete Construction. M Mrs.) Primarily for fourth 

and graduate students. Required of all candidates tor U 
B.S.C.E Constituent elements and pro; 

from the experimental and theoretical standpoints. Mechanics on 
lying the det »lumns, and floor 

mental Investigations and methods of construction. Prerequisil 

Found:'. t ions and masonry construction 146, and Roofs and 
141. 

• nd Bemeeter; T. Th., 9:00; W. P., - or Davis, 

m it. n. 

148. Sanitary Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for fourth 
students. Required of all candidates for the degree of 

study of the design, construction, and maintenance of and 

appurtei modern methods of sewage disposal. ' 

Hydraulic* 
Fit 

149. Water Supply Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Primarily tor fourth 
year students. Required of all candidates for the degree of B.S.' 
The quantity of water required fi and towns, hydrology Of 
drainage basins, steam flow and ground supp! ~n of reser- 
voirs. Btandpipes, etc.; the qualitj r and the various m- 

of water purification. Prerequisite: Hydraulics 

Fir- ter; If. W v.. ^■.■". I •• Davis, 111 *t H. 

150. Hydraulic Construction and Water Power Engineering. 
(3 Hrs.) Primarily for fourth year and graduate Students. R 

of all candidates for the d B.S.G B. in Option 1. Design and 

construction of high masonry dams. Including a problem of I 
plete design, with Working drawim tl masonry dam. 

engineering features of water powi -quisite: Hydraulics 

Second semester; T. Th. r M H 



180 West Virginia University Catalogue 

151. Hydraulic Measurements. (1 Hr.) Primarily for fourth year 
and graduate students. Volume of water flowing in open channels by 
floats and current meters. This work is made particularly effective 
through the accessibility of the Monongahela river. Measurement of 
small quantities by orifices, weirs, and other devices. Periodicals 
searched for experimental data. Prerequisite: Hydraulics 73. 

First semester; M., 2:00-5:00; Professor Davis, 219 M. H. 

152. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) For fourth year students. Optional thesis 
requirement for the degree of B.S.C.E. Special design, investigation 
or original research on some assigned topic relating to structural, 
hydraulic or sanitary engineering. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Davis. 

153. Sewage and Water Purification Works. (2 Hrs.) Elective 
for fourth year students. A continuation of courses 148 and 149. A 
detailed study of the principles and practice of the design and oper- 
ation of water and sewage purification works. Prerequisites: San- 
itary engineering 148 and Water supply engineering 149. (Omitted 
1918-19.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

154. Statically Indeterminate Structures. (4 Hrs.) For graduate 
students. A continuation of Advanced structures 143. Study of vari- 
ous methods of design of statically indeterminate structures such as 
principle of least work, use of auxiliary load of unity, methods of 
angle changes, elastic changes, etc. Theory of flat slabs; secondary 
stresses, etc. Prerequisite: Advanced structures 143. 

First or second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Davis, 
219 M. H. 

155. Advanced Bridge Design. (4 Hrs.) For graduate students. 
Computation and drawings made for some type of statically indeter- 
minate structure. Prerequisites: Advanced structures 143 and Bridge 
design 142. 

First or second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Davis, 
219 M. H. 

156. Materials of Construction. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for fourth year 
students. Required of all candidates for the degree of B.S.C.E. A 
study of the materials used in engineering construction, including 
iron, steel, copper and its alloys, timber, concrete, stone, brick, etc. 
Prerequisite: Mechanics of materials 71. 

First semester; M. F., 10:00; Professor Davis, 219 M. H. 



Tm. * '"l.i.i Engineering 1s1 

GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS. 

160. Building Superintendence. (2 Mr- ) An elective COUI 

fourth jrear and graduate students In engineering and othen 

the preparation. Study of construction and Inspection Of DOildil 

inspection of gas fitting, electric and heatii ' I 

and oontract8. PrereQuialte: Kinetics 72. 

Cither semester; noon to be arranged; Exobt, 121 m h 

161. Contracts and Specifications. (2 Mrs.) Open to fourth 

and graduate students. Required of all candidates for de g r ee s in 

civil and mechanical engineering. Essential! Of a contract; applica- 
tions of the law of agency, Balee, partnership, and pri • 'ora- 
tions; rights, duties, and liahiliti- :uractors; standard sppci- 
fications. 

If. \v. P., 8:00; Professor Bmobt, 221 If. H. 

162. Engineering Society. (1 Hr.) Primarily for third year stu- 
dents. Required of all candidates for degrees in engineerinc:. Mem- 
bership, attendance and active participation in the Enginering Society 
Bee -i" i ial announcements, page 138. 

Throughout the year; bi-weekly, F.. 6:45 p. m.; Profe<5or Emory, 
122^ If. II. 

163. Engineering Society. (1 Hr.) For fourth year and graduate 
students. Required of all candidates for degrees in engineering. Con- 
tinuation of Engineering Society 162. 

Throughout the year; bi-weekly; F., 6:45 p. m.; Professor Emory. 
22fi If. H. 

164. Summer Practice. (2 Ilrs.i Required of all candidates for 
degrees in engineering. At least six weeks of practical experience in 
some branch of engineering activity, preferably of a character that 
will articulate with the student's major subjects. Studentl an- rec- 
ommended to spend all vacation periods in practical work hut under 

exceptional circumstance* the Faculty of the College of ring 

may permit the Substitution of an approved practical OOUrsC 'ak"n 

in residence. Application for Bummer credit should be ma.;. 

beginning the work; and the work done should he certified and re- 
ported in accordance with the special rules for Summer Practice, on 
or before October 1st, after the work has been <\^n>> Work ma;, 
dor- n'on per 



182 West Virginia University Cataix>gue 

SUMMER SCHOOL IN MINING. 

The Short Course in Coal Mining offered by the Department of 
Mining Engineering gives an opportunity to operators, officials and 
employees of the mining companies to obtain instruction pertaining to 
th< lr work. The subjects covered in the Short Course are: prevention 
of accidents, explosives, methods of working, timbering, mine gases, 
mine ventilation, hoisting, haulage, mine drainage, safety lamps, mine 
management, electricity in mines, and mine fires and explosions. In 
addition, courses for advanced students in mechanical drawing and 
mine surveying are offered. 

Special attention is given to students desirous' of preparing them- 
selves for the teaching of mining classes under the Smith-Hughes Act. 

Through the cooperation of the United States Bureau of Mines 
instruction in first aid and mine rescue w r ork are given by the instruc- 
tors of one of the Rescue Cars of the Bureau. The car is placed at 
Morgantown for two or three weeks of the Short Course. 

At the close of the Short Course the Department of Mines of West 
Virginia will hold an examination for mine foremen and firebosses. 

Tuition is free. It is believed that $50 to $60 should cover all 
necessary expenses for the six w r eeks, including traveling. 

The seventh annual session of the Short Course in Coal Mining 
will begin on Monday, June 16 and continue until Saturday, July 26. 
1919. For further information write for Bulletin 5, Series 4, School 
of Mines. 

MINING EXTENSION COURSES. 

Extension courses in mining are offered under the direction of the 
University at various mining centers throughout the state. The work 
of instruction in these courses is carried on conjointly by a University 
instructor and local instructor, who may be the mine engineer or 
the superintendent or foreman of the coal company. The University 
instructor visits each center from two to four times a month and 
supplements the work of the local instructor by means of lectures, 
demonstrations, lantern slides and motion pictures. Special stress 
is laid upon the safety of the workmen. Lectures are also given on 
such topics of general interest as sanitation, domestic science, care 
and health of children, etc. 

For further information concerning the Summer School of Mining 
or the Extension Courses in Mining, apply to Professor A. C. Callen, 
head of the Department of Mining Engineering, Morgantown, W. Va. 

SCHOOL OF GOOD ROADS. 

The School of Good Roads was organized to meet the demand for 
instruction in highway construction and maintenance and to comply 
with the requirements of Section 17, Chapter 41 of the acts of the 
Legislature of 1913. Since the repeal of this act it has been continued 
under the joint supervision of the University and the State Road Com- 
mission. It is open to all who are interested in good roads regardless 
of entrance requirements or previous experience. 

The session of this school at the University consists of a four day 
conference of all the state road officials followed by a three day school 
for general instruction. 

For further information or for special bulletin apply to Dean C. R. 
Jones. 






THE COLLEGE OF 
AGRICULTURE 

FACULTY AND STAFF. 

XK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M. LL.D., P 

JOHN LEE COULTER, A M . Pa I 
ment Station 

WILLIAM HORACE ALDERMAN" Horttcuttwri 

and .1- ting J > 

THOMAS CLARK ATKESON, Ph.D., Pi dry, 

rit us 

RL WOODDELL SHEETS,' L.s.v i .. MS. Pro/< ^or 0/ Ini 

ha ml r 11 

LEONARD MARION I'EAIRS. B.S.Au:.. MS Wf 0/ £/. ' 

FORREST WILBUR STEMPLE, AT... M.S.. Professor of Agronomy 

CHARLES HERMAN WINKLER, Ph.D., Professor <■■ 

■ onai Edm at 

ERNEST L. ANTHONY, Pi 1 

RACHEL HARTSHORN COLWELL, A M.. A - 


AUGUSTUS LUEDER, D.V.M.. ' 

ANDREW JACKSON DADISMAN. R S.A- ;:.. M .- 
of Form Mat 

EDGAR LEWIS ANDREWS, R.S.A Of of Poultry 

Husbandry 

JOHN JONATHAN YOKE itOMt Pro mat 

Hu*b<th 

ROBERT MUNDHENK SALTER. MS., Assistant P 



1 On leave of abseru • pinning With 

Army 0\ • rion in France. 

'On leave of absence. With the United States Department of Agriculture. 



184 West Virginia University Catalogue 

HARRY WYATT RICHEY, B.S.Agr., Assistant Professor of Horticul- 
ture 
HARLEY LUCIUS CRANE, BjS.Agr., Instructor in Horticulture 

NINA CATHERINE REILLY, B.S.Edu., Instructor in Home Economics 

LESLIE ANKROM, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Horticulture 

PAUL CHARLES ROUZER, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Agricultural Edu- 
cation 

GLADYS GRIMSHAW GILL, B.S., Instructor in Home Economics 

CLARA ROWENA SCHMIDT, B.S.Edu., Instructor in Home Economics 

VALERIE ELIZABETH SCHULTZ, A.B., Instructor in Home Econo?nics 

GEORGE LEE .SCHUSTER, Instructor in Agronomy. 

R09C0E ELM'S STEVENSON, Instructor in Agronomy. 

MARIE DE VERE, B.S., Instructor in Home Economics. 



BERT HOLMES KITE, M.S., Chemist 

NAHUM JAMES GIDDINGS, M.S., Plant Pathologist 

WILLIAM EARL RUMSEY, B.S.Agr., State Entomologist 

HORACE ATWOOD, M.S.Agr., Poultryman 

LEE IRVING KNIGmyPH.D., Plant Physiologist. 

ISAAC SCOTT COOK, JR., B.S.Agr., Research Agronomist 

THEODORE CLINTON McILVAINE, M.S., Tobacco Investigations 

LUTHER FRANCIS .SUTTON, B.S., B.S.Agr., Assistant Horticulturist 
and Superintendent of Reymann Memorial Experiment Farm 

ANTHONY BERG, 2 B.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist 

CHARLES EDWARD WEAKLEY, JR., Assistant Chemist 

FRANK BATSON KUNST, A.B., Assistant Chemist 

JAN HENDRIOK BERGHUIS-KRAK, B.S., Assistant Chemist 



1 In cooperation with the University of Chicago. Resigned January 1, 1919 

2 On leave of absence from October 1 to December 1, 1919. In United States 

Military Service. 



The Coi lv " 

ROSS IIO.MAX rUCKWILLER, 
Invi stigations 

CHARLES PATE 9ARLE, B.S., Assistant in Farm U 

JAMBS BENSON BLANDTORD, Hortieultur tendeni 



OALVIN Et TITLOW/ ZMn Lffricttlfurol I 

CHARLES HENRY HARTLEY, B.fi ton! to Di ; ul- 

tural Extension 

NAT T. FRAME, 1 B v. 8tat< Agent, Supervisor of County Agri 

tumi Agents 

BELTOX BONNER EZELL,' B.S., Assistant BtaU Ag 

HU SWISHER VANDERVORT,' B.S.Agb., Assistant 8tat( Agent 

William HENRY KLxniucK. B.S.. State Agent, m Charge of 

Boys' Clubs 

niAilLES ELLSWORTH STOCKDALE. B.s.v.i:. Agricultural Editor 

STUART ALVERTON CODY. Assistant Poultry Club Agent 

MARION MARTHA HEPWORTH, 1 B.S., Associate Professor of Homr 
(Monties (Extension). 

SADIE ray c.rsKMAx; B.S., Assistant in Homr Economics (Ex- 
tension) in charge of Girls' Clubs 

HARRY ORAL HENDERSON,' M.S.. Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

U nsion.) 

ROBERT BARCLAY DUSTMAN, 1 B.8.AGE., Instructor in Agronomu 

(Extension) 

WITHROW REYNOLDS LEGGK." M.S., Instructor i» Eorticulturx 

(Extension) 

KATHRYN ALGER, A.B.. B.S.A \tani in Homr ECOUOU 



1 In cooperation with the T\ B llture. 

•On leave of absence during I 



4 Resigned. April 1. 



•Resigned May 1, 1919. 
•On leave e since January 1. 1 91 s in United States Military 

Service 



186 West Virginia University Catalogue 

EDWARD L. SHAW, 1 B.S.Agk., Instructor in Animal Husbandry (Ex- 
tension) 

LAWRENCE VINCENT STARKEY, B.S., M.S.Agr., Instructor in Animal 
Husbandry (Extension) 

HARRY HORTON FAIRBANK, D.V.M., Instructor in Veterinary 
Science (Extension) 

ROBERT REED HOGUE, 1 Cheese Specialist (Extension) 

DEE CRANE, 2 Potato Specialist (Extension) 

SAMUEL LOWELL DODD, JR., 1 Instructor in Plant Pathology (Ex- 
tension) 

ROSS B. JOHNSTON, Assistant Agricultural Editor. 
FACULTY COMMITTEES. 

Agricultural Students' Courses and Hours: Dean COULTER, Pro- 
fessors ALDERMAN, PEA1RS, and WINKLER. 

Home Economics Students' Courses and Hours: Dean COULTER, 
Associate Professor COLWELL, and Miss GILL. 

Farm Operations: Associate Professor DADISMAN, Professor STEM- 
PLE, and Assistant Professor YOKE. 



1 In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. 

2 Resigned March 1, 1919. 



Tin. < <»i.i.i.,,i OP AORICI i.ti i.i 

ORGANIZATION. 

ah ihr agricultural and borne economlci work of the Qnh 
inized under the Collet ricultare. For the pun 

ministration the college la divided Into lour branches, vis: 

I. Investigation and reeearch aa carried on at aforgantown and 
throughout th< the staff of the Weal Vlr ricultural 
l&xperlmeni station. 

II. Resident instruction for students pursuing agricultural stud' 

• mown, in the cl and laborat usually 

organised for college work. 

in. Resident instruction in home econom i 

IV. Extension work for all citlseni ot the state who desire in- 
struction in agriculture and home economics while living on the 
farm. This work Is given hy the Department of Agricultural 

tension. 

These primary divisions of the work of the Ooll< riculture 

should he clearly distinguished. Some of its staff art- engaged in col- 
instruction, experiment station tension ' 

of them give their entire time fo instruction; a few ghre their 
entire time to experiment station work an.: | are engaged en- 

tirely in extension work. Those who do no teaching are so indie • 
in the above list of the faculty and staff. 

I. THE WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL 
EXPERIMENT STATION. 

The Experiment Station is a distinct and separafc :nent 

of the University, and was established by the Board Of - in 

1887, by authority of an act of Congress known as the Hatch 
which was passed on the 2nd day of March of that year. Further 
support was civen by an act of Congress known as the Adams 
approved June 30, 1906. From the appropriations made by C 
under th< lie Station derives an annual income of thirty thous- 

and dollars. Section 2 of the aforesaid act fully states the oh 
and purpose of the Experiment Station as follow 

"'That it shall he the object and duty of said experiment station 
to conduct original researches or verify experiments on the physi- 
ology of plants and animals; the d | which they rally 
subject with the remedies for the same; the chemical COmpOf 
useful plants at their different Stages of crowth; the compare 

advantages of rotative cropping as pursued under van - of 

crops: the capacity of new plants or trees for acclimation; the analy- 
sis of soils and water: the chemical composition of manures, nat- 
ural or artificial, with experim. their coir: 



188 West Virginia University Catalogue 

effects on crops of different kinds; the adaption and value of grasses 
and forage plants; the composition and digestibility of the different 
kinds of foods for domestic animals; the scientific and economic 
questions involved in the production of butter and cheese; and such 
other researches and experiments bearing directly on the agricultural 
industry of the United States as may in each case be deemed ad- 
visable, having due regard to the varying conditions and needs of 
the respective states and territories." 

The State Legislature has made appropriations for horticulture, 
live stock, tobacco and poultry investigations, and printing., aggregating 
forty-five thousand dollars for the current fiscal year. It has also ap- 
propriated fifteen thousand dollars a year for two years for farm build- 
ings and implements in connection with the farms presented to the 
University for the College of Agriculture by Monongalia County 

Bulletins and annual reports setting forth results of experiments 
and investigations conducted at the station are published for gratui- 
tous distribution, and will be mailed to any citizen of the state ap- 
plying for them. 

The Experiment Station is engaged solely in research and inves- 
tigation, the results of which, with those of similar institutions, form 
the basis of the teaching of the College of Agriculture including the 
work of the Extension Division. 

For further information concerning the work of the Experiment 
Station write the director. 



II. INSTRUCTION IN AGRICULTURE. 

AIM AND SCOPE. 

The training given by the College of Agriculture is designed to 
fit its students for farm life, or for work as teachers, field work- 
ers, or investigators of agricultural subjects. A large part of the 
course consists of technical work in the various branches of agricul- 
ture. The aim in these courses is to make plain the principles under- 
lying agricultural science, and to give as much practice work as facili- 
ties will permit, so that the student will receive a training fitting him 
for efficient work. The curriculum is planned to give the student a 
general knowledge of all phases of agriculture, but at the same time we 
afford him opportunity to specialize in the subjects in which he is 
particularly interested. A thorough training in the general sciences 
underlying scientific agriculture is given. 

In addition to the technical work in agriculture and general 
science, courses in English, sociology, history and economics are re- 
quired in the College of Arts and Sciences, as the college hopes to 



THE ( '<'I.i.k«,i: OF A..KH ■'. l.i 

train its students to be not only prO&IO«llm farmers or educator! but 
good citizens and leaden in rural lit"«\ 

Opportunity is also offered thoee irho vrtali to pre] 

teaching of agriculture in vocational agricultural schools Of secondary 
le, in high schools or normal schools or for work in rural ichool 
supervision, to take * kltment " • 

tion and Agricultural education, thus securing the D4 rain- 

■r such work. 

EQUIPMENT. 

In 1915 an appropriation was made by the Sta 
the construction of a modern agricultural hall. This appropriation 
increased in 1917 to $200,000 and the new building Oglebey Hall. 
- completed and occupied February 15, 1919. This building which 

^S feet lone ami four si >n the basement floor 

the creamery and dairy laboratories, a four-chambered cold stoi 
plant and ice machine, the station mailing room and laboratories for 
horticulture, animal husbandry and agronomy. The first floor Ifl 
voted to offices and reading rooms, plant physiology laboratory, and 
the food and textile laboratories of the Home Economics Department. 
The second floor houses the Extension Division and provides 
recitation rooms and sewing laboratories, on the upper floor are the 
departments of botany, plant pathology, entomology, farm management, 
poultry husbandry and veterinary science. 

The College of Agriculture now has TOO acres of land lyinc I 
to the university buildings. This land has been definitely organ 
into a series of five farms operated respectively by the animal hus- 
bandry, dairy husbandry, poultry husbandry, agronomy and horticul- 
tural departments. 

There have recently been erected a barn and j vilion on 

the lower campus, a horse barn and beef cattle barn on the animal 
husbandry farm. The barn on the agronomy farm has been remodeled 
and there is now under construction on the poultry farm a three-story 
building for feed storage, incubation and brooding, together with 
several other small colony brooding houses. 

With Oglebay Hall, the old experiment building, the old 

horticultural hall, the new barns and live stock hall, and the new 

- and cold frames, equipne lilable f 

thorough and complete training in th< I of farming. 

Here are found laboratories fully equipped for the most thorough 
scientific work. Laboratories are provided for all phases of dairy hus- 
bandry, animal husbandry, poultry, veterina: ronomy. hor- 
ticulture, entomology, plant pathology, farm management and agricul- 



190 West Virginia University Catalogue 

tural education, and the greenhouses, farms and barns afford facilities 
for practical work in which the principles taught in the classroom and 
laboratory may be tested and put into practice. 

REYMANN MEMORIAL FARM. 

Through the gift of Anton Reymann and Paul O. Reymann of 
Wheeling, West Virginia, executors of the estate of Lawrence A. 
Reymann, deceased, the University came into possession on March 1st, 
1917, of the Reymann Memorial Experiment Farm, including 930 acres 
of land on the Capon River in Hardy County, and a herd of more than 
100 head of pure bred Ayrshire cattle. The farm is given for the use 
of the College of Agriculture for experimental work in the breeding 
and maintenance of Ayrshire dairy cattle. 

There is located on the farm a fully equipped cheese factory 
which is turning out a fancy grade of American full cream cheese. 
The products of this factory won a silver medal at the National Dairy 
Show at Columbus, Ohio, and received a score exceeded only by 
cheese from the famous factories of Wisconsin. The exceptional 
quality of the cheese from this factory has created a demand for its 
products far in excess of its present output, and an attempt is being 
made to promote the industry in this and other regions of the state. 

Experimental orchards were planted on the farm in the spring 
of 1918 and definite investigations are under way in the following 
lines: plant pathology, horticulture, animal husbandry, agronomy, 
dairy husbandry and veterinary science. The new buildings and im- 
provements provided by the Legislature in 1919 will greatly facilitate 
this work. 



Tin: ( mi. 1 1.1,1. oi Agriculture 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

For admission to the College culture the candidate must 

have credit for fifteen units obtained by examination or on <■ 
from a duly accredited secondary school. <»t the fifteen units which 
must be offered ror admission, nine unit leflnitely ; 

as follow 

l English: students are admitted to English l <>n completion ol 

a four-year high school course in English, or its :it. and re- 

lit for three or four units, as the instructor and the work 
done and ' ■• rtifled Just 







a Language: Two units of one language are required. 



Mathematics: One unit of algebra and one of plane 

are requi: 

1. History: one unit is required. 

One unit is required of either physics, chem: 
botany, zoology, or bio! 

ugh from the following list to < 

French 1 to 3 units 

man l to 3 

Latin 1 t0 4 

ek 1 to ;•; 

Mathematics 

1 to 3 

ice (including history, civics 
and economics) 1 to i 

Vocational subjects (including agricul- 
ture, commercial subjects, household 
arts, and manual training) 1 to 3 

Drawing (free hand and d al) 1 to I 

Prospective students are urged to take free hand drawing if it 
can be secured in the secondary school. 

Other subjects which ha. tgnised place in the first-class 

high schools will also be accepted by the Committee on Kntr;. 
Students who have completed an accepted four-year high school 
course, even if they have not taken the required courses, will be ad- 
mitted and an opportunity will be given to make up the requ 
work later. 

A single unit of a modem lai: aot Latin or Greek) will be 

accepted but only if the student has in addition the required two units 
of some foreign langui 

For a detailed statement of the amount of work required for 
each unit of entrance credit 



192 \Yest Virginia University Catalogue 

FARM OPERATIONS. 

The faculty strongly recommends that students who have not had 
practical farm experience spend at least one year on a first-class 
general farm before pursuing the course. It is impossible for students 
who have not had farm experience to secure the fullest benefit of the 
course. 

On entering the college, each student will be examined as to his 
ability to perform the various operations necessary to carry on farm 
work and as to his knowledge of farming. A failure to pass this ex- 
amination will not exclude him from college; another opportunity 
will be provided at the beginning of the second year to pass off the 
requirement. If the student then fails he will be required to remain 
at the college farm during the summer vacation between his second 
and third year, or to work for the same period on some farm approved 
by the committee in charge. Weekly reports of the farm operations 
will, be required and he will receive his final examination of the sub- 
ject at the beginning of the junior year. In case of continued fail- 
ure, the student's degree will be withheld until he shall satisfy the 
requirements herein described. This work will be reported on as 
a preparatory study, and will have no credit value as a part of the 
required work of the course. 

The examinations will test the student's knowledge of everyday 
farm operations such as those indicated in the following list: 

(1) Harnessing a team; (2) Naming parts of harness; (3) Hitch- 
ing team to farm implements; (4) Plowing; (5) Driving a team; 
(6) Feeding animals; (7) Distinguishing common breeds of farm ani- 
mals; (8) Handling farm animals; (9) Milking cows; (10) Distin- 
guishing common breeds of poultry; (11) Knowledge of yields of 
a few farm' crops; (12) Knowledge of common practices in planting the 
ordinary farm crops; (13) Identifying a few common varieties of ap- 
ples; (14) Familiarity with common vegetables of the farm garden, 
and (15) Familiarity with common farm machinery. 



\ 

DEGREES. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Credits Required. 

The degree of B Lgrlcnltnre will b. 

ferred upon any student ore entr 

ments, and offers one hundred -and forty-four hours credit f<>r ooll 

cour 

Th- iter hour" is the standard for computing the amount 

of work required for graduation. The "hour" i amount 

of work done in one m and in one recitation 

hour with two preparation hours i r in three hours' prai 

or laboratory work requiring no outside prepar.it ion. N 
permitted to register for less than fifteen hours or more than twenty 
hours of work in any one semester. 

Classification of Students. 

To be classified as a conditioned freshman in the Collet 
Agriculture a student must have credit for at least thirteen 
entrance requirements; to be classified as a regular fre-hmen he 
must have fulfilled all entrance requirements. To be classified fti 
sophomore he must have credit for 26 hours of college worl 
junior, 64 hours; and ai >r, 100 hours. 

Summer Courses. 

It will be noted that many of the cour-- in the follow- 

ing pages are also given in the Summer School. In many ca>- 
courses may be pursued to better advantage durinir the summer. 
Students who are admitted with advanced standing or students who 
for any reason may be compelled to do so. may complete the | 
scribed course for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture by 
taking full work for two summer sessions (12 hours each) and three 
academic years, hut only students of exceptional ability or ma- 
should undertake such a curriculum, which should be arran- 
with the dean in advance. 

Admission with Advanced Standing. 

Students from other institutions will be gtren credit for work 
already done in accordance with the penera! nd- 



194 West Virginia University Catalogue 

ing (See page 32), but at least one year of resident work will be 
required for the baccalaureate degree in agriculture. 

Required and Elective Subjects. 

Of the one hundred and forty-four hours required for the degree, 
eighty-eight are prescribed for all students, as indicated in the curri- 
culum below. Students who are not required to take military science 
must substitute elective credits. The remaining fifty-six hours' credit 
must be elected from such courses as may be approved by the class 
officer. Of these not less than fifteen nor more than thirty-one hours 
must be elected from the College of Arts and Sciences or other colleges. 
The remainder must be elected from the College of Agriculture. (See 
pages 195 to 199.) 

Class Officer. 

The dean of the College of Agriculture will act as class officer 
(See page 34) for all freshmen and sophomore students in the College 
of Agriculture. The head of the department in which a student elects 
to take his major will be his class officer for the junior and senior 
years. 

• Graduate Work. 

Graduates of the College of Agriculture, or from institutions with 
equivalent work, may be admitted to the University as candidates 
for the degree of Master of Science, M.S. (Agr.), under the conditions 
prescribed on pages 40-42. 

Special Students. 

Attention is directed to the fact that persons of maturity who 
have had approximately two years of high school work may enter the 
College of Agriculture as special students under the provisions as set 
forth on page 32 of this catalogue. These students will be admitted 
to all elementary classes in Agriculture and will receive a thorough 
training in the practical phases of scientific Agriculture. 



The ( '"i.u.1,1: of A.GRicui/n be 

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Freshman Year — First Semester. 

ultural botany (Botany S) 8:00 T.Th., 2: mi T.Th. or\\ 
•Animal husbandry (A. Hush. 40) 

^inorganic chemistry (Chem l) 10:00 T.Th.F., 2:00 If. or T 

torlc and comp. (English D 11:00 M.w.F. 3 

English llteratnre (English 26) 11:00 T.Th. 

Military science (1) 1-':"" M. T. Th. F. 1 1* 

Freshmen Year — Second Semester. 

ulture botany (Botany 1) T.Th.. 2 : 00 T.Th. orWJ 

able gardening (Hoii I T.Th.. 8:00 T. or w 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem. 2) 10:00 T.Th.F., 1:00 If. or Th. 1 

Introduction to agriculture 10:00 If. l 

oric and comp. (English 2) 11:00 M.W.F. 3 

English literature (English 27) 11:00 T. Th. 

Military science (2) 12:00 M. T. Th. F. 1 Is 

Sophomore Year — First Semester. 

-Animal biolo (Zoology 1) 8:00 T.Th.. 2 : mi M.W.or T.Th. 4 

introductory physics (Physii 8:00 M.W.F 

Physics laboratory (Physics 2) 10:00 Th. 1 

'Elementary* pomology (Hon. 2) 10:00 If. F., 2:00 T. or F. 3 

Soil fertility Lgronomy 21) 11:00 M.F.. 2:00M.W.orT.T 

Military science (3) 12:00 M. T. Th. F. 1 

ive I or 3 19 

Sophomore Year — Second Semester. 

Introductory physics (Phys:< 8:00 M. \\\ F. 3 

Physics laboratory (Physics V) 10:00 Th. 1 

Farm Crops >nomy 2) 9:00 M. W. F. 2:00 M 4 •"" 

.Farm dairying (Dairy Husb. 21) I T. Th . 2:00 W. 

Farm poultry (Poultry Hush. 1) 10:00 If. V 3 ** 

.r.meral entomology (Ento. 1) 11:00 M.w.F.. 2:00 Th. 

Military science (1) 12:00 If. T. Th. F 1 |J 

Required Work, Junior and Senior Years — First Semester. 

■lie chemistry (Chem. 16) T. Th.. 2:00 T. or Th. I 

era] Seminar 

Principle i", i ii :00 m.w.f 

rai bacterlology(Botany 10) 11:00 T. Th.. 2:00 T. 3 9£ 

Second Semester. 

Rural economics (Farm M- I M w V 3 

Farm management (l) 3 

dnar 4:00 If. alternafc i 6J 

throughout Junior an<1 Senior year*. Total - .na. 



196 West Virginia University Catalogue 

MAJOR SUBJECTS. 

Upon registering at the beginning of the junior year each student 
will indicate to the dean the department in which he wishes to do 
major work, and will be referred to the head of that department as 
his class officer (See page 34). The curricula given below are sug- 
gestive except as regards required subjects, and may be varied by the 
class officer to meet the needs of individual students, but indicate the 
subjects which are usually advised for students desiring to take major 
work in the respective departments. 

State Teachers' Certificate. 
Students taking courses given by the Department of Education, to 
the amount of twenty hours, approved by that department, will be eligi- 
ble for state teachers' certificates. (For details see pp. 50-5.) Students 
taking ten hours will be eligible as teachers of vocational agriculture, 
but twenty hours is recommended. 

Agricultural Education. 
Students may choose as a major either general agricultural educa- 
tion or vocational agricultural education. 

Junior Year — First Semester. Junior Year — Second Semester. 

Hrs. . • Hrs. 

Sociology 1 3 *Farm management \m 3 

'^♦Botany 10 3 Education 5 3 

Education 4 " 3 Agricultural education 31 2 

/^Chemistry 16 3 Elective 10 18 

Elective 6 18 

Senior Year — First Semester. Senior Year — Second Semester. 

♦Economics 15 3 Farm management 2 3 

Education 17 3 Agricultural ed. 16 or 36 -'" 3 

Education 1, 6, 13 or 14 3 Education 2, 7 or 15 • 3 

Elective 9 18 Elective 9 18 

Agronomy. 
Students may choose as a major either crops or soils. 
Junior Year — First Semester. Junior Year — Second Semester. 

♦Economics 15 3 ♦Farm management 1 3 

♦Botany 10 3 Agronomy (elective) 5 

Agronomy (elective) 3 Botany 13 or elective 3 

♦Chemistry 16 3 Elective 7 18 

Botany 12 or Geology 2 3 

Elective 3 18 

Senior Year — First Semester. Senior Year — Second Semester. 
Agronomy (elective) 3 ♦Farm management 2 3 
Elective 15 18 Agronomy (elective) 3 
Elective 12 18 

'Required courses (see page 194) 



[] 








Z - log] 


4 




•Farm managem< at l 




■> 


Animal husbandr 




2 


V* terinarj * 








5 18 


5 


18 





The < Jolu 

Animal Husbandry. 
Junior Year — First Semester. Junior Year — Second Semester. 



•Economl 
'Chemistrj 16 

ial husbandry 42 

Animal husbandry 13 

Animal husbandry 1 | 
Elect 

Senior Year — First Semester. Senior Year — Second Semester. 

Zoolo^ 3 ♦Farm man; - 

Animal husbandry 17 2 Animal husbandi.. 3 

♦Botany 10 Animal husbandi.. 1 

Animal husbandry 1 Veterinary BClence 

tive 9 i v 

Dairy Husbandry. 

Junior Year — First Semester. Junior Year — Second Semester. 

•Economi' 3 Dairy husbandry 4 

♦Chemistry 16 3 *Farm management 1 3 

Animal husbandly 12 2 Animal husbandi 3 

Dairy husband 3 Elective 8 18 

Botany 10 3 
Elective 

Senior Year — First Semester. Senior Year — Second Semester. 

Dairy husbandry 27 3 ♦Farm management 2 3 

Agronomy 16 Animal husbandi; 

SOmy 1" 3 Veterinary BCiem 3 

Elective 9 18Elective 

Entomology. 

Junior Year — First Semester. Junior Year — Second Semester. 

•Economics i~ rm management 1 3 

♦Botany 10 3 Entomol | - 3 

Entomolos 3 Zoolog> 

Botany 12 3 Botany 13 

Horticultu 3 5 IS 

♦Chemistry 16 3 l y 

Senior Year — First Semester. Senior Year — Second Semester. 

Entomology i 3 •Farm m ent 2 3 

Zoolo. 3 Entomc! 

Elective 12 18Entom< l 

/(» 

8 l^ 






19s 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



Farm Management. 
Junior Year — First Semester. Junior Year — Second Semester. 



♦Economics 15 
♦Botany 10 

♦Chemistry 16 
Economics 5 
Elective 



3 Farm management 8 
3 *Farm management 1 
3 Farm management 4 
3 Elective 
6 18 



2 
3 
3 

10 18 



Senior Year — First Semester. Senior Year — Second Semester. 



Sociology 10 
Economics 14 
Economics 7 
Elective 



3 *Farm management 2 

2 Farm management 3 

3 Farm management 7 
10 18 Farm management 6 

Elective 



3 

o 

2 
2 
9 18 



Horticulture — Pomology. 
Junior Year — First Semester. Junior Year — Second Semester. 



♦Economics 15 
♦Chemistry 16 
Horticulture 4 
Botany 12 
Elective 



3 ♦Botany 10 

3 ♦Farm management 1 

3 Entomology 9 

3 Horticulture 5 

6 18 Elective 



3 
3 

2 
3 

7 18 



Senior Year — First Semester. 



Senior Year — Second Semester. 



Horticulture 7 
Horticulture 13 
Botany 14 
Elective 



4 ♦Farm management 2 
3 Horticulture 20 

5 Horticulture 11 

6 18 Horticulture 14 

Elective 



3 

2 
1 
3 
9 18 



Horticulture — Vegetable Gardening. 
Junior Year — First Semester. Junior Year — Second Semester. 



♦Economics 15 
♦Chemistry 16 
Horticulture 15 
Botany 12 
Elective 



3 ♦Botany 10 

3 ♦Farm management 1 

3 Entomology 9 

3 Horticulture 5 

6 lSElective 



3 
3 
2 
3 
7 18 



Senior Year — First Semester. 



Senior Year — Second Semester. 



Horticulture 6 
Horticulture 13 
Botany 14 
Elective 



2 ♦Farm management 2 

3 Horticulture 14 
5 Horticulture 11 
8 18 Horticulture 8 

Elective 



3 
3 

1 
4 
7 18 



'Required com Bet s< i pi 



3 


•Farm management l 




3 


poultry husband] 




3 


Veterinai •• l 




3 


Animal husbandi;. 




■ > 


• hre 


7 U 


i 


Lfl 





Till. ( '"i.i.i i Iqbicul/i 

Poultry Husbandry. 

Junior Year — First Semester. Junior Year — Second Semester. 

♦Economics 16 
•Botany 10 
•Chemistry 16 

Poultry husbandry 5 
Animal husbandry 13 
Elen 

Senior Year — First Semester. Senior Year — Second Semester. 

Poultry husbandry 7 3 *Farm management 2 3 

Zoology 10 3 Poultry husband: 

Elective 12 isFarm management 7 2 

Animal husbandi. 

Elective B 18 

THESIS. 

Every candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricul- 
ture will be required to prepare a thesis on a subject in some sp> 
branch of agriculture or in some other department of science applied 
to agriculture, unless excused by his class officer. The thesis must be 
based upon the student's personal work. The subject of the th< 
must be presented in writing and approved by the class officer not 
later than November first of the academic year in which the student 
is a candidate for a degree. The completed thesis must be ; 
to the class officer for his approval not later than thirty days prior to 
Commencement day. The thesis must be type w ri tten and bound 
cording to official specifications for theses, must be signed by the 
instructor in charge and the class officer and deposited in the Uni- 
ty Library before graduation. 



'Required 



200 West Virginia University Catalogue 

REQUIREMENTS FOR CANDIDATES FOR B.S. AGR. DEGREE WHO 
ALREADY HOLD THE DEGREE OF A.B. OR B.S. 

Students who have received the degree of Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science from West Virginia University or any institution 
of similar standing, may receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture upon the following conditions: 

(1) The completion of Physics 1, 2, 3, 4, Chemistry 1, 2, Botany 
1, 2, or 3, 4, and Zoology 1, or equivalent courses. 

(2) The completion of the thirty-seven hours of courses in the 
College of Agriculture required in the curriculum on page 195. 

(3) The completion of at least twenty-two hours of elective 
courses in the College of Agriculture. 

Attention is called to the fact that fifteen hours from the follow- 
ing courses may be credited toward the A.B. degree in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. (See page 71). 

Subject. Hours. 
Agricultural education 31 (History of agricul- 
tural education) 2 

Agronomy 2 (Farm crops) 4 

Soils 1 (Soil fertility) 4 

Animal husbandry 40 (Introductory animal 

husbandry) 4 

Dairy husbandry 21 (Farm dairying) 3 

Animal husbandry 42 (Feeding farm animals) 2 

Animal husbandry 43 (Breeding farm animals)- 2 

Animal husbandry 45 (Animal nutrition) 3 

Animal husbandry 46 (Genetics) 3 

Farm management 1 3 

Horticulture 2 (Elementary pomology) 3 

Horticulture 3 (Elementary vegetable gardening).- 3 

Horticulture 13 (Plant breeding) 3 

Poultry husbandry 1 (Farm poultry) 3 

The following courses are regular electives both in the College of 
Agriculture and in the College of Arts and Sciences: 

Subject. Hours. 

Entomology, all courses 18-24 

Farm management 2 (Rural economics) 3 

Education 16 (High school agriculture) 3 

Agricultural journalism 2 

Students who desire the advantage of the broader training secured 
by first taking a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, and 
who then expect to take the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agri- 
culture, may so arrange their curriculum as to enable them to take 
sufficient of the elective courses above mentioned to secure the degree 
in agriculture in one year or in one year and a summer school session 
after receiving the first degree. 



The I Jolli oe i »f Agric 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

in the following announcements the Dumber of hours in • 
after the nam*' of the course Indicates the Dumber of credit b 

Whenever possible, the .-• during which the com 

the hour, the uame of the Instructor, and the i 

at the end of the announcement ol 

is customary to designate th< of study by the nam*' ol 

departmenl and the Dumber of the particular course. Thus ?>.• 

in farm crops Ifl known DOmy 2:" the Course in rural 

nomics is known as "Farm management 2 

used are: W., Woodburn Hall; 5 In Hall: 

M. ii.. Mechanical Hall: A Agricultural Building; L.. Library; B 
Experiment station Building. 

Only the technical COUrsi I primarily for the Btudent 

agriculture arc described hen ption of 

courses listed on required ve in the agricultural 

curriculum, sec the announcement of courses in t! • 
and Sciences or other coll- 

Courses marked by an asterisk (*) may be offered for credit in 

the College of Arts and Sciences. Courses marked by a doul 

Ink are regular electivea in the college of Arts and Science 

AGRICULTURE. 
Dean CoULTOL 

1. Introduction to Agriculture. (1 Hr.) Required of all freshmen. 
Lectures by the dean, the university librarian, and members of the 
faculty, designed to indicate to new students the field of agricultural 
education, helpful methods of study, the use of the library, etc. 

"0. 

2. General Seminar. (One-half hour each semester.) Required of 
juniors and seniors in agriculture and home economic-. A U i ture 
cour Ing the general problems in agriculture and home econo- 
mics and their application to the community: the : of agri- 
cultural Bden Dl day problems ll on work, and 

turai training. 

Alternate Mondays 1:00 p. D. In charge Of Committee on Stu- 
dents' Courses and Hours. 

AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM. 

**12. Agricultural Journalism. (2 Hn 'ion 

and practice in writing articles for farm periodio«ls. in editinj 

reading, Illustrating, and in general preparation for publication; bul- 
letin writing; farm advertising; other forms of special farm writ 
PrerequU -dish l and 2 or of Instrui 

19). 

M Tii . 1:1 ; Mr - 



202 West Virginia University Catalogue 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 

Professor Winkler and Mr. Rouzer. 

•31. History of Agricultural Education. (2 His.) Elective. The 
purpose of this course is to give a better understanding and apprecia- 
tion of present day tendencies in agricultural education. The origin 
and development of the movement for agricultural education in Eu- 
rope and the United States will be considered. The effect of this move- 
ment upon education as a whole will be noted. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00. 

**16. High School Agriculture. (3 Hrs.) Required instead of 
Education 10 of seniors who desire a State Teacher's Certificate. A 
course designed for persons who expect to teach agriculture in the 
high school. The organization of courses in secondary agriculture 
with reference to classroom study and laboratory and field studies; 
preparation and discussion of lesson plans; methods of teachmg; 
observation and practice teaching. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00, T., 2:00; or hours to be arranged. 

**35. Methods in Agricultural Extension. (2 Hrs.) A consideration 
of the principles of extension teaching and the best types of organiza- 
lion for extension work. Observation and practice in extension 
methods as applied in farm demonstration work, agricultural clubs, 
and other extension activities. Discussion of the relation of the ex- 
tension division, the farm bureau, and the extension worker to othe] 
institutions and agents engaged in the improvement of country life. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00. Staff, assisted by specialists from 
the Extension Division. 

36. Vocational Agricultural Education. (3 Hrs.) Elective for 
seniors. A course for students qualifying for special teachers, direc- 
tors and supervisors of vocational agricultural education in the sec- 
ondary school, as provided for under the Smith-Hughes Act, aiming 
to indicate the methods and organization of schools and courses, 
short winter courses, and extension evening schools. Lectures, as- 
signed reading, and discussion with provision for observation and 
practice teaching, during their senior year. 

Second semester, T. Th.; 9:00, and a third hour to be arranged. 

34. Special Problems. (2 to 5 Hrs.) Elective. Open to advanced 
undergradute and graduate students. Studies in present day problems 
in agricultural education. 

First and second semesters. Hours to be arranged. Professor 
Winkler. 



Tin. I "i i.i QE OF &GRI4 I i : 

» 
AGRONOMY. 

Professor spmi'ii and Aseorlnft • 

Crops. 
*2. Farm Crops. (1 Hrs.) Required Of BOphOBlOPi ires 

and recitations on cerea] >ps and miscaiUuH 

history, production, seeding, cultivating and marketing; time and 
methods of planting and preparation Of soil. Laboratory :■ 

Second semester; at W. F., 9:00; at T. or P., 2:00; 

Btkmple. Ais.. given in th' 1 Bummer School. 

10. Forage Crops. (3 Hrs.) Elective. This course is a continuation 
of th«- work given on forage crops in com-. borough BtUdj 

made of all the important grasses and clovers that can be grown for 
meadow and pasture purposes. Lectures and recitations IV 

quislte: Agronomy 2. 

Second i : T. Th., 8:00; w. 8:00; Professor Bissau. 

13. Corn. (2 Hrs.) Advanced study in corn production, seeding, 
cultivation, uses, marketing and reviews of recent experiment station 
work on this crop. Laboratory and field studies of market 
varieties, ear-to-row testing, and other methods of Improvement Pre- 
requisite: Agronomy 2. 

First semester; M., 11:00. Th.. 2:1 

14. Small Grains. (2 Hrs.) Advanced study of culf: ting, 
testing, storing and marketing of grains. Review and criticism of 
recent experiment station literature. Laboratory study of mar 
grades and laboratory and field study of varieties. Prerequisite: 

Qomy 2. 

First B< If., 1" :00, Th.. 2:00. 

15. Field Crop Improvement. (?> Hrs.) Study of principles in- 
volved and method used in the improvement of field crop* with lab- 
oratory and field practice in hybridization, selection, plain in - 
geners, and other work dealing with station crop improvement. I 
requisite: Agronomy 2. i". i::. 1 1. 

First semester; T. Th.. 11:00, T 

8. Field Experimentation. (3 Hit I Experiment Station methods 
Of Invest i gation, laying OUt plots, maintenance of fertility and uniform- 
ity; planting and harvesting; k< . and Interpretation of 

.Milts. Prerequisite: Agronomy If, and 

T. Th.. 11:00; w ,., , \. 

I 



204 West Virginia University Catalogue 

12. Research in Farm Crops. For advanced undergraduate and 
graduate students. Prerequisite: permission of class officer. 

Second semester and summer; hours and credit to be arranged; 
Professor Stkmple. 

9. Thesis. (1 or 2 Hrs.) Students who intend to do thesis work 
in agronomy must arrange their problems before the close of their 
junior year so that field work can be arranged. 

First and second semester and summer; hours to be arranged. 

1. Plant Industry Seminar. (1 Hr.) Required of seniors and 
graduate students in agronomy and open to juniors; a joint seminar 
of the departments of agronomy and horticulture. 

First and second semester; hours to be arranged. Agronomy 
staff. 



Soils. 



*21. Soil Fertility. (4 Hrs.) Required of sophomores. Lectures 
on the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils with ref- 
erence to their crop producing power. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00; refund of $2.50 less breakage. 

First semester; M. F., 11:00, M. W., 2:00 or T. Th., 2:00; Associate 
Professor Salter. 

23. Soil Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) Elective. Lectures and laboratory 
work on soil chemistry. The laboratory work will include a complete 
inorganic analysis of a soil for all the elements contained in it. Col- 
orimetric determinations will be made of the compounds in the soil 
solution. Prerequisite: Soils 1 and 2. Laboratory fee, $5.00; refund 
of $2.50 less breakage. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor Salter. 

24. Soil Bacteriology. (3 Hrs.) Elective. Lecture and laboratory 
work on bacteria in soils. Prerequisite: Soils 1, 2 and 3. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00; refund of $2.50 less breakage. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor 
Salter. 

25. Soil Physics. (3 Hrs.) Elective. Lectures and laboratory 
work on the relation between the physical properties of soils and 
their productivity. A mechanical analysis of a soil will be made by 
means of the centrifuge. Prerequisite: Soils 1. Laboratory fee, $5.00; 
refund of $2.50 less breakage. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor Salter. 



The College op Agrici l/ture 






26. Advanced Soil Fertility. (2 Hi.- Led A p- 

• rial work which has been an<l Ifl DOH 
ducted on some of the more important BOi] problemfl. I': 

Soil 1. 

Second semester; T. Th . * i'rofessor E 

27. Soil Literature. (1 Ilr.) < >pen to BenlOTI and 

dents. Designed to familiarize the studen- irees of information 

and current soil literature 

Fir- r; hours to be arranged; \ Pro 

fessor Sai ii k. 

28. Plant Analysis. CI Hrs.) Elective. Lecture! and \ 

work on the methods of analysis of plants and plant products, of in- 
terest to anyone whoso major is soils, animal industry, agronomy or 
horticulture. Prerequisite: Soils _' Laboratory fee, $5.00; refund of 
• 

Fir r; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor Saltb 
and Mr. 

29. Research in Soils. < >pen to seniors and grads 
given in proportion to work done, not to exceed three hours). 

Summrr or either semester; A ssoci ate Prof ltd. 

Rural Engineering. 

4. Farm Machinery. (3 Hrs.) A detailed siudy of the 

tion. assembling and testing, and euro of farm maehir. 
>nd semester; T. Th., 11:00. M. p 1:00; Mr. 

5. Farm Engineering. (?, His.) I. md recitations on the 
detailed study of farm power, water power, and drain >ms. 

Second r; M P., 11 :00 T. 2:00; Mr. 

6. Farm Structures. (2 Hrs.) I. 

materials used, planning, construction, and relative cost of farm builc- 
nd other farm structi: 
Second semester; W . 11:00, Th., 2:00: Mr 



206 West Virginia University Catalogue 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

Professor Sheets and Assistant Professor Yoke. 

♦40. Introductory Animal Husbandry. (4 His.) Required of 
freshmen. For students desiring foundation training in animal hus- 
bandry, whether as preparation for advanced courses of study or for 
a general knowledge of live stock. History of the leading breeds; 
market classes and grades of live stock. Assigned readings, lectures 
and quizzes. 

First semester; M. W. F., 9:00 or 11:00, W. or F., 2:00; Assistant 
Professor Yoke. 

Also given in Summer School. 

*42. Feeding Farm Animals. (2 Hrs.) Elective. Classification, 
digestibility and functions of food nutrients; market grades and food 
values of feeding stuffs; feeding standards and calculations of bal- 
anced rations; adaptability of different feeds; identifying feeds and 
mixing rations and feeding farm animals. Assigned readings, lec- 
tures, and quizzes. Prerequisite: Animal husbandry 40. 

First semester; T. Th., 11:00. 

Also given in Summer School. 

*43. Breeding Farm Animals. (2 Hrs.) Elective. Evolution of 
domestic animals; history of their systematic breeding and improve- 
ment; unit characters; the range of variability; the effects of grad- 
ing and crossing; and systems of breeding. Lectures, assigned read- 
ings, and quizzes. Prerequisite: Animal husbandry 40. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:00; Assistant Professor Yoke. 

Also given in Summer School. 

44. Advanced Stock Judging. (3 Hrs.) Elective. Judging breeding 
and fat classes of livestock with reference to market and showyard 
requirements. Students taking this course will be required to par- 
ticipate in a tour of inspection of representative herds, flocks and 
studs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

First semester; M., 10:00, M., 2:00; S., 8:00; Assistant Professor 
Yoke 

*45. Animal Nutrition. (3 Hrs.) Elective. Composition and fuel 
value of feeding stuffs; digestion, absorption and metabolism of food 
nutrients; elimination of metabolic products; coefficients of digesti- 
bility and nutritive value of feeding stuffs. Prerequisite: Animal 
husbandry 42 and Chemistry 16. 

Second semester; M. F., 9:00; M., 2:00; Professor Sheets. 



The Cou ege of Agru i ur\ 

♦46. Genetics. (8 His.) Heredity; variation: bfendel'i and 
ton's laws; dominance and i on; gametic coupling; com 

mutation theory; inheritance of acquired characi I Influ- 

ences; pure lines; selection, variability, modification <>t anil 

Practical application to breeding. LOGt 

BQuiaite: Animal husbandry IS or equiTalent course, Laborai 

fee, $1.00. 

Second semester; M. P., 10:00, W., 
I 

47. Herd and Flock Book Study. (2 Hrs.) EH( 
study of the most noted flocks and herds at home and abroad with 

■ view to becoming acquainted with the pedigree ol the leading bl 

lines and families of the different breeds Oi livestock. 1 

Animal husbandry 10, 42. 43. 

First and second n and Summer School; hours to b- 

ranged; Mr. 

49. Research. (2 to 5 Hrs.i Elective. Intended primaril 
advanced undergraduates and for graduate students who desire to do 
research along one or more of the following lines: (a) Nutrition. 
(b) Breeding, (c) Systems of livestock farming, (d) Advanced his- 
tory of breeds of livestock, (e) Judging, (f) Meats, i lite: 
Permission from head of department. 

First and second Bemesters and Summer School; hours to tx 
ranged; Animal husbandry staff. 

50. Animal Industry Seminar. (1 Hi.) Required of junior- 
niors, and graduate students whose major is animal husbandry. 
pers will be prepared and read by the members. 

First and second semesters; If.. 4:80; Animal husbandry staff. 

51. Thesis. (Credit in proportion to work done). First end 
ond semester and Summer School. 

Hours to be arranged; Animal husbandry staff 

52. Summer Practice. (1 Hr.) One hour credit will be 
satisfactory reports, made in prescribed form, upon summer work 
done upon an approved livestock or dairy farm, 01 

quest to do summer work must be made upon forms provided, not 
r than July 1st.) 
Professor Sin 

60. Beef Production. (?, His.) Elective Hlstorj 

beef type from | the butcher. tie 

breeder; market classes and trades; equipm. • and man- 

agement; combined beef and milk production; wintering and g 



208 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Ing; finishing for market. Lectures, assigned readings, quizzes, and 
judging. Prerequisite: Animal husbandry 40. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; 'F., 2:00; Professor Sheets. 

61. Horse and Mule Production. (3 Hrs.) Elective. History of 
breeds, with a critical study of their type, characteristics and adapta- 
bility; equipment and methods of breeding and management; care 
of mares, stallions, jacks, and foals under farm conditions. Lectures, 
assigned readings, quizzes, and judging. Prerequisite: Animal hus- 
bandry 40. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; F., 2:00; Assistant Professor 
Yoke. 

62. Mutton and Wool Production. (3 Hrs.) Elective. Breeds used 
for mutton and for wool production; type, characteristics, and adapt- 
ability; market classes and grades of sheep and wool; sheep breed- 
ing as applied to pure bred and grade flocks; feeding, housing and 
shepherding; factors affecting the quantity, quality, strength and 
condition of wool and health of the animals. Lectures, assigned read- 
ings, quizzes and judging. Prerequisite: Animal husbandry 40. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00; Th., 2:00; Assistant Professor 
Yoke. 

63. Pork Production. (3 Hrs.) Elective. History of breeds; 
breeds with respect to type, characteristics, and adaptability; market 
classes; swine raising from the standpoint of economic production; 
breeding, housing, care and feeding of swine. Lectures, assigned 
readings, quizzes and judging. Prerequisite: Animal husbandry 40. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00; T., 2:00. 

64. Meat. ( Hrs.) Elective. Farm butchering, curing and care 
of meats; yield, quality, and value of meat and by-products as re- 
lated to breeding, feeding, and health of animals; classes, grades and 
cuts of meat recognized in wholesale and retail markets. Prerequi- 
site: Animal husbandry 40. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:00; S., 8:30. 



Tin: ( <>i i.i QE OF AOBICI L/CT UK 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY. 

*21. Farm Dairying. (3 Hra.) Required of sophomon 
readings, lectorei and quisles. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 
Second semester; T. Th.. 9:00 or 10:00. W. or F - 
Also given in Bummer School. 

23. Milk Production. (1 His ) Kb-cii. Iflth 

the economical production of milk and with the most approved d 
ods of handling the dairy herd. Lectun gned readings, quia 

and Judging. Prerequisite: hairy husbandry 
Second semester; If. w. P., 8:00, If.. 2:00. 

24. Pure Bred Dairy Cattle. (1 llr.) Elective. Th: deals 

with the study of the different dairy herd hooks; s stud] b of 

the dairy breeds with special attention to different families and pt 
Prerequisite: Hairy husbandry 21 
• and second semesters; hours to be arrant 

27. Market Milk. (2 His.) Elective Lectun Lings, 
and quizzes. Prerequisite: Hairy husbandry - 

Fis s( ter; w. v . 1:00. 

28. Cheese Making, (2 Bib.) Elective. Prerequisite: Dairy hus- 
bandry 21. Laboratory fee $2; refund $1 less bn 

Second semester: one class period and one laboratory period. 
Hours to be arran- 

30. Dairy Manufactures. (3 Hrs.) Elective. Butter making, con- 
densed milk. Ice cream, etc I. and quim 

Prerequisite: Hairy husbandry 21. Laboratory fee. I .. ind 

$1.00 less breaa 

First Bemester; T. Th.. 8:00; Th., 2 

31. Creamery and Cheese Factory Management. (2 llr>.) 

Lectun nd quizzes. Prerequisite: Hairy hus- 

bandry 2S and 30 

Second •; hours ranged. 

34. Research. (1 or 2 H: Special problems in 

line Of dairy husbandry may be tak»-n in this coir 
the student. 

First and Becond rs; hour- to be arrange 

35. Summer Practice. (1 llr.) Credit amount hour 

will be given for made in prescribed form a] 

Bummer work don.' on an Improved dairy farm, or in creamer] 

factory or market milk plant. 

made upon form- provided, not later than July 1. and . 

mitted by October 1.) 



210 West Virginia University Catalogue 

ENTOMOLOGY. 
Professor Peairs. 

**1. General Entomology. (4 Hrs.) Required of sophomores. 
Laboratory and field work in collecting and mounting the more com- 
mon local insects; classification of the insects collected; dissections 
and drawings of the external anatomy of various types. Text: Coni- 
stock's Manual for the Study of Insects. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 11:00. Th., 2:00. 

Also given in Summer School. 

**2. Economic Entomology. (2 Hrs.) Elective in the College of 
Agriculture and the College of Arts and Sciences. A general con- 
sideration of insect forms which directly affect the welfare of man 
and a discussion of methods of insect control. Prerequisite: Entomo- 
logy 1. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00. 

**9. Horticultural Entomology. (2 Hrs.) Lectures and field obser- 
vations on insects affecting fruit and vegetable crops with special 
consideration of control measures applicable to such forms. Prere- 
quisite: Entomology 1. 

Second semester; T. Th., 11:00. 

**3. Advanced General Entomology. (3 Hrs.) Elective. Origin 
and developmnt of insects; special structures, coloration, adapta- 
tions, structural and otherwise, internal anatomy. Lectures, assigned 
reference work and laboratory. Prerequisite: Zoology 1. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

**4. Systematic Entomology. (Credit in proportion to work done, 
not to exceed 3 hours a semester.) A continuation of the work in 
classification begun in Course 1. Detailed studies of certain groups. 

Either semester or Summer School; hours to be arranged. 

**5. Research Entomology. (Credit in proportion to work done, 
not to exceed 3 hours a semester.) For students wishing to make 
entomology their major. Prerequisite: Entomology 3. 

Either semester or Summer School; hours to be arranged. 

**6. Insects and Disease. (1 Hr.) Lectures on the more common 
insects known to be, or suspected of being, responsible for the trans- 
mission of diseases of man and the higher animals. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

8. Thesis. (1 or 2 Hrs.) 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. 



FARM MANAGEMENT. 

•1. Farm Management. (3 Hri of junior 

equipping and operating ■ farm; typei of farmintr; rental system; 

farm labor; cost production; successful marketing; farm records 

accounts, etc. Field trips during th< 

requisite: Agronomy 2, Soil- 
Second semester; If. w. F.. 9:00. 

**2. Rural Economics. (3 Hrs.) Required 
to graduate students. The study of economics as related to all ph 
of rural life. Prerequisite: Economic! 15. 

Second semester; M. W. F.. S:00. 

3. Advanced Farm Management. (2 or Z Hrs> Open T 

and graduate students. A continuation of Farm managempnt 1 in the 
further study of farm operations and cost of production. Prerequi- 
site: Farm management 1. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

4. History of Agriculture. (3 Hrs.) Elective. The hist..: 
agriculture beginning with ancient references through all the stages 
of its development; early agricultural experiment stations and thHr 
work; the West Virginia Station; the United States Department of 
Agriculture. 

Second semester; II. W. P., 10:00. 

6. Thesis. (1 or 2 Hrs.) 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged. 

7. Marketing Agricultural Products. (2 Hrs.) Fleetive. A study 
of produce exchanges, methods of transportation, and muni, 
markets. Attention will be sriven to co-operation as a means for b- 
marketing. 

md semester; T. Th.. 8:00. 

8. Farm Records and Accounts. (2 Hrs) Open to Jim 
seniors. A ctudy of farm inventories, records and cost accounts from 
actual farm records. 

Second semester; T. livno; t. 2 



212 West Virginia University Cataijogue 

horticulture. 

Professor Alderman, Asscoiate Professor Jones, Assistant Professor 
Richey and Mr. Crane. 

Pomology. 

*2. Elementary Pomology. (3 Hrs.) Required of sophomores. A 
general course covering the propagation of our common fruits and the 
planting and management of orchards. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
First semester; M. F., 10:00, T. W. or F., 2:00 
Also given in the Summer School in alternate years. 

4. Systematic Pomology. (3 Hrs.) Elective. The history, botany, 
and classification of fruits and their adaptation to West Virginia con- 
ditions. Prerequisite: Horticulture 2. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:0>0, Th., 2:00; Professor Alderman. 

5. Small Fruits. (3 Hrs.) Elective. Care and management of 
small fruit plantations; varieties and their adaptation to West Vir- 
ginia soils and climate; paking and marketing; study of experimen- 
tal plots and varieties under test. Prerequisite: Horticulture 2 and 3. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00, Th., 2:00; Assistant Professor 
Richey. 



7. Commercial Fruit Growing. (4 Hrs.) Open to seniors and 
graduate students. An advanced course covering the study of com- 
mercial orchards in West Virginia. Prerequisite: Horticulture 2. 

First semester; M. W. F., 9:00, S., 8:30. 

9. Advanced Practical Pomology. (1 Hr.) A trip occupying one 
week's time will be made through the fruit regions of Eastern West 
Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. The cost will not exceed thirty 
dollars. Prerequisite: Horticulture 2. 

First semester; Professor Alderman. 

16. Fruit Judging. (1 Hr.) A course in fruit judging designed 
to train men for fruit juding teams and practical judging. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.50. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Alderman. 

18. Advanced Fruit Judging. (1 Hr.) A continuation of Horticul- 
ture 16. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Alderman. 



THE I lOLMBGE OF AGRIC1 i/n RE 

Olericulture. 

*3. Elementary Vegetable Gardening. (3 Mrs.) Required Of : 
men. Kadi student will be required to plan, plant and care for a 
garden 20x40 feet in area. Laboratory fee, $2.00; refund of |1 
breakage. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00, T.. 2:00; a 
Jones. 

8. Commercial Vegetable Gardening. (1 Hrs .) Designed fOI stu- 
dents who wish to take up practical market gardening work. 
tory exercises in the University market garden, visits to some I 

markets and commercial plants. Prerequisite: Horticulture 3. 

Second semester; Iff. \v. F.. 10:00, F.. 2:00; a 
Jones. 

6. Greenhouse Construction. (2 His.) Elective. I.»-ctur»s and 
discussions upon modern greenhouse construction. Heating, v»-ntda- 
tion. and adaptation of various types of bouses to special ciop.- 
conditions. Leboratory work in drafting, designing and erecting preen- 
hous- 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; Associate Professor Jones. 

15. Greenhouse Management. (3 His.) Elective. A study ol 
principal flower, fruit and vegetable crops that are grown under gl 
Laboratory exercises will include practical work in the college green- 
houses. 

First semester; Iff. W., 9:00; W., 2:00; Associate Professor Jon 

14. Rural Landscape Gardening. (3 Hrs. i Elective. I), 
train leaders in rural betterment. A Study of th.- principles of land- 
scape gardening and civic art in their applications to the improve- 
ment of rural communities; the organization and direction of i 
munity activi' 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00, and Iff., 2 90; A- 
Jones. 

General Courses. 
*13. Plant Breeding. (3 Hrs.) Required of Benton 

in horticulture, open also to graduate students. The principle! 
variation and heredity, together with theorfc oration and th< 

practical application to problems of plant bn-.-di;. 

♦ 'tics in agriculture and horticulture; problem work in biometry. I 

requisite: Botany 8 and 4. 

First semester; Iff. w. p.. U:00; Pi u and a 

ant Professor Ricm r. 



214 West Virginia University Catai/Ogue 

19. Plant Breeding Practice. (1 Hr.) Open to seniors and grad- 
uate students. Prerequisite: Horticulture 13. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Alderman. 

11. Plant Industry Seminar. (1 Hr.) Required of seniors and 
graduate students in horticulture and open to juniors. A joint semi- 
nar of the departments of Agronomy and Horticulture. Papers by 
members of the class upon subjects pertaining to their research or 
thesis work, or upon special problems. Discussion of special topics 
by members of the faculty. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Alderman and 
staff. 

10. Thesis. (1 or 2 Hrs.) For seniors and graduate students. 
Students should arrange their problem before the close of their junior 
year so that materials may be on hand and no delay be necessary in 
the following year. 

First and second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Alderman. 

12. Horticultural Research. (1 or 2 Hrs. a semester.) Open to 
undergraduate and graduate students specializing in horticulture. 
Original problems will be investigated and a detailed report of the 
work done will be submitted. 

First and second semesters and summer; hours to be arranged; 
Professor Alderman. 

20. Experimental Methods in Horticulture. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
seniors and graduate students. A study of the origin, development, 
and growth of horticultural research. A review of recent horticultural 
investigations and practice in outlining projects and the taking of 
records are required. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Alderman. 

17. Summer Practice. (1 Hr.) Open to juniors and seniors. One 
hour credit will be given for satisfactory reports made by students 
who spend the summer upon an approved fruit or truck farm. Appli- 
cation for credit must be by July 1st and a report submitted by 
October 1st. 

Professor Alderman or Associate Professor Jones. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

Professor Giddings. 

1. Experimental Plant Pathology. (2 to 5 Hrs.) Elective. In- 
tended primarily for undergraduate and graduate students in agron- 
omy and horticulture. 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. 



Tin: Colli i koucuLn 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY. 

Associate Preh s>«>r Ammiiw- 

*1. Farm Poultry. (3 Hrs.) Required of sophomore 
breeds and varieties of poultry; the poultry house ami Its equipn* 
batching and rearing chirks, ears and management of l! 
inc poultry and poultry products; the most common poultry d 
their prevention and treatment Laboratory fee, >' 

Second semester; II. P., II 

5. Housing and Feeding. (3 Hrs.) Elective tor Junior* Lei 

on the various types of poultry houses, their location, con- 
and equipment; feeds and feeding; practice in constructing and re- 
modeling houses and equipment, and market rations. 
First semester; hours to be arrant 

6. Incubation, Brooding and Rearing. (2 Hrs.) Elective for jun- 
iors. Lectures on the fundamental principles involved in natural 
incubation and brooding; care and management of chicks; construc- 
tion and operation of incubators and brood- 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

7. Breeds and Breeding. (3 Hrs.) Elective for juni arcs 
on the different classes, breeds and varieties, their oricin. history, 
and classification; breeding for standard and utility; practice in 
judging poultry, selection and mating of flock. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

8. Marketing. (2 His.) Elective for juniors. Lectures on DDJU 
ing poultry and poultry products; anatomy of the fowl and the I 
sanitation; prevention and treatment of parasites and diseases. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

9. Poultry Diseases. (1 Hr) Elective. Fractiee in caring for a 
pen of laying fowls with records of cost of production; study of poul- 
try diseases. The course may be taken at any time in connection with 
the above courses. 

Either semester; hours to be arrar 

10. Research. (1 to 3 Hrs.) Elective for seniors. A study of 
methods of investigation together with the working out of some I 
inal problems. 

Either semester; hours to be arranged. 



216 West Virginia University Catalogue 

VETERINARY SCIENCE. 
Associate Professor Luedbb. 

1. Anatomy and Physiology. (3 Hrs.) Elective. A systematic 
description of the bones, muscles, viscera, vascular, lymphatic and 
respiratory systems. The structure of the ox, sheep, and pig, as con- 
trasted and compared with that of the horse. The functions of the 
various organs and tissues of the body, the chemical constitution and 
physical laws which affect growth, reproduction and development. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; laboratory, T., 2:00. 

2. Diseases of Farm Animals and Materia Medica. (3 Hrs.) Elec- 
tive. A study of the important diseases of all domestic animals, 
method of treatment and drugs for their cure. Prerequisite: Veter- 
inary science 1. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00, Th., 2:00. 

3. Veterinary Science. (3 Hrs.) Elective. A comparative study 
of the structures and functions of the different organs of the horse, 
ox, sheep and pig; cause, prevention, symptoms and first aid treat- 
ment of diseases of these animals. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00, laboratory hours to be arranged. 

4. The Horse. (2 Hrs.) Elective. A study of the most success- 
ful methods of handling stallions, jacks and brood mares, care of the 
foal, growing and developing young horses for market and the me- 
chanics of the horse. Prerequisite: Animal husbandry 40 and 43. 

Second semester; F., 11:00, 2:00. 

5. Parasites of Farm Animals. (2 Hrs.) Elective. Lectures and 
text book study. Classification, life history and identification of the 
parasites of domestic animals; prevention of infection, symptoms and 
treatment of the animals; methods of control of the parasites. Pre- 
requisite: Entomology or Zoology 1, and Veterinary science 1. 

Second semester; F., 10:00, and laboratory hours to be arranged. 



Thk ( lOLLEGE >F AOBICULTl 

III. INSTRUCTION IN HOME ECONOMK 

ORGANIZATION. 

For purposes of administration ihe departnu 

the College of Agriculture. The work involves thn 

1. In the College of Agriculture a pi i urriculu: 

lined whereby students m :*-\r major either general h 

nomlca In pn 
ace in H 
:■ . - 

degree of Bache! a major 

must meet the requirement- for the 
collef 69). The ].• rtment of ho: 

acts as class officer for such Btudei 

3. Extension work in home economics is given under the : 
tion of t ; ment of Agricultural Extension (p - 

AIM AND SCOPE. 

The course leading to the desree of Bachelor o: - 
economics is planned for women students and especially for tl 
who wish to teach home economics in vocational schools and other 
institutions or to learn the business of home keeping. The aim of th* 
course is to give women such training as will best prepare then 
assume their responsibilities as members of a household and a < 
munity. This training includes: first, a knowledge of those - 
which are fundamental to an understanding of the principles of home 
economics; second, technical courses in food, shelter, and 
which will enable the student to establish standards of living: thi: 
general knowledge of the law of production and consump'ion ohtail 
from courses in industrial b « ial history, and econom 

fourth, courses in oral and written English and in English literati 
To provide for this training a curriculum is prescribed 8uffl< 
ele( -" : permit the e o qualify for r< 

tional home » b, or to take speci 

• which she is in'' 

EQUIPMENT. 

The department occupies two floors of the wine of Oslebay Hall. 
On the first floor are two larse well equ:; i labor:,- 

suite of : _ room an( j kitchen and reception 

room, a textile laboratory, a n om, and the of fit . 

partment. On the second floor there are three text ries 

equipped with sewine machines and electric motor attachment 
floor a 1 



218 West Virginia University CataIjOGue 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

For admission to the College of Agriculture for the course lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, the 
candidate must have credit for fifteen units obtained by examination 
or on certificate from a duly accredited secondary school. Of the 
fifteen units which must be offered for admission, nine units are de- 
finitely prescribed as follows: 

1. English: Students are admitted to English 1 on completion of 
a four-year high school course in English, or its equivalent, and re- 
ceive credit for three or four units, as the instructor and the work 
done and certified justify. 

2. Foreign Language: Two units of one language are required. 

3. Mathematics: One unit of algebra and one of plane geometry 
are required. 

4. History: One unit is required. 

5. Science: One unit is required of either physics, chemistry, 
botany, zoology, or biology. 

6. Elective: Enough from the following list to complete 15 
units : 

French 1 to 3 units 

German 1 to 3 " 

Latin 1 to 4 

Greek 1 to 3 

Mathematics \ to 1 " 

Science 1 to 3 

Social science (including history, civics 

and economics) 1 to 4 

Vocational subjects (including agricul- 
ture, commercial subjects, household 
arts, and manual training) 1 to 3 

Drawing (free hand and mechanical) 1 to 2 

Prospective students are urged to take free hand drawing if it 
can be secured in the secondary school. 

For details of work required for each unit see pages 57-64. 



The 1 "i i.i go i if Agricul/i i 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

Credits Required. 

Th< of Bachelor of Science In Home Economic* will bt 

conferred upon any student who Satisfies the above entrance require- 
ments and offers one hundred and twenty-eight hom f<^r col- 
lege courses including a satisfactory theei 

The "semester hour" Is the standard of computing the amour 

of work required for graduation The ••hour" represent! the amount 
of work done in one semester (eighteen Week8) and in one recitation 
hour with two preparation hOUTfl a week, or in three hours prac 
or laboratory work requiring no ontsid< ration. No Student 

permitted to register for less than fourteen hours or more than seven- 
teen hours of work in any one seme 

Required and Elective Courses. 

Of the one hundred and twenty-eight hours credit required for the 
degree eighty-nine hours are definitely prescribed as indicated in 
the curriculum which follows. The remaining thirty-nine hours' credit 
must be elected from such courses as may be prescribed by the el 
officer. The required and the elective courses in the subject of 
home economics must amount to not fewer than forty hours in all. 

To qualify for the vocational home economics certificate, the 
student must take the following courses in addition to those listed in 
the curriculum: 

Home Economics 50. 51. 52. 36 and 37. 

Education 4, 5, 10 and 22. 

Elective courses in education, 3 hours. 

For students interested in rural life the following courses an 
recommended: Home economics 50; Horticulture 2 and 3: Poultry 
husbandly 1: Dairy husbandry 21. 

Class Officer. 

The head of the department of home economic! will ac: as class 
officer. 

All students who wish to enter the university for the purpc 
taking home economics should confer with the head of the depart- 
ment before registering. 



220 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Thesis. 

Each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics will be required to prepare a thesis on some subject re- 
lated to the work in home economics. The thesis will be based upon 
the student's personal work. The subject of the thesis must be pre- 
sented in writing to the head of the home economics department by 
the first of November of the academic year in which the student 
is a candidate for a degree. The completed thesis must be presented 
for approval not later than thirty days prior to commencement day. 

Classification of Students. 

To be classified as a conditioned freshman a student must have 
credit for at least thirteen units of entrance requirements; to be 
classified as a regular freshman she must have fulfilled all entrance 
reqirements. To be classified as a sophomore she must have credit 
for twenty-five hours of college work; as a junior, fifty-eight hours; 
as a senior, ninety-two hours. 

Admission with Advanced Standing. 

Students from other institutions will be given credit for work 
already done in accordance with the general rules for advanced stand- 
ing (See page 32), but at least one year of resident work will be 
required for the baccalaureate degree in home economics. 

Special Students. 

Persons who do not desire to become candidates for degrees may, 
by the permission of the committee on classification and grades, be 
admitted as special students, subject to the provisions set forth on 
page 32. 



The I <'i i.i. <,i. of Agrici lture 

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF B.S.H E. 

Freshman Year — First Semester. Hi 

Rhetoric and comp. (English I) v :00 M W l 
English literature (English 86) T Th. 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem l) 9:0<' m. W, f 

ration of food (H. E I I T Th.. 10-12 T Th. 

or Preparation ol rood (HJC.31) i:00 T. Th.. %~4 \v. 

Il8h history (History 19) 11:00 If. \\ V. 8 16 

Freshman Year — Second Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (English 2) " If. W. i" 3 

English Literature (English 27) 8:00 T. Th. 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem. 2) 9:ou if. \v. F. t 

Preparation of food (H. B. L 1 1 I T. Th.. 10-12 T. Th. 1 

or Preparation of food (H.E T Th.. 2-4 \v. 3 

American history (History 29) 11:00 M W. P\ 3 16 Of 15 

Sophomore Year — First Semester. 

Agricultural botany (Botany ::> 8:00 T. Th.. 2:00 W. V. 4 

Applied design (H. E. 11) 9:00 T. Th.. 10-12 T. Th. 1 

Principles of study (Educ. 17) 10:00 M. \Y I\ 

Elect ivos 5 1% 

Sophomore Year — Second Semester. 

Sewing (H. E 14) 8:00-10:00 M. w . 

Agricultural botany (Botany 4) 8:00 T. Th. 2:00 T. Th. 1 

Psychology of teaching (Ed. 12) 10:00 M. W.*P. 

Elective* k in 

Junior Year — First Semester. 

hemistry (Chem. 16) 9:00 T. Th.. 2:00 T. Th. 3 

Diet* (H. E. 24) 10:00-12:00 T.. 10:00 Th. 

Home cookery (H. E. 21) 11:00 Th.. 2:"" V. 

lOgy 10:00 if. p. 

Elect ives 

Junior Year — Second Semester. 

ene and sanitation (Bac. 5) S:00 T. Th. ) 

10:00 12 00 M ' : S 

10:00 T. Th. 

I T Th. 2 

11 :<". T. Th. 2:00 T. Th. :: 



Home planning 


(H. E 18) 


ene 


MI. E. 9) 


<>logy 8 




lint any in 




Eleol 






Senior Year 




(H. i: 1%) 


Housewil i 












•First Semester. 



11 :00 oi i - x Th. 

11 16 

Senior Year — Second Semester. 

(H E 52) 11:00 T. Th. 
tics (H 

Elective* n j r< 



222 West Virginia University Catalogue 

COURSES IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

Associate Professor ft. H. Colwell, Miss Reiley, Miss Gill, Miss 
Schmidt and Miss Schultz. 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who select home 
economics as their major are required to take courses 1 and 2 or 31 
and 32, 21, 24, in the food group, courses 9 and 14 in the house and 
family group, and courses 43 or 13, 11, and 44 in the clothing and 
textiles group. Students who are preparing to teach home economics 
must also take courses 26 and 27. 

Chemistry 1 and 2 are prerequisite or parallel courses for all 
courses in home economics except 43 and 13. Courses 25, 26, 36, 37, 
18, 16, 17, 8, 12, 51 and 52 are not open to students who do not elect 
either botany or zoology. 

Foods. 

1. Selection and Preparation of Food. (4 Hrs.) A study of the 
chemical composition, relative physiological and economic value of 
the animal foods and their products; processes in the production of 
raw food material. It is recommended that Chemistry 1 and 2 pre- 
cede or parallel this course. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; laboratory sections (limited to 
twenty students each), for students in College of Agriculture^ T. Th., 
10:00-12:00; for advanced students, M. W., 2:00; other sections, T. Th., 
2:00; Associate Professor Colwell and Miss Schmidt, 2 W. 

2. Selection and Preparation of Food. (4 Hrs.) Continuation of 
course 1. A study of the chemical composition and relative physio- 
logical and economic value of the vegetable foods and their products; 
processes in the production of raw food material; principles of diet. 
Prerequisite: Same as in course 1. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; laboratory sections (limited to 
twenty students each), for students in College of Agriculture, T. Th., 
10:00-12:00; for advanced students, M. W., 2:00; other sections, T, Th., 
2:00; Associate Professor Colwell and Miss Schmidt, 2 W. 

31. Selection and Preparation of Food. (3 Hrs.) Similar to course 

1. For students who offer cooking for entrance. Laboratory fee, 
$1.50. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; laboratory section, M., 2:00; Asso- 
ciate Professor Colwell and Miss Schmidt, 2 W. 

32. Selection and Preparation of Food. (3 Hrs.) Similar to course 

2. For students who offer cooking for entrance. Laboratory fee, 
$1.50. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; laboratory section, F„ 2:00; Asso- 
ciate Professor Colwell and Miss Schmidt, 2 W. 



Tin: I '"i.i.i.'.i. OF Agkicili 

21. Home Cookery. (3 HTS.) 

amounts; coal c value "i food combinations 

for the .statistical family for breakfast, lunch. -on Of iOPPOT, and 

ner. Prerequisite: Home eoonomlca l and - i 

Fir^ •: laboratory, 8:08 te I 

Schmidt . I W. 

20. Home Cookery. (2 Hrs.) Continual loi 
requisite: Saint- as in course 21. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Second semester: laboratory, T. Th . I Dum I W. 

22. Demonstrations. (2 His.) This coins. • Include* ■ stu d 
how to select and how to present the subject of foods tx 
zations i of rural people. Prerequisite: Home economi. 
and 2. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

First semester; T. Th., 4:00; Associate Professor COLWETA, 32 W 

23. Demonstrations. (2 His.) Continuation of COB 
requisite: Home economics 1 and 2. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

Second semester: T. Th.. 4:00; Associate Pi I W. 

24. Elementary Dietetics. (2 His.) A study of the fuel value of 
foods; the relation of the different foodstuffs to the fuel value and to 
the cost of foods, the food requirement of the normal adult and 

Prerequisite: Home economics 1 and 2. Parallel course. Home 
economics 21. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:<X Associate Professor Coi \w i i . 

25. Dietetics, (o Hrs.) A study of digestion, absorption, assimila- 
tion of the foodstuffs; amounts of food required for the nutrition of 
the normal adult at rest and at work; diet for infancy, youth, 
age; special diets; cost of family dietaries. Prerequisite: Cbem 

16, Home economics 1. 2. 21. 24. 

Second KmeBter; M. W. F.. li>:0<>: A iate Professor COL* 

9 W. 



Textiles and Clothing. 

11. Applied Design. (4 His.) The principles covernin.: 
of line and color are directly applied to home furnish i: 
and raffia basketry, and to original designs developed from nature 
study. Application of designs to book covers; to stencil and block 
printing; and to textiles. 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; laboratory section. T. Th 
second semester; laboratory section T. Th.. 1 i 



224 west Virginia University Catalogue 

12. Textiles. (3 Hrs.) History and evolution of the textile in- 
dustries; manufacturing conditions which affect the economic, hy- 
gienic, and aesthetic value of the material; household tests and grad- 
ing of textile materials. 

First semester; W. 11:00; laboratory, M. P., 10:00-12:00; Miss 
Reiley. 

13. Elementary Course in Clothing. (3 Hrs.) For students who 
have offered sewing for entrance. This course includes hand sewing; 
the use of sewing machine and its attachments; the use of commer- 
cial patterns. 

First semester; laboratory section, M. W. F., 2:00; Miss Reiley. 

43. Elementary Course in Clothing. (4 Hrs.) Similar to course 
13, for those students who do not offer sewing for entrance. 

First or second semester; M. W. F. S., 8: 00-10: 00; Miss Schultz. 

44. Slection of Clothing. (3 Hrs.) A continuation of courses 13 and 
43. 

First semester; M. W. F., 8:00-10:00; second semester; M. W. F., 
2:00-4:00; Miss Reiley. 

40. Elementary Course in Clothing. (2 Hrs.) A course similar to 
course 13 but shorter. 

First or second semester; M. W., 2:00-4:00; Miss Reiley. 

15. Textiles. (3 Hrs.) A study of the chemical and miscroscopic 
nature of textile fibres; the different weaves and their physical, chem- 
ical and miscroscopic examination of textiles, dyeing, weaving, and* 
a selection of textile fabrics suitable for use in home furnishing and 
for clothing. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Miss Reiley. 

16. Costume Designing. (2 Hrs.) This course includes a study 
of historic costume and its influence on modern dress; original de- 
signs for dresses for various occasions and designs suitable for dif- 
ferent figures. 

First semester; M. W., 2:00-4:00; Miss Gill, 8 W. 

17. Garment Construction. (3 Hrs.) Drafting, modeling, and de- 
signing patterns for various costumes to be made in the laboratory. 
A study will be made of hygienic and economic problems of the home- 
made garment as compared to the factory product. 

Second semester; M. W.. 1:30-4:30; Miss Gill. 

19. Modern and Period Furnishings. (2 Hrs.) Modern and period 
decorations and furnishings; original designs showing harmonious 
treatments In selection and arrangement of furnishings. 

Second semester; T. Th., 10:00-12:00; Miss Gill. 



The Coa P Agrici L/l 

The House and the Family. 

9. Hygiene of the Family Group. (2 Hrs.) The purpose of this 
course is to give a knowledge of those principles of sanitation which 
are essential to the well-being of the family group. Parallel eon 
Bacteriology 5. 

Second semester; T. Th., 9:00; Miss Rkiiftt. 9 W. 

14. Elementary Home Planning and Furnishing. (3 Hrs.) A study 
of the structural lines and decoration of the home, including prob 
in the arrangement of furnishings, treatment of the walls, floor and 
ceiling; and the selection of furnishings for an estimated cost. K- 
quired of students in vocational education. 

Second semester; M \V. F. 8:00-10:00; MN< Rf.ii.ky and Miss ()\i\ 

18. Home Planning and Furnishing. (3 Hrs.) Evolution of the 
house; location and construction of modern houses are studied from 
the sanitary, economic and artistic point of view; a study of architec- 
tural styles; designing of floor plan and elevations of a house for an 
estimated cost. 

Second semester; M. W. F.. 10:00-12:00; Miss Giu. and Miss 

Rf.11 FY. 

51. Housewifery. (2 Hrs.) A study of the care of the equipment 
of the home under varied living conditions as represented by t> 

of different homes. Prerequisite: All required courses in home I 
nomics for vocational home economics. 

First semester: T. Tk.. 11 :00 or T. Th., 4:( 

52. Home Management. (2 Hrs.) A study of the administrative 
side of the home, which includes the budget and time schedule based 
upon data obtained in the food, clothing and shelter courses. Prere- 
quisite: All required courses in home economies for vocational home 
econo:. 

Second semester; T. Th.. 11:00 <>r T. F. 4:00. 

50. Demonstration Home. (3 Hrs.) This course includes prac- 
tical work in marketing, planning, and serving meals and other prob- 
lems in home management. Students taking this course are expected 
to live in the demonstration home. Required of students in voca- 
tional education. 

First or second semes;- r; \--ociate Professor OotWHJ and I 
BCHTTLTS. 



226 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Teachers' Courses. 

26. Home Economics in Public Schools. (2 Hrs.) Open only to 
seniors. A brief survey of the development of home economics and 
its present status. Establishment of standards by means of which 
subject matter may be selected for elementary, secondary, and rural 
schools. Parallel course, Education 10. Prerequisite: All required 
home economics courses. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:00; Miss Gill. 

27. Teachers' Course in Home Economics. (3 Hrs.) This course 
includes a study of sequence of subject matter in planning courses 
of study in public schools; special methods of presentation; corre- 
lation with other subjects in the schools. Prerequisite: Home eco- 
nomics 26. 

Second semester; M. W. F.. 9:00; Associate Professor Colwell. 

36. Vocational Home Economics in Public Schools. (2 Hrs.) A 
study of the subject matter which should be presented in vocational 
schools in clothing and textiles. Required of students in vocational 
education. 

First semester; T. Th., 10:00; Professor Colwell and Miss Gill. 

37. Teachers' Course in Vocational Home Economics. (3 Hrs.) 
This course includes a study of sequence of subject matter in foods 
and home management for vocational schools. Prerequisite: Home 
economics 36. Required of students in vocational education. 

Second semester; M. W. F.. 9:00; Associate Professor Colwell. 

8. Special Problems. (1-4 Hrs.) Open to juniors and seniors. 
Thesis course. This course is designed to give advanced work in 
foods and related home economic problems. Lectures, conferences, 
laboratory work. Prerequisite: Home economics 1, 2 and 4; Chem- 
istry 1 and 2; Botany 1 and 2, or Zoology 1. 

First or second semester; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor 
Colwell. 



BE 

IV AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DEP 

The ,.., -uk. Dep-runet -.»bl«h^ by tfc« 

DD|Tereil r support wa, given by an act 

:. legally establishing and defining the wo.-, 
Apartment. Th:- *»* - 8 

of 1 

.r in order to promote the impr. ^"^T^ 

of ag Tlf . dome, . 

"^Tne worTof the agricultural extension department c 

culture «oc. 

^n^rchard^- 

^rtment of AgrtcSur 
operation with tl 'SESLkmE* agricultural 

and girls' agricultur 
agents and 

of their respective count e* of ^ ^^^"SwwT «nd of — * 
domestic science by mail ; ndb : ^^f [ * work of lhe co- 
other methods as may carry the ben.. ^ Vr 
of agriculture, the %^^^ure ?o the People of 

cultural extension department- 

work of the Agricultural Extension ^™< * f* ? £ 
ported bv an act of - appro-. TL!!j£ 

Tm" h LeVer Act. which 

fion lr demonstration work «- and home economic. «~ 

geat npon equal apiBppriations by the D 



228 West Virginia University Catalogue 

FORMS OF WORK. 

The following forms of agricultural extension work are now con- 
ducted in the various sections of the state: 

1. Agricultural schools and schools of home economics, held for 
one week at a suitable center in each county. 

2. Farmers' institutes wherever they may be of service to the 
farmers and their families. 

3. Demonstrations in pruning fruit trees, spraying fruit trees, 
thinning fruit, packing fruit, mixing commercial fertilizer, feeding 
live stock, corn variety tests, growing of legumes and the keeping of 
farm and household records and accounts. 

4. The encouragement of the teaching of agriculture in the public 
schools by: 

(a) Supervision of the agricultural courses of study, instructional 
work at teachers' institutes, round table meetings, conferences of 
county and district teachers, and special lectures at granges, clubs, 
and other organizations interested in the teaching of agriculture in 
the public schools. (This work is in cooperation with the State De- 
partment of Free Schools at Charleston.) 

(b) Organizing boys' and girls' clubs for growing and judging 
poultry, swine, corn and potatoes and growing and canning vegetables, 
etc. (This work is in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture.) 

(c) A monthly circular letter on elementary agriculture for school 
teachers. 

5. Correspondence courses in agriculture and home economics. 

6. Farmers' reading circle courses. 

7. Publications: 

Boys' and Girls' Agricultural Club Circulars. 
Agricultural press service. 
Extension circulars. 

8. Supervision of the county agricultural agents and demonstra- 
tors. 

(This work is in cooperation with the Farmers' Cooperative Dem- 
onstration Work, U. S. Department of Agriculture.) 

9. Correspondence: This includes the identification of plants 
and insects, inquiries covering agricultural problems, and assistance 
to the school, the home or other organizations in advancing move- 
ments to increase the worth and dignity of a rural life. 

For further information concerning the work of this department, 
address Director Nat T. Frame. 



Thh Col imam o» Aomcuut 229 

THE FARMERS' WEEK. 
The Fanners' Week eonaisti of popular lectures, demon 

and exercises planned for the benefit Of various classes of farn • r 
and farm women. The faculty an lOSkOM who I 

been unusually successful, and who arc known 

ticular line in which they give instruction. The derailed work gtren 
is changed from year to year. 

In order to meet the needs of as large a number of p- 
possible, lectures on the following subjects will be iriven: 
agriculture. Animal industry. Dairy husbandry. Horticulture, Poultry 
husbandry, and Home economics. The work consists of practical and 
scientific lectures and practice work in the laboratory or barn, or on 
the University farm. The instructional work is L'iven by the regular 
teachers of the College of Agriculture and by practical agricultural 
and home economics expert! who are familiar with our prob. 
valuable feature is the series of evening meetings where addn- 
will be made by some of the most prominent speakers of West Vir- 
ginia and other states. 

The Farmers' Week is open to everyone over six 
age. The work is designed for men of middle age as well as for the 
young farmer. There are no entrance examinations. A spa 
is given for boys and girls. 

Expenses. No fees will be charged those attending Far:: 
Week. No text-books will be required, though some may be used to 
advantage for reference. Board and room ma;. ired at i 

to $6.00 per week. The total • of the course, inclusive of rail- 

road fare, need not exceed $12.00. 

Detailed announcements for the course in 1919 may be obtained 
upon application to the Dean of the College of Agriculture or to the 
Director of Agricultural Extension, Iforgantown, West Virginia. 






THE COLLEGE OE LAW 



THE FACULTY. 



FRANK BUTLER TROTTER. A.M.. LLC, l Mv\ rsity 

HENRY CRAIG JONES. A.B., LL.B.. D< an and Pruft s.s>,r Oj 1 
WILLIAM P. WILLEY. A.M., Professor of Law, Vf* ritux 
JAMES RUSSELL TROTTER. A.M., LL.B., Professor of I 
JAMES WIGGINS SIMONTON. A.B., J.D., Proftssor of L 

THOMAS PORTER HARDMAN. M.A., LL.B., Ji r Dr.. A Pro- 

f> ss>>r of Law 

LEO CARLIN, A.B., LLB, Assistant Professor of Law 



CHARLES BDMUND NEIL. A.M.. Profettor of PubHc Bpeokm§ 



KATHARINE RUSSELL, Secretary and Librarian 
WILLIAM WALTER WALT;: IS 

SR8QN McCOT, / nt. 



232 West Virginia University Catalogue 

HISTORY AND PURPOSE. 

The College of Law was established in 1878 and is the oldest pro- 
fessional school in the University. It is the only law school in the 
state of West Virginia. A large proportion of the bench and bar of 
West Virginia have been enrolled among its students. 

Its course of instruction for the degree of Bachelor of Lav/3, 
originally requiring but one and later two years of law study, was, in 
1912, fixed at three years. In 1913 a requirement of one year of 
college work for admission was added. 

In 1914 the College of Law was admitted to membership in the 
Association of American Law Schools, an organization of the leading 
law schools of the United States for the purpose of establishing and 
maintaining high standards of legal education. 

The purpose of the instruction given in the College of Law is to 
train the student thoroughly in the principles and procedure of the 
common law with particular reference to their application or modi- 
fication by decision and statute in West Virginia. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The College of Law occupies about one-half of the second floor 
of Woodburn Hall. About one-half of this space is used by the Law 
library and the private offices of the members of the law faculty. 
The remainder is devoted to class-room and practice-court use. 

NEW LAW BUILDING. 

The legislature has appropriated the sum of $125,000 for the erec- 
tion of a building for the College of Law. It is expected that con- 
struction will begin in the summer of 1919 and that the building may 
be completed in the summer of 1920. 

LAW LIBRARY. 

The Law Library numbers about 13,000 volumes. It contains the 
reports of all the States, either to the National Reporter System or 
complete (Including several sets of West Virginia reports), the com- 
plete National Reporter System, the complete reports of the Federal 
courts, the American Decisions, American Reports, Lawyers' Reports 
Annotated (both series), the various encyclopedias of law, the Century 
and Decennial digests, the American Digest, Key-Number Series, to 
date, a collection of English reports containing the English Reprint 
and Law Reports, complete sets of leading English and American 
legal periodicals, over 1,000 volumes of treatises, about 800 volumes of 
state and federal statutes, including the latest codes, compilations and 
acts of the United States and of all the States together with a com- 
plete collection of the various codes and acts of Virginia and West 
Virginia, and about 500 volumes of briefs and records of cases decided 
by the Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia. 



Tin: Cm. lick Of L*W 
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

CANDIDACY FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

The following persona will be Admitted to the College of Law as 

candidates tor tile degree of Bachelor of Lav. 

1. Graduates of colleges of approved standing. 

2. Those having credit: (a) for fifteen units preparatory work 
(see below), and (b) for not less than 32 hours of work of col- 
legiate grade in an institution of approved standing, which must 
include six hours of English (English 1 and 2 or equivalent), U 
hours of economics, and six hours of history. Persons having credit 
for all preparatory entrance requirements and twenty-nine of the 
thirty-two required hours may be granted admission to the first ; 
class, conditioned upon the removal of such deficiency before the 
opening of the following year. 

The fifteen units of preparatory work which are required as 
stated in 1(a) above include the following: 

1. English: Students are admitted to the freshman classes in 
Kngllab on completion of a four year high school course in English. 
or its equivalent, and receive credit for three or four units. 

2. Latin: Two units are required. 

3. Mathematics: One unit of algebra and one of plane geometry 
are required. 

4. History: One unit is required. 

5. Science: One unit is required of either physics, chemistry, 
botany, zoology, or bioloey. 

6. Elective: Enough is required from the following list to com- 
plete 15 units: 

Drawing (free hand and mechanical) __.l to 2 units 

French 

German 1 to 3 

Greek 1 to 3 

Latin 1 to I 

Science i to 2 

Social Science (including history, civ 

and economics) 1 to 3 

Mathematics .} to 1 

Vocational subjects (including agricul- 
ture, commercial subjects, and man- 
ual training) 1 to 3 

Other subjects which have a re c ognis e d place in the first 
hierh schools will also b»' accepted by the committee on entrance. 



234 West Virginia University Catalogue 

A single unit of language will not be accepted unless further 
work in that language is included in the 32 hours of work of col- 
legiate grade offered. 

For a detailed statement of the amount of work required for 
each unit of entrance credit see the University Catalogue, pages 57-64. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

In rare instances persons who cannot qualify as candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws may be admitted as special students 
on petition to the committee on entrance, approved by the faculty 
of the College of Law. The applicant must show that he is more 
than 22 years of age, that he is unable to pursue such studies as will 
qualify him for admission as a regular student, that he possesses such 
educational training and practical experience as should enable him 
to pursue the study of law satisfactorily, and that he has satisfied 
the academic requirements specified by the order of the Supreme 
Court of Appeals, passed May 6, 1915, as preliminary to law study 
for all persons seeking admission to the bar in West Virginia. (See 
page 236). Permission to enter as a special student will be granted 
only in exceptional cases and will be subject to termination for un- 
satisfactory scholarship or conduct. 

STUDENTS IN OTHER COLLEGES. 

Students of at least junior standing in other colleges of the 
University may be permitted to take work in the College of Law sub- 
ject to the regulations of the College where they are registered and 
of the College of Law, but conditioned in each case upon the consent 
of the instructor giving the course which such student desires to take. 

ADMISSION TO COMBINED COURSE. 

A student may secure the degree of Bachelor of Arts and Bach- 
elor of Laws in six years under the following regulation of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

Any candidate for the A. B. degree, who, at the end of the junior 
year has completed 96 semester hours and who has satisfied all other 
requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences for this degree, may 
in his senior year take the full first year of the law course, and upon 
completion of the same shall be entitled to receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. But if a student has to his credit 92 semester 
hours at the end of his junior year, he may, subject to the approval 
of the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the dean of the 
College of Law, be allowed to enter upon the first year of the work 






Tin. ( '"'i.i.i <,i 01 L\w 

of the law course, in which case the d ill be Withheld u 

he attain four additional credit hour.- Such ca* WttT, shall !>■• 

treated as exceptiona and the Btudenl is org* tnplete U 

96 hours of required work in the College ol An- and Sci.no 
beginning the study ol law. No student may substitute the Ml*1 
of law as above provided, who shall have tailed to maintain a uniform 
record of good scholarship to the end of his Junior year in the Coil 
of Arts and Sciem • 

No work included in the ftbOYe M credits and counted toward 
the A.B. degree may be again counted toward the LL.i: 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Applicants for admission to advanced standing must satisfy the 
following requirements: 

1. Compliance with the requirements for admission to the first 
year class. 

2. For admission to the second year class, applicants must hav- 
successfully pursued the study of law for at least one year in an ap- 
proved law school, where they have received credit for courses equi\- 
alent to those required for admission to the second year class in the 
College of Law. 

3. For admission to the third year class, applicants must hav 
successfully pursued the study of law for at least two rears in an 
approved law school where they have received credit for courses 
equivalent to those required for admission to the third year claai in 
the College of Law. 

No credit will be given for work done in a law office. 

No student may receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws without 
at least one year's residence in the University and the successful 
passing of COOT* gating thirty semester hours pursued in the 

College of Law-. 

Any applicant for advanced standing may also, in the discretion 
of the law faculty, be required to undergo an examination In any or 
all of the subjects presented for advanced standing. 



236 West Virginia University Catalogue 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES. 

BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

Students who have satisfied the preparatory and college require- 
ments for entrance to the College of Law as candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, and who have satisfactorily completed courses 
aggregating eighty-six hours, distributed over three years residence 
and who have otherwise satisfied the requirements of the University 
and of the College of Law, will be granted the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. 

The eighty-six hours offered by a student for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws must include the following courses: Contracts, 
Personal property, Agency, Torts, Common law pleading, Criminal 
law and procedure, Real property I, Real property II, Evidence, Equity 
jurisdiction I, Practice and procedure, and Practice court. 

Such students as may be required to take military science after 
enrolling in the College of Law will be permitted to substitute two 
hours' credit in military science for two hours of law. 

ADMISSION TO THE BAR. 

Under the provisions of ch. 119, sec. 1, of the West Virginia Code, 
those who receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws from the West 
Virginia University may be admitted to the bar without further ex- 
amination. 

By an order of the Supreme Court of Appeals, those members of 
the faculty of the College of Law of the rank of professor, associate 
professor, or assistant professor, are constituted the State Board of 
Law Examiners for the purpose of examining candidates for admis- 
sion to the bar. In performing its duties as the State Board of Law 
Examiners the law faculty acts under the control and supervision of 
the Supreme Court of Appeals. 

The bar examinations are held at Charleston and Morgantown 
simultaneously on the second Wednesday and Thursday of March and 
September. 

An order of the Supreme Court of Appeals entered May 6, 1915 
provides that persons applying for license to practice law in West 
Virginia must satisfy the following requirements as to period of study 
and degree of preparation: 

"(a) A preliminary academic education equivalent to that required 
for graduation from a high school of the first class in West Virginia, 
which may be evidenced by a diploma of graduation from such a high 
school or by a certificate showing equivalent credits from any other 



Tin. CO] LEGE 01 Law 

school whose credits would be accepted fur admission to Weal Vir- 
ginia University, or by p iminatlon on equivalent subjeeta. 
"(b) Three years of diligent law study as ■ student in the office 

of and under the direction of. a member Of the bar of this State (or 
another state), or as S resident student in an approved 1; 
evidenced by s certificate to the Btate Hoard of Law Examln< 

the attorney under whom, or the head of tl • Which, 

such study was pursued, showing in detail the work done. In in- 
terpreting the above requirement, not lees than ten months, exclusive 

Of vacations, shall constitute one year <>f Office study, and not leal 

than eight months, exclusive of vacations, shall constitute on- 
Of law school study." 

Information as to bar examinations and as to other ma" 
ing to admission to the bar may be obtained upon inquiry dil 
to the State Board of Law Examim tntown. 



WEST VIRGINIA LAW QUARTERLY. 

The West Virginia Law Quarterly is published by the faculty of 
the College of Law and appears in November. January, April and 
June. It is the official publication of The Weal Virginia Bar Associa- 
tion. Publication of the Law Quarterly was suspended during the 
year 1918-19. but resumption of publication in November, 1919, is ex- 
pected. 



UNIVERSITY FEES AND EXPENSES. 

Students in the College of Law who are not State cadets are 
charged: 

A tuition of $15.00 a semester or $25.00 a year if residents of 
West Virginia, and $30.00 a semester or $50.00 a year if non-residents. 

A matriculation fee of $5.00 payable upon entering the University. 

A contingent fee of $3.00 per semester. 

All students in the College of Law are also charged: 

An athletic fee of $2.50 per semester. 

A medical fee of $2.00 per semester. 

A diploma fee of $5.00 payable at the beginning of the sen.' 
in which the student expects to receive his degree. 

A fee of $2.00 each semester Is Charged for registration and the 
issuance of class cards. This fee is remitted to all sii; 
procure class cards during the first three day? of the Orel 
and the first two days of the second sem» - 



238 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Refunding of Tuition and Fees. 

Students who withdraw from the University for good and suffi- 
cient reasons during the first two weeks of the semester, will have 
their tuition refunded upon making application to the registrar, but 
matriculation, contingent, athletic and registration fees will not be 
refunded. 

Students who have paid tuition for the year and who for any 
reason cannot attend during the second semester, may have the ex- 
cess paid above the amount of one semester's tuition refunded, upon 
application. 

Students who receive appointment as state cadets after the pay- 
ment of tuition and fees, but before the first nine weeks of the 
semester have elapsed, may have refunded to them all tunition and 
fees not properly chargeable to state cadets. 

COST OF A YEAR'S WORK. 

Board and lodging may be obtained in Morgantown for from 
$5.00 to $7.00 a week. Furnished rooms may be obtained at from 
$1.50 to $2.00 a week with two in a room. Board in private families 
or in students' boarding clubs costs from $5.00 to $6.00 a week. A 
student's washing will cost usually from $10.00 to $18.00 a year, his 
text-books from $8.00 to $30.00 a year, and his contingent and athletic 
fees from $15.00 to $35.00 a year. To these fixed charges must also 
be added matriculation, tuition, diploma, and laboratory fees, in the 
case of students who are required to pay them. Travelling expenses, 
clothing, and miscellaneous expenses will depend largely upon the 
tastes and habits of the individual. In general it may be said that 
the legitimate cost of a nine months' term of residence at the Univer- 
sity ranges from $300.00 to $400.00, exclusive of traveling expenses. 

Text-books are kept for sale in the University book store. A 
book exchange is maintained by the College of Law where second 
hand law books may be sold or bought without any commission being 
charged. 

State cadets are furnished their stationery and text-books to the 
value of $10.00. 



The I Jolli oi of Law 

COURSES AND EXAMINATIONS. 

COURSES. 

Ail cour rui either throughout the entire rear or thi 

one semester. No credit will be given for leei than an entfo 

except by special order of the law faculty. Graft m 

of the Orel Bemeeter in oouraes extending throughout the :•■ 

merely indicative of the quality of work done hy the student to 
point and do not give credit for the part of the GOUTM BO far pur- 
sued. Such first semeeter grade may !».• oonsldered in dete rminin g 

the final grade. Any student who fails in tin- first semester's work 
in any such OOttTae will not be permitted to continue that com 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Students are required to take all regular examinations. No stu- 
dent who absents himself from any such examination without !>• 
excused therefrom by the faculty of the College of Law. will receive 
credit unless he repeats the course successfully. If absence from a 
final examination is granted by the faculty. th» Student's t r rade in 
that course will be withheld until he has passed the next examination 
for the removal of conditions in the course. Application for 1- 
to be absent from a regular examination must be made before the 
hour at which such examination closes. 

Regular Examinations are held at the end of each Bemeeter in 
all courses. The period devoted to such examinations and the length 
of time of each examination are determined hy the faculty of the Col- 
lege of Law. 

Examinations for Removal of Conditions are held during the 
seven days Immediately following the day for mid-semester reports 
in the second semester and the seven days immediately following 
the opening of the University in the fall. No other special examina- 
tions are given 

GRADES. 

Reports of students' grades are made at the end of each 
If such grade be at the end of the course, it is the student 

for the course; if at the end of the first 
tending throughout the year, it is merely ind 
of the student's work that far in th< 

In determining grad< hi as he 

deems best to examinations, daily recitations, and attenda: 



240 West Virginia University Catalogue 

may refuse examination to any student because of poor attendance. 
One per cent, is deducted by the Registrar from the grade reported 
by the instructor for each unexcused absence in the course during 
the semester for which the grade is given. 

The privilege of final examination is denied a student absent, 
for any cause, from 20% of the class periods of a course, or from 25% 
of the class periods of the last semester of a course running through 
the year. The privilege of mid-year examination is denied a student 
absent, for any cause, from 25% of the class periods of the first 
semester, in a course running through the year, and he will be re- 
quested to drop the course. The operation of this rule may be sus- 
pended by the law faculty in cases where substantially all of the ab- 
sences were unavoidable, but in all such cases the time lost must 
be made up by attendance at an approved law school before the stu- 
dent will be recommended for a degree or before his attendance 
will be certified to another law school. 

Students who fail in any course are given no credit for it. 

A student who is conditioned in any course will receive no credit 
for it unless he pass the next examination for removal of conditions 
in that subject, provided, however, that the faculty may require a 
student to complete certain supplementary work in lieu of such ex- 
amination or in addition thereto. 

The law faculty may warn any student whose work is deemed 
unsatisfactory, place him on probation, or refuse his re-registration 
in the College of Law. 



The Collegi oi Lwv Ml 

METHOD OF INSTRUCTION. 

The work of the students in courses other than those in drafting 
and the practice court is based chiefly upon the study and discussion 
of decided cases, with collateral reading of statutes, appn m 
books and periodicals, elucidated by free discussion in the class. 

COURSES IN PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE. 

Practice and Procedure. Instruction in practice and procedure 

is preparatory and supplementary to the work of the practice court, 
and is conducted by text-book, lectures and special study of 
statutes and decisions governing West Virginia and Federal prac- 
tice and procedure. Attention is given to the jurisdiction and func- 
tions of the Supreme Court of Appeals, the Circuit. County and in- 
ferior Courts, the various Federal Courts, and the powers, duties, and 
liabilities of attorneys at law as officers of the court. Careful con- 
sideration is also given to the canons of professional ethics adopted 
by the American Bar Association and *he West Virginia 13ar Asso- 
ciation. The statutes and decisions governing the purpose and use of 
extraordinary legal remedies, such as mandamus, habeas corpus, cer- 
tiorari, quo warranto, etc., receive careful attention. 

Practice Courts. There are two practice courts: first, a nisi prius 
court exercising original jurisdiction in law, equity, criminal, and 
probate cases, and, second, a supreme court of appeals to review the 
case tried in the court of first instance. 

Every third-year student, before receiving the bachelor's deg 
is required to prepare the pleadings and prosecute to judgment the 
required number of cases in the nisi prius court, with the privilege of 
appeal to the appellate tribunal. The equivalent of at hast four 
hours in each week during the second semester must be spent by 
each third-year student in participation in practice court work in the 
court room. 

Statements of facts are furnished, such as would be related to a 
lawyer in active practice by his client. Each student must determine 
whether or not upon such facts the particular case in hand is one of 
common law. equity, criminal or probate cognizance. He must then 
frame his pleadir. . his summons or notice, and answer his 

adversary's pleadings until issue is joined in legal manner, after 
which the case is brought on for hearing in strict accordance with 
settled legal procedure, witnesses are examined and cross-, xamined. 
and the case conducted through all the variou- of the trial 

or hearing down to and including the judgment :. r o. 



242 West Virginia University Catalogue 

after which, should the case be appealed, it must be carried through 
the Supreme Court, involving the preparation of the record on appeal, 
briefs of counsel, etc. 

The clerk and his assistant are chosen from the student body, 
from whose ranks are also drawn the sheriff, jurors, and other offi- 
cials, thus giving to the students the benefits of practice in admin- 
istrative judicial machinery. The sessions are presided over by that 
member of the law faculty who has charge of practice courses. 

Drafting of Legal Instruments. Students are instructed in this 
course in the actual preparation of deeds, mortgages, wills, abstracts 
and opinions of title, assignments, contracts, partnership agreements, 
and other legal instruments which a lawyer is called upon to prepare. 
Statements of facts are furnished to the class by the instructor in 
charge and each student is required to prepare the various forms of 
instruments. These are corrected by the instructor and are discussed 
and criticized in class. Careful consideration is given to special forms 
of execution and acknowledgment when one of the parties is a cor- 
poration, a partnership, a married woman, or the like. 

Drafting of Pleadings at Law and in Equity. This course sup- 
plements the earlier courses in the principles of common law plead- 
ing and equity pleadings by giving the student practical knowledge and 
experience through the drafting of the pleadings themselves. State- 
ments of facts such as a client might relate to an attorney are fur- 
nished to the student, on which he is required to draft declarations, 
bills, pleas, answers, replications, etc. 



Tin: COUMOM Of Law 243 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of .vers 

a period of three academic years. The work of the first year is pre- 
scribed. All of the studies of the second year are elective »xcept 
Evidence. Real property II, and Equity jurisdiction I, and all of the 
third year courses except Practice and procedure and Practice Court. 
Second year courses may be elected by third year students, but third 
year courses will not in general be open to second year students. A 
few subjects that are given only in alternate years may be elected by 
both second and third year students. All required courses are marked 
by an asterisk. 

It is expected that each student will carry fourteen hours of class 
room work per week during the first and second years and fifteen 
during the third year. Not less than thirteen nor more than sixteen 
hours may be carried without the special consent of the law faculty. 

PROGRAM OF COURSES FOR 1919-20f 

The program here given contains the courses usually offered but 
is subject to change. Some of the second and third year courses will 
not be given in 1919-20. 

First Year. 

•Agency. (4 Hrs.) Four hours a week in the second semester. 
"Wambaugh, Cases on Agency. Associate Professor Hardv 

♦Common Law Pleading. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week throughout 
the year. Sunderland, Cases on Common Law Pleading. Assistant 
Professor Cari.in. 

•Contracts. (6 Hrs.) Four hours a week in the first semester 
and two hours a week in the second semester. Williston. Cases on Con- 
tracts. Professor Simontox. 

♦Criminal Law and Procedure. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week 
throughout the year. Mikell. Cases on Criminal Law and Criminal 
Procedure. Professor J. R. Trotter. 

♦Personal Property. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the first 
semester. Warren, Cases on Property. Professor Simonton. 

♦Real Property 1. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second 
semester. Warren. Cases on Property. Professor Simon- 

♦Torts. (6 Hrs.) Four hours a week in the first semester and 
two hours a work in the second semester. Ames and Smith. Cases on 
Torts, (ed. 1909-10). Professor H. C. J<>- 

tThe program here given contains the ally offered but is - 

to changp. Some of the second and third year courses will not be given in 1919-20. 



244 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Second Year. 

Damages. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in second semester. Beale. 
Cases on Damages, (2d ed.) Professor H. C. Jones. 

Drafting of Pleadings at Law and in Equity. (1 Hr.) One hour 
a week in the first semester. See page — for information as to the 
work in this course. Assistant Professor Carlin. 

♦Equity Jurisdiction 1. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week throughout 
the year. Ames, Cases on Equity Jurisdiction, vol. 1. Professor H. C. 
Jones. 

♦Equity Pleading. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second 
semester. Selected cases. Assistant Professor Carlin. 

♦Evidence. (5 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the first semester and 
three hours a week in the second semester. Thayer, Cases on Evi- 
dence, (2d ed.). Associate Professor Hardman. 

Insurance. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second semester. 
Wambaugh. Cases on Insurance. Professor H. C. Jones. 

Legal Ethics. (1 Hr.) One hour a week in the second semester 
Costigan, Cases on Legal Ethics. Assistant Professor Carlin. 

Negotiable Instruments. (3 Hrs.) Three hours a week in first 
semester. Smith and Moore, Cases on Bills and Notes. Associate Pro- 
fessor Hardman. 

Persons and Domestic Relations. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week 
in the first semester. Smith, Cases on Persons. Professor J. R. Trot- 
ter. 

♦Real Property II. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week throughout the 
year. Warren, Cases on Property, and Gray, Cases on Property, vol. 3, 
(2d ed.). Professor Simonton. 

Sales of Personal Property. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week through- 
out the year. Williston, Cases on Sales, (2d ed.). Professor J. R. 
Trotter. 

Trusts. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week throughout the year. Ames, 
Cases on Trusts, (2d ed.), and Scott, Cases on Resulting and Con- 
structive Trusts. Professor Simonton. 

Wills and Administration. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the 
second semester. Costigan, Cases on Wills. Professor J. R. Trotter. 



Tuk ( kW !.!.<; I OP I.\w 

Third Year. 

Bankruptcy. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the first Mffli 
Williston, Cases on Bankruptcy, (2d ed.). Associate Professor 

Hakdman. 

Conflict of Laws. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week throughout the 

year. Beale, Cases on Conflict of Laws, (shorter selection). 

Constitutional Law. (4 Bn.) Two hours a week throughout 
fear. Wamheogh, Casefl on Constitutional Law. Professor EL C. 

Drafting of Legal Instruments. (1 Hr.) One hour a week in the 
firs- 2 12 for Information as to the work in I 

course. Assistant Professor Caui.in. 

Equity Jurisdiction II. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the 
and semi ses on Equity Jurisdiction, vols. 1 and 2, 

i part^ i . Professor Si kok row. 

Equity Jurisdiction III. (Including Quasi Contracts.) (2 H 
Two hours a week in the second semester. Ames. D Equity 

Jurisdiction, vol. 2 (part), and Woodruff's Cases on Quasi Contr; 

Mining Law. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second semes- 
ter. Selected cssoa Professor Simon-ion. 

Municipal Corporations. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the first 

Beale, Cases on Municipal Corporations \ 
r HABDM 

Partnership. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week throughout the year. 
Gilmore. Cases on Partnership. Professor J. R. Tkot-ihk. 

*Practice and Procedure. (4 His.) Four hours a week in the 
first semester. Munson. Elementary Practice, selected cases, statutes, 
and lectures. Bee page 241 for information rk in this 

•ant Pro:" a in. 

♦Practice Court. (3 Hrs.) Court - and lecture perio*: 

Ifled bj the faculty. -i for Informs 

of the practice <<»urt. Assistant Pro- 
Private Corporations. (4 Hrs ) Two hours a week throughout 

the year. Warren. Cas.s on Prh porations, (2d ed.). Pro- 

>r J. R. Tbottbl 

Public Speaking 14: Argumentation and Debate. (2 Hrs ) Two 
hours a week in the firs- 
120. for information ork in thl 



246 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Public Speaking 15: Advanced Argumentation and Debate. (2 
Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second semester. See University Cata- 
logue, page 121 for information as # to work in this course. Profes- 
sor Neil. 

Public Utilities. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week throughout the 
year. Beale, Cases on Carriers, (2d ed.), and Wyman, Cases on Public 
Service Companies, (2d ed.). Associate Professor Hardman. 

Real Property III (Including Future Interests). (4 Hrs.) Two 
hours a week throughout the year. Gray, Cases on Property, vols. 5, 
6 (2d ed.). Professor Simonton. 

Suretyship. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the first semester. 
Ames, Cases on Suretyship. Professor H. C. Jones. 

SUMMER SESSION. 

A summer session of twelve weeks divided into two six-weeks' 
terms will be offered in 1919. The work of the Summer session is de- 
signed to benefit chiefly those whose courses of study have been inter- 
rupted by military service, but will also be useful to those who desire 
to pursue law study only during the summer because of being engaged 
in other pursuits during the remainder of the year. The courses of- 
fered are suitable for both beginning and advanced students. 

The success of the Summer Session of 1919 will determine whether 
it will be repeated in 1920. 



247 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



THE FACULTY. 

FRANK BUTLKR TROTTER, A.M., LL.D., PreHA III of th> I niv 

JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON. A I!., MI).. Dean and Professor of ! 
siology 

AARON ARKIN. M.I).. Ph.D., Professor of Pathology and Ita. t. nology 

SAMUEL JOHN MORRIS, M.I). AuociaU Profeuor of Anatomy 

WITH ROW MORSE, Ph.D.. AuOCiati Pi :>,<;i>al c). 

istry and Physiology ; -SV< retort/ of tin Faculty 

GORDON ALGER BERGY, Pii.C. M.S., Assistant Prof€990T of Phar- 

ma< y 

GIDEON S. DODDS, Ph.D.. Assistant Pn.frssor of Histology and F.m- 
bryoloyy 

ROBERT WALDORF FISHER. M.D., Instructor in Physual Diagnosis 

IKVIX HARDY, MS.. M.I).. Instructor in Minor Surg- 

ELMA HOARD. 1 B.S., Assistant in lia> teriology and Pathology 

HELEN If. WIESTLING, A. P.. Assistant in Pharmacology and Physio- 
logical Chemistry 



'ebruary l, 1919. 



248 West Virginia University Cataixxjue 

INSTRUCTION IN MEDICINE. 

Regular instruction in subjects preparatory to the study of medi- 
cine was first given in West Virginia University in 1871, the "chair 
of anatomy, physiology, and hygiene" having been established in that 
year. A curriculum covering the first two years of a standard four 
years' medical course was provided in 1902 and the work was placed 
in charge of the College of Medicine with a resident faculty of six 
men. In 1912 the College of Medicine became the School of Medicine. 
In reorganizing the work in medicine the Board of Regents retained 
the general character of the curriculum previously offered but pro- 
vided for a larger faculty, more laboratories and more adequate equip- 
ment. 

As at present constituted the West Virginia University School of 
Medicine has its own dean and faculty but confers no degrees in 
medicine. It is not affiliated with any other college or school of medi- 
cine and its students may go where they like to complete their medical 
studies and receive the degree of M.D. 

The School of Medicine is a member of the American Association 
of Medical Colleges (Class A). 

The work in physical diagnosis and in minor surgery is in charge 
of two practicing physicians, members of the local medical profession. 



INSTRUCTION IN PHARMACY. 

The following is an extract from the law of the State of West 
Virginia governing the practice of pharmacy: 

Sec. 11. In order to be hereafter licensed as a pharmacist within 
the meaning of this act, an applicant shall be not less than twenty- 
one years of age, and shall present to the board of pharmacy satis- 
factory evidence that he has had four years' experience in pharmacy 
under the instructions of a licensed pharmacist, and he shall pass 
a satisfactory examination by or under the direction of the board of 
pharmacy; in order to be licensed as an assistant pharmacist, within 
the meaning of this act, an applicant shall be not less than eighteen 
years of age, shall have a sufficient preliminary general education, 
and shall have not less than two years' experience in pharmacy under 
the instruction of a licensed pharmacist and shall pass a satisfactory 
examination by or under the direction of the board of pharmacy; 
provided, however, that in the case of a person who has attended a 
reputable school or college of pharmacy, the actual time of attending 
such school or college of pharmacy may be deducted from the time 
of experience required of pharmacists, but in no»case shall less than 
two years' experience be required for graduation as a licensed phar- 
macist. 



Thk School oi Itoicnti 

A Department of Pharmacy is established in the School 
cine and a two-year course in pharmacy leading U> the Degree * 
Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph.r,.); 1 thr. ■ "> the 

degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist (FnX.). •** - ^ 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pha,:. 
macy) are offered. 

A certificate of graduation from 
W{ ; t virgin llty. will be recognized by such state boards of 

Pharmacy as requir- a course in pharmacy preliminary to examina- 
tion for registration. 

The West Virginia State Board of Pharmacy does not require a 
college course of applicants presenting themselves for examination, 
but it strongly recommend me to all persons intending to 

come candidates for registration. 

THE MEDICAL BUILDING. 

A three story brick building furnishes room for the classes in 
medicine and pharmacy. 

On the first floor are found the offices of the dean, the physiolog- 
ical and pharmacological laboratories, the medical and pharmaceu- 
tical dispensaries. On the second floor are the laboratories of bacten- 
ologv and pathology, and two laboratories for physiological chem. 
The'third floor has a laboratory for gross anatomy, one for hist- 
and embryology and one for pharmacy. Each laboratory is provided 
with an abundance of light. In the basement are found rooms for 
the preparation and storage of cadavers. There is an incineratory 
plant for the disposal of refuse. 



MEDICAL DISPENSARY. 

A dispensary open to the- city poor is conducted by the physicians 
of the medical faculty. Free service ll rendered. The treating of 
patients is done by the faculty but students of the second year « 
are instructed in the proper methods of examining and d.agnosmg 
disease. This work supplements the courses in physical diagnosis and 

minor surgery. 

In return for the medical fee paid by all male students free serv- 
ice is rendered to students by the faculty and drucs are supplied free 
from the pharmaceutical dispensary. 



250 West Virginia University Catalogue 

LABORATORIES OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

ANATOMICAL LABORATORY. 

The anatomical laboratory is equipped with a Bausch & Lomb 
Balopticon for doing projective work, a complete set of imported 
models of the brain and nervous system, eye, ear, thoracic and abdom- 
inal viscera, joints and muscles. There are preserved sections of the 
body for use in the study of regional anatomy. Each student in gross 
anatomy has the use of a complete skeleton and each student in 
histology is provided with a miscroscope 

PATHOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

The pathological laboratory is equipped with all necessary appar- 
atus for general and special work, including paraffine and celloidin 
microtomes, freezing microtomes, paraffine ovens, Leitz miscroscopes 
with oil immersion lenses, all necessary stains and chemicals. There 
is also a projection apparatus with miscroscope attachment for dem- 
onstration purposes. The department possesses a large collection 
of mounted miscroscopic sections representing all the pathological 
processes and museum of gross specimens. Surgical material is 
obtained from the city hospital. 

LABORATORY OF MEDICAL BACTERIOLOGY. 

The bacteriological laboratory is equipped with all necessary ap- 
paratus, such as sterilizers, incubators, glassware, etc. Each student 
has the use of a microscope with oil immersion lens. Special ap- 
paratus for bacteriological examination of air, water, milk, blood, etc., 
is supplied to each student. Material for laboratory work in bacterio- 
logical diagnosis, such as Widal tests for typhoid, examination of 
sputum for tubercle bacilli, bacteriological examination of water, etc., 
is available. * 

PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMICAL LABORATORIES. 

The laboratory devoted to the work in physiology is supplied with 
tables, each accommodating two students who work together. Each 
table has a complete set of Havard physiological apparatus which 
is lent to the student with a charge for breakage only. There are 



The School of Mkdice 

for general use. kymographs, both single and double drum.-, apparatus 
for the study of the eye and special senses, several types Of sphy- 
gmomanometers for blood-pressure work, hemaglobinometers, hema- 
cytometers, a high-power electric centrifuge, an Erlanger respiratory 
apparatus, charts and models. 

The physiological chemical laboratory occupies the north wing 
of the second floor. Besides the ordinary apparatus for student 
use, such as glassware, stands, etc, there are a KjHdahl still. aspira- 
tion apparatus, automatic burettes with stock solutions, Duboscq 
colorimeter, a Gaertner spectrometer, VanSlyke amlno-nltrogen appara- 
*i:s. apparatus for the clinical study of acidosis (Van Blykfl Mid Mar 
rlott), thermostats, etc. 

In 1918, there was erected a special building of two floors near 
the Medical Building for the housing and care of animals. An opera- 
ting suite, animal hospital, room for storage of food, a room for small 
cages for guinea pigs, a series of larger rooms for keeping doL 
nd an autopsy room are provided. 



PHARMACEUTICAL LABORATORIES. 

Each of the two pharmaceutical laboratories will accommodate 
sixteen students. Microscopy, pharmacognosy, pharmaceutical test- 
ing and assay are carried on in one of the laboratories while work 
in manufacturing pharmacy is provided for in the other. The desks 
are equipped with gas. running water and drainage. All material 
and equipment necessary for thorough courses in these branches is at 
hand. 



PHARMACOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

The pharmacological laboratory is equipped with chemical desks, 
operating tables, and electrical kymograph and respiration apparatus 
for taking continuous records of respiration and blood pressure. 
Special animal cages are provided to meet the needs of courses 41 
to 47 inclusive. In addition, a ■pedal animal house for the proper 
care of experimental material is provided. Aside from the go 
equipment of the laboratory, each set of two students is provided with 
individual sets of apparatus and r. The laboratory || 

provided with a collection of crude dings, alkalod i, and 

analytical chemicals. 

The chemical, botanical, and 7. laboratories of th< 

sity are also open to students in the School of Medicine. 



252 West Virginia University Catalogue 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

In order that the medical library be accessible to all, it is main- 
tained by the general library, which is in close proximity to the School 
of Medicine. A special room, with desks and shelving is provided 
on the second floor of the Library Building, wherein are stored the 
bound volumes of the medical books and journals, the current numbers 
being placed in the general reading room available at all times to the 
students. Sets of the more important journals, in English and in the 
foreign languages, such as Hoppe-Seyler's Zeitschrift, the Journal of 
Biological Chemistry, American Journal of Physiology, Journals of 
Bacteriology, Cancer Research, Immunity, Anatomy, Laboratory and 
Clinical Medicine, as well as periodicals immediately bearing upon 
medicine, such as zoological, chemical, etc., are available. There are 
approximately 3,500 volumes. 

MEDICAL LABORATORY FEES. 

Students in laboratory courses pay special fees to cover the cost 
of materials used. These fees in the courses required of medical 
students are as follows: 

Gross Anatomy 13, 14 & 17 $12.00 

Histology 12 5.00 

Bacteriology 3 5.00 

Pathology 21 & 22 8.00 

Physiological chemistry 10 12.00 

Embryology 6 __• ' 3.00 

Pharmacology 40 & 41 7.50 

Physiology 4 & 5 7.50 

Neurology 6 2.00 

Minor operative surgery 1.00 

Total for two year course $63.00 

PHARMACY LABORATORY FEES. 

Chemistry 1 $ 5.00 

Chemistry 2 5.00 

Chemistry 17 10.00 

Chemistry 32 3.00 

Chemistry 9 12.00 

Pharmacy 3 3.00 

Pharmacy 5 10.00 

Pharmacy 7 5.00 

Pharmacy 9 5.00 

Pharmacodynamics 55 3.00 

Microscopy 10 200 

Physiology 6 2.00 

Botany 4 i 3. 00 

Total for two year course $68.00 



The School of Medk 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

For admission either to the medical course or to the phar: 
course in the School of Medicine the student must have credit for 
fifteen units of secondary school work, i. e., the work of a standard 
four-year high school. 

For admission to the course in medicine | 
in addition, have credit for sixty-four hours work done either in the 
College of Arts and Sciences of Wetl Virginia I'niversity or in an- 
other institution of equal prade. 

Secondary School Credits. 

Of the fifteen units of secondary work required nine are definitely 
prescribed as follows: 

Units 

English 3 

Latin | 

>ry 1 

Mathematics: algebra, 1 unit; plane geometry. 1 
unit; Total "_ . 

Science: physics, chemistry, botany, or zool< 

Any one of the four 1 

Total prescribed 

The remaining six units must be chosen as electives from the 
following list: 

Units 

Latin 1 to 2 

Greek 1 to 3 

German 1 to 3 

French 1 to 3 

Mathem;. • 

Algebra. £ unit j 

Solid geometry. J unit J- J tolj 

Plane trigonometry, J unit ^ 

History and civics J to 2 

Physics 1 

Chemistry 1 

Botany \ to 1 

Zoolocy \ to 1 

Physical Geography J 

Physiolopy \ 

Prawinp J to 1 

•rional studies 1 



254 West Virginia University Catalogue 

College Credits. 

The sixty-four hours of college work required for admission are 
indicated in the schedule on page 255. 

The American Medical Association and The Association of Amer- 
ican Medical Colleges require a minimum of twelve hours of chemistry 
and eight hours each of college work in biology, either zoology or bot- 
any, and physics. At least half of the work in zoology and chemistry 
and at least two hours of the work in physics must be done in the 
laboratory. Not less than six hours work in a foreign language pre- 
ferably French or German must be taken in addition to any work 
offered for entrance to the School of Medicine. 

NOTE: — No student can be admitted with less than sixty hours or 
with a condition either in preparatory subjects or in college chem- 
istry, physics, biology or modern language. 

Admission of Special Students in Pharmacy. 

Persons over nineteen years of age who bring evidence of having 
completed a grammar school education and two years in an approved 
high school, and of practice in pharmacy for at least two years, will 
be admitted as special students to the two-year course in pharmacy. 

NOTE:— By a resolution of the State Board of Health all appli- 
cants for license to practice medicine in West Virginia are required 
to file with the secretary of the Board their certificate of high school 
graduation or its equivalent. The secretary will investigate doubtful 
cases, asking the aid when necssary of the University Committee on 
Classification and Grades. 



The School of Medicine 
COURSES IN THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

THE COURSE IN MEDICINE. 

A student who desires to prepare himself for the practice of 
medicine and who ;sfied the requirements for entrance to 

freshman class of the College of Arts and Sciences may matric. 
in the College of Arts and Sciences and announce his intention of 
taking the combined scientific and medical cour r comple- 

sixty-four hours (two jreftJB) of work in this college he may enter 
upon the two years course of the School of Medicine. On the com- 
pletion of the course of this school he will receive the decree of 
Bachelor of Science. He may then enter a standard medical col'. 
complete its course and receive the degree of Doctor of M 
His college and medical course together will in this case usually 
occupy six years. 

The courses required in the College of Arts and Sciences and in 
the School of Medicine are indicated in the following schedule: 

SCHEDULE FOR THE COMBINED B.S. AND M.D. COURSE 

Courses in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
First Year — First Semester. First Year — Second Semester. 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

English 2fi 2 English 27 

Chemistry 1 4 Chemistry 2 4 

Zoology i 4 Zoology 2 4 

German 19 or French 3 3 German 22 or French 5 3 

Military BClence 1 17 Military science 1 17 

Second Year — First Semester. Second Year — Second Semester. 

Physics 1 3 Physics 3 3 

Botany 3 Elective 4 Physics \ 1 

Botany 3 4 Philosophy 14 

Chemistry 9 5 Chemistry 1.8 

Elective 2 Elective 3 

Military science 1 16 Military science 1 II 

Courses in the School of Medicine. 
Third Year— -First Semester. 

Phvsiological chemistry 10 8:00 M. YV. F.. 8:00 

Th - 6 

Histolocv 12 11:00 T. w 

11 :00 T. Th. 
Anatomy 13 - "" daily 

Military science 1 19 



256 West Virginia University Catai^gue 

Third Year — Second Semester. 

Bacteriology 3 2:00 T. Th M 8:00 S.; lab. 8:00- 

10:00 daily (first twelve 
weeks) 5 

Neurology 15 8:00-10:00 daily, 2:00 T. Th. 

(last six weeks) 2 

Embryology 6 10:00-12:00 M. Th.; 11:00 T. F. 3 

Anatomy 14 3:00-5:00 M. W. F., 9:00-12:00 

S. 3 

Physiology 2 2:00 M. W. F. 3 

Physiology 4 2:00-5:00 T. Th. 9 weeks 1 

Pharmacology 40 2:00-5:30 T. Th., 9 weeks 1 

Military science 1 19 

Fourth Year — First Semester. 
Pathology 21 8:00 M. W. F.; lab., 2:00-5:00 

M. W. F. 6 

Pharmacology 42 8:00 T. Th. S. 3 

Physiology 3 9:00 daily 5 

Physical diagnosis 31 10:00 M. Th. F. 3 

Physiology 5 2:00-5:00 T. Th. 2 

Military science 1 20 



Pharmacology 43 8 

Hygiene 5 8 

Minor surgery 51 9 

Pathology 22 11 



Fourth Year — Second Semester. 

00 M. W. F. 3 

00 T. Th. 2 

00 M. W. F. 3 
00 W.; lab., 10:00-12:00 

T. Th. 3 

Anatomy 17 2:00-5:00 T. Th. 2 

Operative surgery 52 9:00 S. 1 

Pharmacology 41 2:00-5:30 M. F. 2 

Military science 1 17 

Fifth and Sixth Years. 

To be taken at an approved School or College of Medicine. 

NOTE. — Medical students must take their work in sequence as 
shown in the schedule. If they fail in a course they may go on in the 
following year but the course must be taken again at the first op-' 
portunity. 

COURSES IN PHARMACY. 

The School of Medicine offers three courses in pharmacy: 

(a) A two years course (four semesters of eighteen weeks each) 
loading to the Professional Degree of Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph.G.). 
The specific curriculum required for this certificate is stated below. 

(b) A three years course leading to the professional Degree of 
Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph.C). 

(c) A four year combined academic and professional course lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.Sc. Pharm.). 



of Medicine 



CURRICULUM IN TWO-YEAR COURSE IN PHARMACY. 



First Year — First Semester. 

Pharmacy l and 2 m t. \y. Th. f. 

Pharmacy I and 3 1 5:00 If. Th. 

I'hvsiology 6 10:00 If. T. Th V 

Chemistry 1 11:00 If. W. I" T.; 2 00 W. \ 17 



First Year — Second Semester. 



Botany t 



9:00 M. W.; 9:00-1. 


T. 


Th. 


1 


10:00 M. v.: B:00 W. 


3 


2:00-5:00 w. F. 


3 


T. Th.: . Th. 


3 


11:00 If. \V. P.; 2:00-5:00 M 


4 17 



Pharmacy 3 

Pharmacy t 

Pharmaceutical chemist] 
Chemistry I 



Second Year — First Semester. 

Pharmacognosy and 

Materia medica 11 9:00 If. T. W. Th. F. 5 

Microscopy 10 10:00-12:00 T. Th. 2 

Pharmacy 6 11:00 If. W. F. 3 

Pharmacy 7 5:00 T. Th. 3 

Chemistry 9 10:00 |f. W. F.; T. Th. 2-5 3 16 



Second Year — Second Semester. 

Pharmacy 7 12:00 T. Th. 3 

Pharmacy 8 9:00 M. W. F. 3 

Pharmacy 9 2:00-5:00 W. F. 3 

Pharmacology 12 8:00 W. F. S. 3 

Pharmacology 41 2:00-5:00 M. F. 

First aid 17 10:00 If. F. 1 

Chemistry 36 11:00 If. W. F. 

In the foregoing curriculum the foundation in pharmacy and 
pharmacognosy is provided together with the essentials of analytical 
chemistry as applied in the drug business and required for various 
manufacturing purposes. All subjects scheduled for this COtm 
compulsory. The laboratory method of instruction is ci\ 
attention. The number of hours spent in this coins.' is 1882, Of which 
1090 are spent in the laboratory and the remaining 792 in 1 
quiz work. 

A special student who completes the t- uirse will r« I 

a certificate showing that he has pursued studies in phar- 



258 West Virginia University Catalog it. 

macy successfully for two years. These students may later become 
candidates for the degre of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy by 
completing the full entrance rquirements. 

THE THREE AND FOUR YEAR COURSES. 

The three-year course is designed particularly for those who 
desire to enter the commercial field of pharmaceutical chemistry and 
food and drug chemistry or for those pharmacists who wish to 
strengthen their professional relations by the practice of urinary, 
bacteriological, and toxicological analysis for the physician. Students 
are advised to select one phase of the advanced work and pursue 
it to completion as outlined since there would not be sufficient time 
in three years to permit of the successful accomplishment of both. 
The three-year course includes a foreign language, rhetoric, and 
science as well as advanced studies in pharmacy, microscopy, etc., 
not offered in the two year course. 

The four-year course is a combined academic and professional 
course. Mathematics, language and science as well as the entire 
pharmaceutical work of the two-year course are included. 



Tn - >L OF Mkdh I 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

ANATOMY. 

- j. Mows ami Assistant r I 

A study of OSteolOgy and articular riled on in CODJie 

with the dissection of the cadaver The cadaver is divided Inl 
parts for the purpose of d a; the head, Including the thor 

viscera, the arm. and the leg Including the abdominal ami pelvii 
cera. The work in gross anatomy is largely practical and 

almost entirely in th" discretion room. Practical >\ ■ 
l ted are beld at short intervals. 

13. Dissection. (7 His.) Required of all first year m»-dical stu- 
dents A careful dissection of muscles, nerves, blood and dif- 

ferenl organs of the body in situ. L stions (7G. hours) 

and laboratory (210 hours). Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Kir^t semestn -or s. J. sfos 

14. Dissection. (:; Ilrs.) Required of all first year medical stu- 
dents. A continuation of course 13, 54 hours lecture. 108 hours labora- 
tory. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Second semester; It W. F.. ; S., 9:00-12:00; Associate 

Professor S. J. MottlS. 

12. Histology. (5 Hrs.) Required of first year medical students 
and prerequisite for courses in pathology. The work includes the 
study of cells, tissues, ami organs, with the instruction in the ordi- 
nary methods of preparing tissues for miscroscopic examination. Lec- 
tures and quizzes. Laboratory fee. $5.00. Lectures, 36 hours; labora- 
tory 12G hours. 

First semester: T. \Y.. 11:00; laboratory. 9:00-12:00. M.; 10:00- 
Th. P.; Assistant Professor DoDDS. 

15. Neurology. (2 Hrs.) Required of all first-year medical stu- 
dents, a gross and m tudy of the central nervous system. 

Lectures. 36 hours; laboratory. ;u; hours. Laboratory fee. $2 

Second semester (Last Bis vreeks); T. Th., 2:00; laboratory, daily, 
8:00-10:0' •• Pro fessor s. j. Mono, 

17. Applied Anatomy. (2 Hrs.) Required of all .<♦■< ond-y.-ar medical 
students. Topographical ami applied anatomy of the entire body, in- 
cluding the cavities and viscera. Lectures, quizzes and demonstrar 

by use of models, special dissections and en - 30 

hours: laboratory. 72 hours. Laboratory fee. . ; ^ 

Second semester; T. Th g j 

BfOBBIS. 



260 West Virginia University Catalogue 

18. Advanced Histology. (2 Hrs.) Open to advanced and graduate 
students. More intensive study of some systems of organs and ap- 
plication of special methods. Includes laboratory work and study of 
current literature on the subject studied. 

Hours to be arranged. 

6. Vertebrate Embryology. (3 Hrs.) Required of first year medical 
students. The development of the human body is taught by means of 
studies on preparations of chick and pig embryos and models. Lec- 
tures 36 hours; laboratory, 72 hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Second semester; M. Th., 10:00-12:00; T. F., 11:00; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Dodds. 

19. Advanced Embryology. (2 Hrs.) Open to advanced and gradu- 
ate students. Special study of some phase of development, the sub- 
ject matter to be chosen with special reference to the interests of the 
students who may elect the course. 

Hours to be arranged; Assistant Professor Dodds. 



°G1 

Tin: School of Medicine 

BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY. 

p r(( f, nor Akkin and MlflB HdABn. 

The tolled courses aw required .1 all »»^']^ 
toriology 3. 5 his.; Bacteriology 5 (Hygiene and Banltatton) - 
Pathology 21. G Ins.; Pathology », 8 ins. 

3 Medical Bacterio.ogy. (5 Hra.) Preparation of culture media, 
,„,, stody of pathogenic bacteria and their relaUon .o diaeaae tteto 
I ,,;.r J wen J pathologic relation* Burterlologlc ■ -mumuon 

trom unknowns. Laboratory fee. $6.00. 

3econd aemeater. (first twelre week.); tectum , (40 hr*) T. Tn, 
,. S.. 8:00: laboratory, (ISO hrs.) M. T. W. Th. F., 8.00-10.00. 

4 Advanced Bateriology. d Hrs.) Open to fourth year and 

..,,, (1 lt, rtudent. Advanced bacteriologlc technique; method, am 
pow in 2 conduct of modern reaearcb problem, in bacterioto 

special cu.ture media, anaerobic cultivation, atainlng method., etc. 
Hours to be arranged. 

5 Hvaiene (2 Hrs.) The principles of hygiene and sanitation as 
they pertain to the welfare Of the individual, and the care of the pub- 
ic health: prevention of communicable diseases; heredity; eugenic. 

immunity; food, air and watet as source, ol disease; personal hygiene; 
school hygiene; occupational diseases: vital statist.cs. 
Second aemeater; lectures (36 hrs.), M. F.. 8:00. 

6 Research in Bacteriology. (Credit according to work done.) 
Open to limited number ol graduate atudenta in medicine 

7 State and Municipal Laboratory Methods. (2 Hrs.) Open <<> 
fourth year and graduate student* The diagnosis of typhoid, d.pi • 

h ,,ia. ',u.,,nu,osis. syphilis, gonorrhea, rablea, etc and bactono 1- 
oglc examination of water, milk, food. etc. Prerequisite: Barter,. 
3 or its equivalent 

Hours to be arranged. 

8 Immunity. (2 Hrs) Open to Benlott and uraduato stud- 
\ study Ol Immunity with laboratory work on animals: 

glatinatlon; toxins; preciptinaj imagocytoeis; anaphyla^a; coi 
ment fixation; and their appl l« and tn 

requisite: Bacteriology 8 and Pathology H 

Hours to bo arran 



262 West Virginia University Catalogue 

11. Laboratory Diagnosis. (2 Hrs.) A laboratory course in chem- 
ical, miscroscopic and bacteriologic examination of urine, feces, blood, 
gastric contents, etc., and their pathologic and clinical significance. 
Prerequisite: Bacteriology 3, and Physiological chemistry 10. 

Hours to be arranged. 

21. General Pathology. (6 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate 
students. The technique of tissue preparation, staining and mount- 
ing; disturbances of circulation and nutrition; inflammations; degen- 
erations; infiltrations; necrosis; infectious granulomas and tumors. 
Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory work. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
Prerequisites: Physiological chemistry; histology; physiology; ana- 
tomy and bacteriology. 

First semester; lectures (54 hrs.), M. W. F., 8:00; laboratory 
(162 hrs.) M. W. F., 2:00-5:00. 

22. Pathology of Infectious Granulomas and Tumors. (3 Hrs.) 
Open to seniors and graduate students. Continuation of Pathology 
21. Tuberculosis, syphilis, actinomycosis, blastomycosis, etc., and 
the benign and malignant tumors. A study of the pathology of special 
organs is made. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisite: Pathology 21. 

Second semester; lectures (18 hrs.), W., 11:00; laboratory (72 
hrs.), T. Th., 10:00-12:00. 

23. Advanced Pathology. (3 Hrs.) This course is open to a lim- 
ited number of students who have credit for Pathology 21. Special 
technique, autopsy work, pathological physicology. 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged. 

24. Research in Pathology. (Credit according to work done). 
Open only to graduates. 

25. Seminar in Pathology and Bacteriology, n Hr.) Review of 
current literature. For advanced students. 

Both semesters; S., 10:00. 



CHEMISTRY. 

Courses 1, 2, 9 and 18 in chemistry offered in the College of Arts 
and Sciences are required of students preparing to enter the School of 
Medicine. For detailed announcements of these courses see pages 75 
and 76. 

For courses in physiological chemistry see page 265. 

For courses in pharmaceutical chemistry see page 267. 



The Sch< 






PHARMACOLOGY. 
, r and Miss WmSTLUW 

40. Pharmacology. (2 Hrs.) This CO. 

prerequisite to all other reonired conrsei In phan 

UsLlch.Wo-physicalda,. 

Dical Information relating to Incompal '™- 

tion excretion, and fete in the tiSSU 

Fil last nine weeks, T. Th.. 3:00-5:30. 

42 Systematic Pharmacology. (3 Hrs.) * quired of second 

med ical stndenta Continnntlon ol 

covered is that outlined in Cushny's textbook, along with a CO! 

tion of some of the newer and non-official remedies. Pre* 
Physiology 2 and 4. 

First semester; T. Th. S., 8:00. 

41 Pharmacodynamics. (2 Hrs.) This cor. 
ond year medical students and consists of simple experiments 0] 
Cold-bk)Oded animals; more complex experiments with the h 
mammals: operative work upon cats and docs. LaboratOl 
■nd semester: If. P., 2:00-6:30. 
43. Systematic Pharmacology. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of 
4 2. Required of second year medical students. 
Second semester; M. W. F.. S:00. 

45. Special Pharmacodynamics. (Credit according to work done.) 
Open to advanced students and special workers who desire training 
in biological assay. 

Hours to be arranged; S W. 

46. Toxicology. (2 Hrs.) A course in which the toxic action of 
drags is considered from a medico-legal point of view, 
methods of diagnosing poisoning and the mode of conducting autopsies 
when the tissues are to be turned over to an analyst will be demon- 
strated. In the laboratory, special attention is given to the chief 

tification of the principal alkaloids. plu- Gal- 

lic and volatile poisons. 

Fii ~*er; hours to be ami ^ N 

47. Chemo-Therapy. A research course open only to - 
identS who have a knowledge of organic Cl Wd Wh< 

I German. 
Hours to be arrar. - 

48. Research in Pharmacology i D to those who have special 
qualifications for advanced work. 

Hours to be arrar.- 



264 Wl.sT VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY CATALOGUE 

PHYSIOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 
Professor SIMPSON, Associate Professor Morse and Miss Wiesti.ing. 

6. Physiology. (5 Hrs.) Open only to pharmacy students. A 
study of the functions of the different organs of the body, illustrated 
by demonstrations of human organs and those of lower animals, with 
a miscroscopic study of the most important tissues. A study of the 
dissected human body is made in the anatomical laboratory. One 
afternoon a week is given to laboratory work. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

First semester; M. T. Th. F., 10:00; W., 2:00-5:00; Professor Simp- 
son. 

1. Physiology. (5 Hrs.) Intended for college students who do not 
care to go into the details of medical physiology. Similar to course 
6, but a more advanced text is used. This course will meet the needs 
of teachers of public schools. Prerequisite: either physics or general 
chemistry. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

Second semester; M. T. Th. F., 11:00; M., 2:00-5:00; Professor 
Simpson. 

2. Physiology. (3 Hrs.) Required of first year medical students. 
A study of the blood, the organs of circulation, vasomotor nerves, 
respiration, digestion, internal secretion, nutrition, heat production, 
and reproduction. Prerequisite: Histology 12. 

Second semester; M. W. F., 2:00; Professor Simpson. 

3. Physiology. (5 Hrs.) A study of muscle, nerve, the central 
nervous system, and the special senses. Prerequisite: Physiology 2 
and Neurology 5. 

First semester; M. T. W. Th. F., 9:00; Professor Simpson. 

4. Physiology. (1 Hr.) Introductory laboratory course accom- 
panying course 2. Required of all first year students in the School of 
Medicine and prerequisite for Pharmacology 40. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Second semester; first nine weeks. T. Th., 2:00-5:00; Professor 
Simpson. 

5. Physiology. (1 Hr.) Required of second year medical students. 
This laboratory course supplements course 4, and completes 2 and 3. 
Each student makes complete records of each experiment. These are 
written up and the note books handed in at the end of the semester. 
The work covers blood pressure experiments on mammals, heart con- 
trol, respiration, digestion, nerve, muscle preparations and the special 
senses. Fee, $2.50. 

First semester; T. Th., 2:00-5:00; Professor Simpson. 






The S 

10 Physiological Chemistry. (3 II: 

V c nor..,:.! phvsu.loay . »t of th, 

such u ire commonly met wtth in clinical n 
r;l«tur^M 

r 

11 Physiological Chemistry. (3 Hi 
students. [nYOStlgatt I 

Hour, to be arranged; Pi 

IfOBfl 

PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS. 
Dr. 

31. Physical Diagnosis. (2 Hrs.) Required of second year medi- 
cal students- An introductory course in the study of the taKing of 
medical histories. Inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation 
of patients in health and disease. 

First semester; M. Th. F.. 10:00. 



MINOR SURGERY. 
Dr. Hardy and Associate Professor M< 

51 Minor Surgery and Operative Technique. (3 H») RW 
of -. ear medical students. Open to graduate students. In- 

struction by demonstrations and practice in the various manipula- 
tions of minor surgery. Including the application of splints and ban- 
ires and practical work in the principles of asepsis, an- 
and sterilization; preparation of patient and operator; dri 
and care of wounds. Practical instruction of individual I 
in the induction Ol local anesthesia. 

■ M . W. V Dr. HaaOT, City Hospital. 

52 Operative Surgery. A COOTS* of practical instrm Pera- 

otmalng the lower animals :1 bc 

maintained throughout the WOTk. 1 room ll 

work in the animal barn. 

r 



266 West Virginia University Catalogue 

COURSES IN DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

PHARMACY. 

Assistant Professor Bercy and Mr. . 

1. Theoretical Pharmacy. (2 Hrs.) Descriptive and experimental 
lectures and recitations, embracing a study of the apparatus and tech- 
nique necessary for the correct procedure in the manufacture of phar- 
maceutical preparations. (36 hours). 

First semester; T. Th., 9:00; Assistant Professor Bergy. 

2. Pharmaceutical Arithmetic and Stoichiometry. (3 Hrs.) Lec- 
tures and recitations. (50 hours.) 

First semester; M. W. F., 9:00; Assistant Professor Bergy. 

3. Physics of Pharmacy. (3 Hrs.) A laboratory course designed to 
accompany courses 1 and 2 in pharmacy. Quizzes and laboratory (100 
hours). Fee, $3.00. 

First semester; M. F., 2:00-5:00; Assistant Professor Bergy. 

4. Operative Pharmacy Lectures. (3 Hrs.) A systematic con- 
sideration of the various official preparations for which the Pharma- 
copoeia and National Formulary gives formulas and processes. Lec- 
tures and recitations (50 hours.) 

Second semester; M. F., 10:00; W. 8:00; Assistant Professor Bercy. 

5. Operative Pharmacy Laboratory. (4 Hrs.) This course is car- 
ried on in conjunction with Pharmacy 4. The representative classes 
of preparations of the Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary are 
manufactured. Students are required to pass an examination in the 
identification of these preparations by their physical characteristics. 
Laboratory (150 hours). Fee, $10.00. 

Second semester; W. Th. F., 2:00-5:00; Assistant Professor Bergy. 

» 

6. Manufacturing Pharmacy Lectures. (3 Hrs.) The more diffi- 
cult pharmaceuticals and miscellaneous preparations are considered in 
connection with the modern methods of manufacture. Lectures and 
recitations. (50 hours). 

First semester; M. F., 11:>00; W., 8:00; Assistant Professor Bergy. 

7. Manufacturing Pharmacy Laboratory. (3 Hrs.) The individual 
preparations are usually assigned in the form of a prescription and 
include those classes generally made extemporaneously. About sev- 
enty-five miscellaneous prescriptions are compounded and the exist- 
ing incompatabilities studied. Every prescription must be labeled and 
wrapped as in actual practice. Laboratory (100 hours) Fee $5.00. 

First semester; T. Th., 2:00-5:00; Assistant Professor Bergy. 



The School of Medicine 

8. Prescriptions and Incompatibilities. ( :: Hi.- ) T! • 

tion is studied relative to the Interpretation ol the chemical pharma- 
ceutical, and therapeutical Lncompatabilitles, 
Ing and Latin nomenclature. Lecture and recitations (50 Hn 
tester; It \v. r. 3:00; Mr. 

9. Assay and Pharmacopoeial Testing. A critical Btud? 
of the identity, purity, limit and percent of tin- pharma- 
copoeia as applied '<» all official organic and inorganic compounds. 

Hrs). Laboratory (50 Hrs). 
y W . B:00; T Tl 
Mr. 

10. Commercial Pharmacy. (2 Hrs.) The establishment, in..: 

ment, and derelopmenl of a modern pharmacy, with BpeciaJ empti 
on business economics, accounting, correspondence, - -hip and 

advertising. Lecture* and recitations (36 Hrs.). 

Second semester; \V. F 11:00; Mr. 



CHEMISTRY. 
Professor Clark and Assistant Prof* - v. 

32. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. (3 His.) A course dealing B] 

fically with inorganic chemistry as applied to pharn. 
metals, and their inorganic compounds, equation writing Btoichio- 
metry, etc.. are discussed. The modern methods of commercial man- 
ufacture of inorganic chemicals are < L The Btudentfl pre- 
pare a large number of inorganic chemicals in the laboratory section. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Second semester; T. Th., 8:00; laboratory. Th., 2:00-5:00: Mr. 
v. 

9. Organic Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) An elemental) 
tation course in which the classification, class real 
and properties of entire classes are considered. Bspeciallj ad..; 
to the student of pharmacy. 

First semes* r; II w. F„ 10:00; T. Th.. I : \kk 

36. Organic Chemistry. ( :; Hrs.) An advanced 0OU1 
with the synthesis, physical and chemical prop er ti es, actions and 

of a large number of organic compounds and animal | nth- 

introduced into therapeutl I primarily for th.- stud.-ir 

medicine and pharma 
requisite: Organic Chemist r. 

Sc« : M \v k.. 11;,. 



268 West Virginia University Catalogue 

37. Organic Analysis. (3 Hrs.) A lecture and laboratory course 
which has for its subject matter the chemistry, means of detection, 
and the qualitative analysis of the alkaloids and a few important 
synthetic drugs. Laboratory and quiz (100 hours). Fee, $5.00. 

Second semester; M. W., 2:00-5:00; Mr. 

38. Food and Drug Analysis. (2 to 5 Hrs.) A graded course of 
lectures and laboratory work with collateral reading. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 1, 2, 5, 26, 34. 

First semester; M. T. W. Th. F., 2:00-5:00; Mr. Bergy and Mr. 






39. Food and Drug Analysis. (2 to 5 Hrs.) A continuation of 
Chemistry 38. Analysis and practice in detecting adulteration in a 
large and varied number of preparations. 

Second semester; M. T. W. Th. F., 2:00-5:00; Mr. Bergy and Mr. 
Fee, $5.00. 

35. Organic Synthesis. (2 Hrs.) This laboratory course is parallel 
with Chemistry 34 and is designed especially for students of phar- 
macy and medicine. The course includes the preparation of some of 
the more important compounds in both the aliphatic and aromatic 
series. Wherever possible, compounds of pharmaceutic interest are 
prepared. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1, 2, 5 and 6. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Clark. 



BOTANY. 

Professor Sheldon and Mr. Spaxgler. 

3. General Botany. (4 Hrs.) This course includes a general survey 
of the various plant groups — algae, fungi, mosses, ferns, and seed- 
plants — with a consideration of their relation tc pharmacy. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. 

First semester; T. Th., or W. F., 8:00; Professor Sheldon, F.,; 
laboratory sections, M. Th., W. F., 2:0'0; T., 2:00, S.. 9:00: Mr. Spaxg- 
ler, F. 

4. Seed-Plants. (4 Hrs.) First half-semester; Morphology, physio- 
logy, ecology, and economic importance of seed-plants. Some field work 
is required. 

Second-half semester: Characteristics of the principal families 
of seed-plants; practice in identification and classification. A collec- 
tion is required. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Second semester; M. W., 9:00; Professor Sheldox, F..; laboratory 
sections, T. Th., 9:00-12:00; Mr. Spaxgler, F. 



Thk School op Mbdk 

microscopy. 

Mr. 



10. Microscopy. (1 Hrs ) A detailed study of the microscope and 
lOriea and their uses in the arts, sciences and industries, micro- 
scopical character^ adul- 
terants of powdered drug! and spic»-s. Lahoratory fee, $3.00. 

First semester; T. Th.. 10:00 to 12:00; S., 9:00. 

PHARMACOGNOSY AND MATERIA MEDICA. 
Mr. 

11. Pharmacognosy. (.", His.) Lecture! and recitations incl. 
official titles and definitions, families, constituents, actions, us» 

together with practical work in identification. Animal drills 
and their materia medica are considered here. In conclusion a short 
series of lectures on immunity, antitoxins, vaccinas, etc 
fitted for the students in pharmacy. 

First semester; M. T. \Y. Th. F., 9:00. 






THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



STAFF OF INSTRUCTION. 
FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M. LLI>. President of tl 
LOUIS BLACK, Din tor and E 

FREDERIC CURTIS BUTTERPLELD, 1 AB, Head of th> Fiona 

part mm t 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOOR Instructor in Piano 

BRACE martin SNEE, H.M.. Instructor m Piano 
MAX DONNER, Instructor in Violin <n »,/#• 

FLORA KAY HA' . Instructor in Theory and 

WALTER R. MESTRBZAT, Instructor in Wind Instruments 
LUCILE ware ELLIOTT, Assistant in Public Bchool 1 



BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT. 

The school occupies the upper floor of Woodburn Hall, which 
contains well appointed studios and practice rooms. A recital hall, 
seating 400 people, has been provided for lectures and students' 
recitals. 

Commencement Hall, seating 1,000 people, contains a m. 
cent three-manual pipe organ, tubular pneumatic— built up. 
universal wind-eh* - i and having j nd mecl 

A n. if Moller i 
added. This organ, which receh p from an electric motor, is 

available for j. 

The school is equipp.-.l • ;>- with Knal : in all. 

ten uprights and s mis. 



1 On leave of absence. With V U 
his work 



272 AVest Virginia University Catalogue 

CONCERTS AND RECITALS. 

Faculty concerts are given at least three times a year, the last of 
the yearly series being the Commencement concert. All the members 
of the School of Music Faculty participate in these concerts, though 
occasionally one member may give an individual recital. 

STUDENT CONCERTS. 
A student's concert is given each week. These concerts vary in 
grade from elementary to graduate and post-graduate recitals. The 
object is to afford opportunity for the students to apply in public the 
proficiency that has been developed in the studio. 

ARTISTS' CONCERTS. 

During each year several artists of international fame are en- 
gaged for recital and concerts; such artists as Rosenthal, Harold 
Bauer, Tina Lerner* Francis McMillan, Schumann-Heink, Frances 
Alda, David Bispham and others. 

These concerts are made easily accessible to students generally. 

THE CHORAL SOCIETY. 

The students of the University who can sing are admitted to the 
choral society upon payment of fifty cents, the membership fee. For 
those who are not students the fee is $1.00. 

Students, generally, are urged to ally themselves with the society 
on account of its educational value; to vocal students this work is 
especially valuable for it is the custom to have all the solo work done, 
as far as possible, by members of the society. The opportunity to 
sing roles in the Messiah and Elijah with orchestra is a most valu- 
able experience. 

THE UNIVERSITY PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA. 

A University orchestra of thirty-five members, composed of stu- 
dents and outside talent, is constituted as follows: 

First and second violins, violas, violincellos, contrabasses, flutes, 
oboes, trombones, drums, and all percussion instruments. 

An average of four concerts will be given each year in which 
members of the faculty and advanced students in piano, violin, voice, 
organ and other departments can appear as soloists. 

Rehearsals are held weekly. All advanced students in string 
and wind instruments are required to play in the orchestra and outside 
students of ability are also admitted on payment of a nominal fee. 

Students in composition may have their works rehearsed and 
preformed if found worthy, and students in conducting also have op- 
portunity for actual practice. 

This orchestra will afford the training and routine indispensable 
to the experienced orchestral player. 



The School of Mi 

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Students may enter the School ol Music hi any time but it i* 
greatly to their Interest to enter, ss far ss possible, at the beginning 
of the semester. 

Students entering within the first two 
be charged for full semester; after thai time, for the i r of 

the semester and one week additional. 

There is no deduction made for lessoni mil 
in case of prolonged Illness, when the loss le divided equall] 

itudenl and the school. 

Students Of the School of Music arc not allowed to take part in 
public programs or to join musical organizations without the cor. 
of their respective teachers and the director of the school. 

All music students are expected to attend the regular Btudi 
recitals, and to take part in them whenever •<!. and to attend 

all concerts given under auspices of the University. They ar. 
pected to identify themselves With the various organizations of the 
school, and are required to enter any of which they are assigned by 
the director. 

It is expected that all students will take sufficient work— literary 
or musical or both — to occupy their entire time. 

CREDIT FOR MUSIC ON COLLEGE COURSES. 

Credit towards the degree of Bachelor of Arts will D for 

courses in the theory and the history of music, not to exceed fifteen 
semester hours. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

The School of Music offers instruction in the following subjects: 
voice, piano, violin, organ, accompanying, chamber music, orche- 
band inn- Pending, public school music, harmony, counterpoint, 

canon and FugUO, and history of music. In voice, piano and violin I 
courses are offered, one of thn tifi- 

cate. and one of four years, leading to an artist's diploma. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

No student can be classified in the collegiate course In n 

without passing an examination in solfeggio, or demonstrating to the 
satisfaction of the head of the department the ability to read music 
of moderate difficulty, and giving I v:d< n< e Of the mastery of 
elements of music. 

In the preparatory course, to which children onlj 
no previous know;. music is requin 



27 1 West Virginia Txivfrsity Catalogue 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS. 

Candidates for a teacher's certificate in any of the three courses 
mentioned above must present a high school diploma or equivalent 
credits. They must also complete courses 1, 2, 3 and 4 in theory of 
music, and courses 5 and 6 in history of music, and show satisfactory 
proficiency in ensemble work. 

Candidates for an artist's diploma must meet all the requirements 
imposed for the teacher's certificate and appear satisfactorily in a 
graduating recital. 

VOICE. 

Candidates for the teacher's certificate in voice, in addition to 
the above general requirements, must satisfactorily complete the 
three-year course in voice as outlined below, and must possess the 
ability to perform acceptably selections from the standard orators 
and operas. They must also complete one year of work in each of 
the modern languages — French, German and Italian, and two years 
of piano. 

Candidates for the artist's diploma in voice must satisfy all the 
requirements for the teacher's certificates, and must complete the 
fourth year's work in voice. 

PIANO. 

Candidates for the teacher's certificate in piano, in addition to 
the general requirements, must satisfactorily complete the three- 
year course outlined below. They must also complete the course in 
ensemble playing. 

Candidates for the artist's diploma in piano must satisfy all the 
requirements for the teacher's certificate and must complete the 
fourth year's work in piano. A graduating recital must be given, part 
of which program shall consist of a standard concerto for piano-forte 
and orchestra. i 

VIOLIN. 

Candidates for the teacher's certificate in violin must satisfac- 
torily complete the three-year course in violin music as outlined 
below, including the concertos of Viotti, Rode and Kreutzer, and the 
lighter works of some modern composer. They must also have some 
knowledge of piano playing. 



The School of Mi 

Candidate! tor the artisfa diploma, In add 
quired for u ' yollr 

work In violin mUSiC and give B graduate 

tog ne sonata or concerto, one trio or onarfc 

NOTE Students desiring to become candidate 
or diplomas should aote thai while the above i 
referred to as three-year and four-year i oo defini 

Ume can b e assigned for their compleUon. in all i 
aml diplomas are awarded on the basia of the proficiency * 
rather than ou the length of time < : . 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

didates tor the Bupen In public school d 

must satisfactorily complete the course In public 

Indicated below. A high school diploma or equivalei 

requisite. 

Required Course. 64 Hours. 

10 hours Harmony 
8 hours Musical History 

6 hours Public School Music (Material and Methods) 
6 hours Public School Music (Sight Reading and Dictation) 
2 hours Public School Music (Practice Teaching) 

►UTS Education (Education 4 and 5) 
6 hours Piano 
6 hours Voice 
2 hours Accompanying 

Electives. 

Polk dancing, physical training, English or modern I 

Twelve hours of electives must be ottered to make 64 how 
quired for certificate. 



276 West Virginia University Catalogue 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

Strict adherence to a fixed list of studies is not required. The 
needs of the individual student are considered and the studies varied 
accordingly. An idea of the work covered in the different classes 
may be obtained from the following: 



VOICE. 

Mr. Black. 

First Grade — Technique; scales, arpeggios, etc.; vocalises, Panofka 
and Concone, Vaccai and Marchesi in Italian. Simple songs in Italian 
and English. 

Second Grade — Technique; scales, Lutgen, Concone, Lamperti, 
Panofka, etc. Vannucini in Italian; songs in Italian and English. 
Ensemble; duets, trios and quartets. 

Third Grade — Technique; Dona, Lutgen, Concone, Bordogni, etc. 
Arias from standard grand operas and oratorios. Ensemble. 

Fourth Grade — Technique; Bona, Lamperti, Concone, Aprile, etc. 
Graduation recital program. 



PIANO. 

Mr. Butterfield, Mrs. Black, Mrs. Snee and Miss Moore. 

To develop a love for and a knowledge of the best in the litera- 
ture for pianoforte is the aim of this department. The varied needs 
of the individual student are carefully observed by each instructor; 
with the cooperation of the pupil, actual ability in playing and all 
round musicianship are readily acquired. 

The course required of candidates for the teacher's certificate or 
the artist's diploma, comprises all forms of technical exercises, scales, 
arpeggios, double thirds, octaves, studies by Czerny, Cramer and Cle- 
menti. 

In order that the students may form a comprehensive idea of the 
literature of the pianoforte they are required to have studied a reper- 
toire of five pieces by each of the following composers: Bach, Scar- 
latti, Handel, Mozart, Bethoven, Schubert, Weber, Mendelssohn, 
Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Rubinstein, Grieg, Moskowski, MacDowell, 
Rachmaninoff, and Debussey. 



The School of Mi bic 

VIOLIN. 
Mr. M \x DOB 
Elementary. Scales and finger exercise*. School.- and 

Danda, de Beriot, Keyser, Leonard Dont, etc. 

Solos by de Beriot, David, Dancla, i 

To pass from the elementary Into the Intermed 
factory performance of the Accolay Cone I am. la i 

Intermediate. Scales and arpeggl in thr« ■• M by 

Erentier, Piorillo, and Caprice* by Rode. 

Concertos and SOlOC Mozart E flat major: Viof • 

zer No. 19; Rode No. 7. g; de B< ridt Mo 6, 7. 9; Beethoven Romances, 

etc. 

Advanced Soloist Course. 3 and arpeggl in thn . 

Studies and Caprices D] ' orillo, Kreutzer. VleUXtem] 

Bach, and PaganinL 

Concertos and Solos. Spohr 2nd and 8th; Viotti 22nd: Bach, I 
conne. Concerto in E major: Wieniawski 2nd; Mendelssohn, Bruch, 
Beethoven. Vieuxtemps No. 5: Saint-Saens B minor, and Paganlnl. 

NOTE. — All advanced pupils are required to participate in the 
rehearsals of the orchestra. nnleSf illy excused, and play in the 

Ensemble and String Quartet c! 

PREPARATORY PIANO. 

The School of Music offers a well organised preparatory < 
in piano and violin. The beginner's course has two lessons a week 
after school hours. Pupils generally remain in thif 

PIPE ORGAN. 
Mrs, Sm i . 

The organ course is extended to provide a thorough and com- 
plete preparation for the work of a church organist and accompanist 

A certain facility at the piano and in Blght-readlng is : 
before this work is taken up. 

Stainer's Organ Primer, with si" :;tl studies and hymn 

playing comprise the preparatory work. 

Kink's Organ School. Buck's studies in Phrasing and the works 

of Bach, Mendelssohn. Cuilmanr . round- 

work of study through the coir 



278 West Virginia University Catalogue 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

Miss Ei. i. ion. 

This course is intended for those contemplating the teaching of 
music in public schools, and will deal with the presentation of music 
from the kindergarten through the high school. It will include a 
study of the development of tone and rhythm in the different grades, 
of the songs and material suitable for each grade, of the care of the 
child's voice and the material for chorus and orchestra work in high 
school and also of sincing games suitable for play-ground, gymnasium 
and school room. 

WOOD AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS. 

Mr. Mestrezat. 

Opportunity is offered in this course to obtain the instruction 
necessary to fit one to play the various wood-wind and brass instru- 
ments used in orchestras and bands. 

ENSEMBLE. 
Mr. DONNER. 

1. Lessons in Accompanying. This course is intended to furnish 
opportunity to advanced students to acquire the art of accompanying 
songs, violin and cello solos. 

2. Chamber Music. The study of sonatas, trios and string quar- 
tets by Hayden, Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Handel, Mendelssohn, Gade, 
Greig, etc. Open to violinists, cellists, pianists and viola players. A 
preparatory class is also offered, the work to be studied including 
trios by Reinecke, Bohm, Hayden, Hellmsberger, Schubert and Weber. 

3. Orchestra Music. A study of the usual orchestral works and 
of accompaniments of pianoforte and violin concertos. 

THEORY OF MUSIC. 

Miss Hayes. 

NOTE: Fifteen hours of the following courses may be offered 
for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

1. Harmony. (5 Hrs.) Intervals. Scale and melody writing. Con- 
struction of the period. Triads, inversions, chord connections in three 
and four parts, cadences, chord of the seventh. Modulation. 

First semester; 9:00; 47 W. 



The S 

2. Harmony. (5 Hrs.) Harmonising of melodJ 

use of triads, dominant, dimu 

with inversions. In 

: \Y 

3. Counterpoint. (6 His.) Single m< 

wide haps. Counterpoint in one, two. three, four and BlOTi 

of rhythmic movement Modula- 
Motive development Prerequisite: Harmony l ai 
Fir.- 11:00; 17 V 

4. Form and Analysis. (6 Hrs • Chord reading. Primary i 

«n in various Intervals. Chamber music, oratorios and sympho- 
nies. The fuiiue form T rm. Romantic an and 
modern form- oration. 

Second semester; 11:00; it yv. 

5. History of Music. (4 Hrs if the history 
of music. Drill in the pronunciation of names. Ancient music. < 

sic music. 

First semester: M. T. Th. F.. 10:00; 47 W. 

6. History of Music, (1 Hrs.) Music of the nineteenth century 
and present day topics. Romantic period in composition and Op 
Modern period. Recent opera and oratorio. Critics and criticism. 
Present state of music. Twentieth century co: 

of period- -uctor and cl 

ond semester; If. T. Th.. l 

SUMMER SCHOOL. 

The Vr. Summer School begins each year at th 

the second semester (about J . 
members of the Music School Faculty are in residence for the first 

weeks and offer courses of special interest to th 
can attend only in summer, for particular pains is taken to cover all 
the ground possible in six weeks and the com study are arra: 

with that end in view. 



280 * West Virginia University Catalogue 

TUITION. 

The following table shows the rates of tuition for private lessons 
of thirty minutes in length: 

Lessons per Week 

Voice One Two Three 

Mr. Black $30.00 $50.00 $60.00 

Piano 

Mr. Butterfield 30.00 50.00 60.00 

Mrs. Black 30.00 50.00 60.00 

Mrs. Snee 20.00 30.00 

Miss Moore 20.00 30.00 

Elementary piano 12.00 a sem. 

Violin 

Mr. Donner 25.00 40.00 55.00 

Elementary violin 14.00 20.00 

Intermediate violin 18.00 21.00 

Pipe Organ 

Mrs. Snee 30.00 50.00 

Wood and Brass Instruments 

Mr. Mestrezat 14.00 20.00 

Public School Music 

Material and Methods 

Miss Elliott 1 hour lessons 12.00 

Sight Reading and Dictation 

Miss Bunce 1 hour lessons 8.00 

Ensemble 

Mr. Donner 20.00 a sem. 

Theory: Class daily, one hour 

Harmony, Analysis ®r Counterpoint— 20.00 a sem. 
Musical History 16.00 a sem. 

Piano for practice, one hour a day, will be furnished at $6.00 a 
semester; two hours a day at $10.00 a semester; three hours a day 
at $14.00 a semester; four hours a day at $18.00 a semester. 

Pipe organ practice, one hour a day, $10.00 a semester. 

Students whose work is wholly in the School of Music pay only 
tuition. 

Students who register in the School of Music and take University 
work not required in the music courses are subject to the usual Uni- 
versity fees except the athletic fee. 

French 1 and 2, German 1 and 2, Italian 1 and 2, and Education 
4 and 5 are required in the music courses. 






THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

SHOUT TERM, six WEEKS, JUNE 23 TO AUG1 Bl I ' 

TEEM. TWELVE WEEKS, JUNE iPTEMBl 19. 



THE FACULTY. 
FRANK BUTLER TROTTER. A.M. LLP.. Preside*! 

WAITMAX BARBE, A.M.. Lni I) i Dir 5 r School, and 

Professor of English in U I, English Lir>>-it.. 

CHARLES HENRY AMBLER, Ph.D.. Pr 

EDGAR LEWIS AXDKKW r of Poultry I 

banclry in the 1'iiivt rsitj ), Poultry Hu^ 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTKOXC, AT.. L.H.D.. | 

Language and Literature in the University ; Literati 

LOXXA DENNIS ARNETT, Ph.D.. (Librarian of the Unii 

Library > 

IXA GRACE BARNES, AM.. (Training Teacher in th >d High 

School), Rural Education 

ETHEL BORDEX BLACK, loire 

LOUIS PLACE, i Director University School of 

MARY O. BRANTS, i critic Teacher in Chicago Norma - 
vai • >'. Fifth 'U\<1 Bixt) 

LUCIUS MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D., (Associate Prof- 
in the Unirersity), B one logy 

sample BOARDMAN BROWN, am. (Professor of Geology in the 
Unirers pay 

LEO CAStLIN, A.B., LL.B.. (Assistant Pro: 

ALFRED COPELAXD CALLEN, EM. MS - of 

Mining ing in the Unirersity), Mining 



~ v - West Virginia University Catalogue 

CHARLES BENTON CANNADAY, A.M., (Professor of Latin in the 
University), Latin 

FREDERIC DANIEL CHEYDLEUR, Ph.D., (Assistant Professor of 
Romance Languages in the University), French. 

GRACE COVEY, (Supervisor of Music in the Parkersburg, W. Va., City 
Schools), Public School Music 

JOHN HARRINGTON OOX, A.M., (Professor of English Philology in 
the University), English Literature. 

HENRY STODDARD CURTIS, Ph.D., (Secretary Playground Associa- 
tion of America), Education 

MARIE DEVERE, B.S., (Instructor in Home Economics in Ohio State 
University, Home Economics 

ANDREW JACKSON DADISMAN, M.S., Agr., (Associate Professor of 
Farm Management in the University), Farm. 

MAX DONNER, (Head of the Violin Department in the School of Music 
in the University), Violin and Ensemble. 

CARRIE B. EDMONDSON, (Critic Teacher in Northern Illinois State 
Normal School), Observation Classes, Seventh and Eighth Grades 

JOHN ARNDT EIESLAND, Ph.D., (Professor of Mathematics in the 
University), Mathematics 

ANNA JEAN GANNETT, (Critic Teacher in the Lincoln School of 
Teachers College, Columbia University), Observation Classes First, 
Second and Third Grades 

GLADYS GRIMSHAW GILL, B.S., (Instructor in Home Economics in 
the University), Home Economics 

GRACE M. GRIFFIN, A.B., (Supervisor of Physical Training in the 
Public Schools of Helena, Mont.), Physical Education for Wom.en; 
School Plays and Games for Children 

LILLIAN HACKNEY, A.B., (Head of the Department of Mathematics 
of Marshall College), Mathematics 

THOMAS PORTER HARDMAN, M.A., Jur. Dr., (Associate Professor 
of Ldw in the University), Laiv 

SIMEON THOMPSON HART, M.E., (Assistant Professor of Machine 
Construction in the University), Machine Shop 



Tin Si mmii; S< 

MA1-DM. HAVMAN (8 Dp rvis.,r of Pnbl - * IrttagtM. 

N J.), /'"''•' 

FIOUV RAY HAYBfi Instructor in Theor* •** 

VU) ^l nool of Music) 

M M I 

LBS1 IE I) XVII) HAYES, UK, : -' D *** a,l<1 ' 

structlon in the University), tfecft«ilca1 Dm 

HUBERT hill. Ms. (Assistant I bemlstry in the Unl- 

1 1 ru 

LAWRENCE BEHJAMIN HILL. A.M.. I 

Uon In th- University), Educai 
HARRISON RANDALL hint. L...H. (Instroci »« '»- 

University), I 

DAVID HALL JOHNSON. A M . I \ >« BllglWl in tin 

University) . /><■ uosition 

OHARLE N JOLLIFFE (Instructor in Physics in 

University), P/r- 
HENRY ALBERT JONES, PH.D., I Professor of 

in the University). UortvuVi 
HENRY CRAIG JON LL L . (Dean of the College of Li 

g aS., (Y n, Ohio. ' 

teocMng 
graphy 

BENJAMIN TOWNE LELAND, AM. I H f UuUx< - 

I Education In tin slty), I*du*tr1a Wo* 

WITHROW MORSE, Ph.D.. I WT of Physiology 

Physlolog mtetry In the University), /' : < «»'> * { " : 

and Sanitation 

SAMUEL mollis. Ms. (Assistanl the 

Unlven wriitry 

EDMUND NLIL. AM . a >r ol Pnl Un* In tlK Unlver- 

sity). Pubii< Bpeaktog 

LEONARD MARION PEAIRS, : ' B A . . I Pi - r I Enl ■ I 

• mology 



284 . West Virginia University Catalogue 

RAYMOND EGBERT SEAMAN, (Instructor in Woodworking in the 
University), Woodworking and Pattern Making 

JAMES WIGGIN SIMONTON, A.B., (Professor of Law in the Univer- 
sity), Law 

OTTO WELTON SNARR, A.B., (Graduate Student, University of 
Chicago), Education 

GRACE MARTIN SNEE, (Instructor in Pipe Organ in the University 
School of Music), Pipe Organ 

J. DUNCAN SPAETH, Ph.D., (Professor of English in Princeton Uni- 
versity). English. • 

MADISON STATHERS, Ph.D., (Professor of Romance Languages in 
the University), French and Spanish 

FORREST WILBUR STEMPLE, M.S., (Associate Professor of Agro- 
nomy in the University), Agronomy 

JAMES RUSSELL TROTTER, LL.B., Ph.D., (Professor of Law in the 
University), Law. 

RUFUS ASA WEST, (Instructor in Metalworking in the University), 
Metalworking 

CHARLES H. WINKLER, Ph.D., (Professor of Agricultural Education 
in the University), Agricultural Education; Nature Study 

JOHN JONATHAN YOKE, B.S., (Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry in the University), Animal Husbandry 

WILLIAM OXLEY THOMPSON, LL.D., President of Ohio State Univer- 
sity, will deliver the Summer School Convocation Address, Wednes- 
day, June 25, at 11:00 A. M. 

CHARLES M. BREGG, dramatic critic of the Pittsburgh Gazette-Times 
will give one or two lectures on the Drama. 

THE COBURN PLAYERS, will give two Shakespearean plays. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC FACULTY, under the direction of Louis 
Black, will give a series of weekly musical recitals during the first 
six weeks of the session. These recitals will be free. 

THE UNITED STATES BUREAU OF EDUCATION, will send a repre- 
sentative to give a series of lectures on Americanization Through 
the Schools. 



Tin; simmiic School 

PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

The purpose of these preliminary announcement 
sion of the University Summer Sch.x.i ; Information 

composition of the faculty, the BUB ' ° r 

fees and b, and, In I J way, U and pi D 

school. About the middle of April Detailed Announcement* will be 
printed, containing definite statement! of all of the courses, the 

amount of credit for each course and much other information 

of the I»- Dnouneementi may be had hy writing to the Director 

of the Summer School. 

The twenty-first session of the Summer School 
University will be-in June 23, 1919, and will continue for twelvi 
— to September i on will be divided into two term 

weeks each. Credit may also be had for nine ar- 

rangement with the Instructoi of the courses will I 

during the fir ks only. 

The extension of the Summer School to twelve weeks Is for the 
purpose of meeting the needs of the times. College Students and 
teachers desiring to complete their collef to prepare them- 

tter for their profession, will appreciate the greatly incre 
opportunities offered by tl :on. 

The College of Law will have a summer session, for the first time 
in many years. It will last for twelve weeks and instruction will be 
given by at least four members of the law faculty. 

The College of Agriculture and the College of Engineering, as w. 11 
the College of Arts and Sciences, will also be in session for tv. • 
weeks. 

PRACTICAL COURSES FOR TEACHERS. 

The Regents of the University think that the Summer School of 
the State University, in addition to offering its regular college com 

ought to serve the rank and file of I both rural and city. ir. 

most practical and efficient way p that the Summer School 

ought to give ail sue!: kind of Instruction that will en 

them at once to do },■ pfc in their DP 'his end the 

School offers courses by cmim 

thods of teaching reading. creoL-raphy. arithmetic, hi 

public school drawing, public BChOOl music, nature study, composition in 

the public schools, manual training, don 

for children and indeed in en .1 work 

school teaching. 



286 West Virginia University Catalogue 

MEETING THE TWENTY HOURS REQUIREMENT IN EDUCATION. 

The Summer School offers the best opportunity for high school 
teachers to meet the West Virginia State requirement of twenty hours 
in education. Many teachers lack only a part of this requirement— in 
the Short Term of six weeks they may make up six hours and in the 
Full Term of twelve weeks twelve hours. 

ADMISSION. 

There are no requirements for admission to the Summer School 
unless the student desires University credit for the work to be done. 
In such cases he must satisfy his instructors that he is prepared to 
take the courses selected. If he desires regular classification he must 
meet the regular University requirements for admission, a statement 
of which may be found in the University catalogue. 

FEES. 

The entire fee for everything offered in the Summer School (ex- 
cepting private instruction in music) is $5.00, whether the student be 
a resident of West Virginia or of some other state, provided that Uni- 
versity credit for summer work is not desired. If University credit 
for the work is desired, a matriculation fee of $5.00 must be paid, un- 
less the student is already a matriculate of % the University. 

Students from states other than West Virginia who desire to ob- 
tain University credit for the summer work will pay also a tuition fee 
of $10.00. 

If, however, no University credit is desired, the total fee for stu- 
dents from other states, as well as from West Virginia, will be only 
$5.00. This statement applies, of course, to all students desiring certi- 
ficates for the work done in the Summer School. 

Small laboratory fees, depending upon the courses taken, are 
charged in some of the laboratory courses. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS. 
For Women. 

Miss Susan Maxwell Moore, Dean of Women, has charge of the 
living accommodations for women students in the Summer School. 

Room and board in Women's Hall and Women's Hall Annex costs 
from $6.00 to $6.50 a week, payable for six or twelve weeks in advance. 
The young women furnish their own sheets and pillowslips. (For 
laundering these there is a charge of seventy-five cents for six weeks 
and $1.50 for twelve weeks). 



Tin: Sr\i\n:i! SCHOOL 






rable rooms and board mas ha obtained In the tanned 
hborhood of Women's Hall as well ai In other parts ol U 
The coal at private boarding houses Is usually a little more than li 

at the Hall. 

it is highly desirable, though of course aoi abaoluti 
to en^au-e living accommodations early. Write ><> 
well Moor.'. Dean of Women, Morgantown, w • 

full information and t< rooms and board, either in the Hall <>t 

out of it. 

All women students are requested to make Women's Hall 
Wllley Street, headquarters upon their arrival. Dean Moore ami her 
assistants will see that they are provided with living accommodate 
if the committee should tall to meet Incoming Btudents at the 
they should reporl at the Hall. Loop Btreel cars go directly from 

railway stations to the Hall. 

For Men. 

in private bomes, room rent ranges from $1.25 to $2.50 a ' 

Board may ho had in private boarding houses at from n"».00 to $6" 

;. Hoard and room together run from $6.50 to $8.00 a we<^k. Men 
tmmodations Bhould ad >hn C. Hupp. E 

M. C. a.. Morgantown, West Virginia, Btating kind of place wan 

locality desired, and price they are willit 

Prospective Summer School students are orged to write directly 
either to Miss Moore or Mr. Hupp ahout rooming and boarding act 

modatlons rather than to the i t of the University or to 

•or of the Summer School. 

CREDITS. REPORTS. AND CERTIFICATES. 

Entrance Credit dll may be had for most of the Sum- 

mer courses. The amount of credit will be found 

course in the Detailed Announcements, ready about April 15 

Only regularly matriculated students may nee Summer School 
credits t<> count toward a degree at Weal Virginia University, hut all 

others who do the work of the Summer School courses ami tak. 

min itions in them will rec< 
in any othor way they may like. 

A 1 ! whether those of matriculated DniV( 

of Otters, will be mailed to tip 

of tb.3 twelve weeks I 

Students who do not work for grades will the following 

Certificate by applying to the Director of the Summer SchO 

leaving Morgantown: 



288 West Virginia University Catalogue 

"This is to certify that attend- 
ed the Summer School of West Virginia University, 1919, for 

weeks and pursued the following 

courses:" 

The work of the students attending the Summer School for the 
purpose of renewing their teachers' certificates will be reported di- 
rectly to the State Department of Schools, by the Director of the Sum- 
mer School. 

COUPON OF CREDIT. 

For regular work in the Summer School for six weeks, a "Coupon 
of Credit" may be obtained which will entitle the holder to an increase 
of 11.00 a month in his salary as a teacher. Particulars may be ob- 
tained by writing to the Department of Schools, Charleston, W. Va. 

EXCUSE FROM INSTITUTE ATTENDANCE. 

By an act of the last session of the West Virginia Legislature, 
public school teachers who attend an approved summer school are 
excused from attendance at county teachers' institutes. 

RENEWAL OF TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES. 

By act of the Legislature of West Virginia, holders of first-grade 
teachers' certificates may obtain a second renewal of such certificate 
by studying for six weeks in an accredited summer school. By doing 
satisfactory work in three courses (classes), wholly professional or 
partly professional and partly academic, in the University Summer 
School, this requirement may be met. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

All text-books needed may be obtained at the University bookstore, 
in Martin Hall. 

DETAILED ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Detailed announcements giving full information concerning all 
of the courses offered, and other features of the Summer School, will 
be issued about April 15, and may be had upon request. Letters of 
inquiry will be answered with pleasure. Address the Director of the 
Summer School. 

WAITMAN BARBE, Morgantown, W. Va. 






THE DIVISION OF MILITARY 
SCIENCE AND TACTICS 



THE FACULTY. 

FRANK BUTLKK TROTTER, A M . LL.I) . V ' th- U* 

HARLAN L. Ml' MM A. Mc 
of Milit ■ | 

DONALD J. MYKRS. Captain Infantry f S A . l**i$t*nt Professor of 
Military 5 

JOHN H. RANDOLPH. 1st Lieut. Infantry U B. A. AttiffOfll 

sor of Milita 

West Virginia University being one of the beneficiaries of the Act 
of Congress of 1862, instruction in military tactics is made compulsory 
for the freshman and sophomore years. 

The Division is in charge of an officer of the United States Army, 
detailed by the War Department, as professor of military science and 
tactics. The Cadet Corps is inspected once each year by an off. 
of the General Staff of the Army and several times during each year 
by the District Military Inspector. 

An Infantry Unit. Senior Division, of the Reserve Officers' Train- 
ing Corps was established by the War Department on December 12, 
1916. 

All cadets are required to wear a neat appearing uniform at drill. 
This uniform may be worn with propriety on all occasions. It is fur- 
nished by the Government. 

All cadets tare divided into classe- -'ate cadets and volun- 

teer cadets. 

State cadets are those who receive appointment under the pro- 
ms of the act of the legislature of the State 
D below. 

Volunteer cadets are all other cadets belonging to the cadet corps 
of the Unive: 



290 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Extract from Chapter Forty-five of the Code of West Virginia. 

Section 140. Military Training. Male students of suitable age in 
the university shall be required, under such regulations as the state 
board of education shall prescribe, to enroll in the department of 
military science. Said students shall serve for the time required by 
said regulations and shall be entitled to such special privileges and 
immunities as the state board of education may determine. The state 
board of education shall have authority to accept appropriations, ma- 
terial and other benefits from the Federal Government on account of 
any federal law providing for aid to the West Virginia University for 
giving instruction in military science and to co-operate as far as prac- 
ticable with the Federal Government for such purpose. 

REQUIRED WORK IN MILITARY SCIENCE. 

The following order has been adopted by the State Board of 
Regents: 

Ordered that all male students, with the exceptions hereinafter 
named, enroll themselves in the Division of Military Science and 
follow diligently the course of instruction provided therein. Profi- 
ciency in this course shall be required for graduation. 

Practical and theoretical instruction shall be given four hours 
per week throughout the school year to all students except those in 
the advanced class who will be required to take five hours per week. 
A credit for one hour shall be given for each semester's work satis- 
factorily completed. Such credit shall be included in the computation 
of the student's standing at the end of each semester. 

Every student enrolled in the Department of Military Science, 
whether he holds a cadet appointment or not, shall at the time of his 
enlistment deposit with the financial secretary of the University $10.00 
to cover any loss or damage of books or government property occas- 
ioned through fault or neglect on the part of the cadet. This sum 
will be refunded to cadet at expiration of school term upon presenta- 
tion to financial secretary of certificate of property clearance. 

The following classes of students shall not be required to enroll 
themselves in the Military Division, but may elect to do so: 

(1) All students who are citizens of a foreign country and do not 
intend to become citizens of the United States. 

(2) All students who at date of entrance in the University are 
more than twenty-three years of age. 

(3) All graduate students. 

(4) All students whose studies are entirely in the School of Music. 

(5) All students who are taking only the short course, or the 
special winter course, or agricultural extension work in the College 
of Agriculture. 



Mli.lTAK - 






(6) All Students who aiv (hi- 
nd all Wh0 Dl 
miliUirv di\ ision. 

C) Ail Btudenta who ere physically unable to perform mini 

dutv. 

A hoard, to be known as the milit . 

.andant the din 

training an«i « Of th< 

lidenl Thia board shall act upon claims for exemption n 
military - 

Students who claim exemption under an> 

within seven r their registration in th<- 

to the commandant, in writing, the:: 

failure to make the request within -hall bar 

dent from claiming exemption. 

Applicants for exemption on the -round of physical disability 

shall be carefully examined b> >n of the cor. - of one 

dollar to be paid to the examining surgeon shall be charged for such 
lination. 

Students exempted under the seventh case shall, upon recom 
dation of the military and gymnasium board be required to register 
for such physical training as they can take until they have earned 
a credit equal to that driven for the prescribed military- work. 

In none of the preceding cases shall a student absent himself 
until his application has been acted upon. 

-hall be the duty of the commandant to notify the chairman 
of the committee on uion and grades whether the military 

an ,i mi board exempts a student or recommends that h- 

required to register for other work in place of military drill. 

ption shall no lo: 
be the duty of the student to present himself for drill at the 
drill period. 

Students m; I from the decision of the commanda: 

cadets or the militar;. urn board, in which case the appeal 

11 be decided by the council of administration. 
All cadet officers taking military instruction SI >ball 

s to their tuition fees, on the l 



~ 92 West Virginia University Catalogue 

SPECIAL REWARDS FOR MILITARY 
EXCELLENCE. 

The names of the most distinguished cadets of the graduating 
class are sent to the Adjutant General of the Army and to the Ad- 
jutant General of the State. 

All graduates of the Military Division are eligible, within five 
years after graduation, to commissions as first lieutenants in the 
Organized Militia of the State, without examination. 

The State Board of Regents offers the following medals as special 
rewards for excellence in military training: 

(1) To the cadet having the highest record for shooting on the 
University Rifle Team, a gold medal; (2) To the cadet having the 
second highest record for shooting on the University Rifle Team, a 
silver medal; (3) To the cadet having the highest, aggregate score at 
Company Team Rifle Competition, a gold medal; (4) To the cadet 
having the record for Military Training and Discipline, a gold medal; 
(5) To the cadet who shall write the best essay on preparation against 
war, fifty dollars. 

ARMORY. 

The Armory (60 by 120 feet) is used as a drill hall during inclem- 
ent weather. This building is the home of the cadet corps, and all 
entertainments given by them are held therein, under the supervision 
of the commandant of cadets. 

ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION. 

For the purpose of administration and drill the cadet corps is 
organized as a Battalion of infantry: Field, Staff, Band, and four 
companies. 

The work in military science is taken in connection with other 
University work, and requires about four hours each week. The 
course of instruction is intended to fit all who graduate therein to 
perform efficiently the duties of officers in the Officers' Reserve 
Corps, the Organized Militia of West Virginia, or of volunteers. The 
winter months are devoted to theoretical instruction in tactics and 
other military subjects, together with practical instruction in drill 
and in gallery practice. 

BAND. 

Band cadets are volunteer cadets. They receive the same allowance 
as state cadets and are governed by the same rules and regulations. 
They are instructed in military drill to include the school of the 
soldier and of the squad. 



MlI.ITAK: - 

INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS FOR APPOINT- 
MENT TO THE CADET CORPS. 

1. The applicant must not be urn:- 

H€ must be a bona f: . 

3. He must be MHUld physically and ot good moral charac- 

I, I!-- mutt deposit 110.00 with the financi. Uni- 

ny damage or loaa ot" books or L'overnment prop 
occasioned by the neglect on the part of th< 

~. He la allowed tree stationery ami the us»« of texl booki to th^ 
value of $1". on a year. He pays do matriculation, tuition, or contin- 
gent fees to the University. If he gradual 
of the University while a member of the cadet cor; 
to retain his text-books. 

6. The work of the »t interfere with the stu : 

scholastic dir may take courses in any of the departBU 

of the University. 

7 Students who desire cadet appointments should upon th^ir ar- 
rival at the University present themselves at the office of the com- 
mandant, in the armory, and obtain the necessary informat; 

-tering. etc. 

8. Any cadet who is absent without "leave for more than ten 
will forfeit his appointment, and will be dropped from the rolls. He 
cannot re-enter the University without special permission. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The following courses in military science and tactics are of:' 
All instruction is under the supervision of the commandant of 
dets who : ■ 1 by the senior cadet offi< 

COURSE OF TRAINING FOR INFANTRY UNITS OF THE 
SENIOR DIVISION. 

1. Military art. Three hours a week (counting 14 ur. 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. Physical drill (Manual of Ph; 
Training— Koehler) ; Infantry drill (U. B. Infantry Drill Regulation*) 
to include the School of the Soldier. Squad and Company, close and 

nded order. Preliminary instruction Sighting position and 
ing drills, gallery practice, nomenclature and care of rifle and equip- 
ment. 

(b) Theoretical, Weight i. Theory of • 

ual and collective (use of landaca] ts made up by u. s Mili 

tary Disciplinary Barracks. Fort I military or- 



294 West VIRGINIA University Catalogue 

ganization, (Tables of Organization); map reading; service of secur- 
ity; personal hygiene. 

2. Military art. Three hours a week (counting 14 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. Physical drill (Manual of Physical 
Training— Koehler) ; Infantry drill (U. S. Infantry Drill Regulations), 
to include School of Battalion, special attention devoted to fire di- 
rection and control; ceremonies; manuals (Part V, Infantry Drill 
Regulations); first-aid instruction; range and gallery practice. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 4. Lectures, general military policy 
as shown by military history of United States and military obliga- 
tions of citizenship; service of information: combat (to be illustrated 
by small tactical exercises) ; United States Infantry Drill Regulations, 
to include School of Company; camp sanitation for small commands. 

3. Military art. Three hours a week (counting 14 points). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. The same as course 2(a). Combat 
firing, if practicable, but collective firing should be attempted in 
indoor ranges by devices now in vogue at United States Disciplinary 
Barracks. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight* 4. United States Infantry Drill Regula- 
tions, to include School of Battalion and Combat (350-622); Small- 
Arms Firing Regulations; lectures as in course 2(b); map reading; 
camp sanitation and camping expedients. 

4. Military art. Three hours a week (counting 14 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 10. The same as course 2(a); signaling; 
semaphore and flag; first-aid. Work with sand table by constructing 
to scale intrenchments, field work, obstacles, bridges, etc. Compari- 
son of ground forms (constructed to scale) with terrain as represent- 
ed on map; range practice. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 4. Lectures, military history (recent) ; 
service of information and security (illustrated by small tactical prob- 
lems in patrolling, advance guards, rear guards, flank guards, trench 
and mine warfare, orders, messages, and camping expedients) ; 
marches and camps (Field Service Regulations and Infantry Drill 
Regulations). 

5. Military art. Five hours a week (counting 24 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Duties consistent with rank as cadet 
officers or noncommissioned officers in connection with the practical 
work and exercises laid down for the unit or units. Military sketching. 



MlLITAl; - riCB 

(b) Theoretical Weight IX Minor Uu 

in minor tactics. Unit* - I School of tl map ma: I 

Weight 8. Company administration, general principlet and 

return- W. Igfat 1. Military bistoiy. \\ . light I. 

6. Military art. Fiw- hours a S I M k (OOtffitillfl %i units). 

(a) rractical. Weight 18. Sam.- as course 5(a). Military 

sketching. 

(b) Theoretical Weight n. Minor tactic* (continued); map 

maneuvers. Weigh* B. Klein. uits of international law. \\ 
Property accountability; method of obtaining suppli- 

(Army Regulations). Weight 1. 

7. Military art. Five hours a week (counting 24 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Duties consistent with rank 
officers or noncommissioned officers in connection with 

work and lee BCheduled for the unit or units. Military sketch- 

ing. 

(b) Theoretical. Weight 11. Tactical problems, small tores, all 
arms combined; map maneuvers; court-martial proceedings (Manual 
for Courts-martial). International relations of Am* rica from di~ 
ery to present day; gradual growth of principles of international Ian 
embodied in American diplomacy, legislation, and treats 

hology of war and kindred BUD al principles of - 

only planned to show the intimate relationship bets 
Statesman and the soldier (not to exceed 5 lectures). 

8. Military art. Five hour l -(counting 21 units). 

(a) Practical. Weight 13. Same as course 7(a), 

(b) Theoretical. \Y< sight 11. Tactical problems (continued); 
map maneuvers. Rifle in war. Lectures on military history and 
poll. 






DEGREES. DIPLOMAS 
AND PRIZES' 

Fifty-first Annual Commencement, June 7. 1918. 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 
1918. 



Master of Arts 



\i Robinson Wcnon 1'<»ki Royal, l'\. 

A B 

Master of Science. 
ElOWABD TKOT I*iiii i II-— sum Geobgi 

( 'I u:i \< I Fl OTD \V» II- MOM \n IOWA 

A.B., w 

Master of Science in Civil Engineering. 

J. ElBNCH ROBINSOU MotGAH IOWH 

Virginia University, 1915. 

Master of Science in Agriculture. 

H mm i v Lucnm Cbani Moboah rown 

Virginia t 

Civil Engineer. 

Qbomi Bdmohd Tatlob Ch 

Virginia I 

Bachelor of Arts. 

Ray Ami W«S1 [Jlfl 

Jesse Hom I Bdj Aubueh 

H.u.i iv EABL BBOBfOBD Cvrnw 

Cabtkb Richabd Beshov M ira 

Pui.im Buwnti w 

I In J El II \i:y I " u:i I Win i : 

I ) A \ 1 1 » Ai ' 11 l) CHBIBTOPHn PlUBflLLI K s 

AMA.M) RXNI Cm I.riT Mori; \ \ |.»\\ \ 

Vl OTD Brooks OOl M ITU 

Hiiin Vm:m\i\ DAYIMOll Winn 

Ida Pi EABL PULTOH Htm LlfGTOfl 

Russbxl Loqah Pubiud M\nm\> row 

Hakoid Mkhaii GabBETI BUDCIBTOBT 

I I II AMU ton >\ r 

GSOBQB Aiiiv Hawk in-. .Ik PAMKXMSBUW 

Wni iam Evuu.ii 1 1 1 1 1 M 



298 West Virginia University Catalocik 

John Cu mi ns Hipp. Morgantown 

Virginia Jacobs Morgantown 

Helen Cybil Judge Grafton 

Forrest D\ rbab Knapp Morgantown 

Charles Lester Lazzeli Morgantown 

LA] All LOVETT BULLTOWN 

Margaret Virginia Martin Bluefield 

Frank Mauzy Rexrode 

Mary Francess Patterson Morgantown 

Gladys Pennington Morgantown 

Clara Elaine Peoples Cameron- 
Nell Prichard t Fairmont 

Ethel Gertrude Ross * Hedgesville 

Greek S ayre Morgantown 

Valerie Elizabeth Schultz Morgantown 

Oliver Shurtleff Morgantown 

Harriet Stealey Clarksburg 

Katherine Elizabeth Tickle Bluefield 

An na Elizabeth Traubert Wellsburg 

Clifford Loring Van Camp Paden City 

Clyde William Wellen Morgantown 

Mary Jane White Morgantown 

Edward Doulgas Woodyard Spencer 

Mattie Ellen Wright Uniontown. Pa. 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines. 

Arthur Michael Hag an Morgantown 

Bachelor of Laws. 

William French Hunt Morgantown 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1812. 
James Edward Kennedy Boothsville 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1913. 

Harman Haller Kerr Morgantown 

William Louis Peters Huntington 

Arthur Guy Stone Pinchton 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. 

Ralph Lawrence Barlow Beverly 

Joseph Henry Boyd Colliers 

James Evans Dille Morgantown 

Ernest Hambrick Athens 

Charles Henry Hartley Cottageville 

Paul Minor Hawkins Fairmont 

Clarence Lee King Ronceverte 

Charles Kislig Morgantown 

John Moore Lowe Morgantown 

Robert Paul Lowe Morgantown 

Bruce McKinley Morgantown 

George Stanley Pierce Tunnelton 

James Clyde Smith Morgantown 

Ernest Stutzman Beverly 

John Harrison Toler Sun Hill 

Clarence Lazear Underwood Moundsville 

Albert Frank Vierheller Parkersburg 



3, I tlPLOM \> AM' PHI 
Bachelor of Science. 

i Major in Medicine > 

Ai:i:\h \m BMWS I'n n ahi i PB 1 \. 1' v. 

Mil lOH BTOJfl I : i i\ IfOBGAifTOWK 

On Palls Diagonal, low v 

Ki M \ HOABD 1'oini MABIOlf, I'\ 

HOWARD EUbLI IfOOH HASTINGS 

i Cabj Newmah Spencee 

James Maoisos Reed, Ju IfoMAjfrowa 

Bachelor of Science. 
( Major in ESngin 

Hugo Bbuci i h i i\<. Mom unowi 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. 

Edward ciimon Ben neti Mom uitowe 

Lewis Vau C \i;i' Bum 

CLAEENCI WATKINS McCUTCHEOH Kl« BEWOOD 

M.\i;\ in EdWABD R Mil MOBOAHTOWB 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. 

\ Hovsep Boghosiaj Teheran, Persia 

Rot WIlliam Brunei Wellsi 

raymond wat805 \y.\i:i> cownellsville, i*\ 

John Stewart Williamson New Cumberland 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. 

Dwili FRANCIS ( 'i:o\i\ RlCHW< 

James Garner Montgomery Kane, Pa. 

Wallace Paui Raemsch Ki 

Tn«'i:\ PBLN4 I 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics. 

M \i:y Ki.iz lb] i;i Nutter \ 

Tin besa i: \\ 

Certificate of Graduation in Pharmacy. 

ERNEST Ml ii l n H LRRI6 MORGAN i>>\\ \ 

Artist's Diploma, Voice. 

Mil DEI :> Loi IS PRICI MORGANTOWN 

Artist's Diploma, Piano. 

row 

: M \ CLOTELI HEWITI M \ \ M n . i < I \ 

Rachei Tuckwlllei V \\ 

p*^" 1 Williams M wn 

H Hi \ IK v Will [AMS II R R 

Artist's Diploma, Violin. 
K I > I T 1 1 Li ( 1ETIA HARDY M WX 



300 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Artist's Diploma, Pipe Organ. 

Jessie Beavers Grafton 

Teacher's Certificate, Piano. 
Marelle Eleanor Whetsei.i Morgantown 

PRIZES AND HONORS. 
The Tax Commission Prize. 

Sterling Bodine Bottome, Sophomore Moundsville 

The American Law Book Company Prize. 
Clifford Raymond Snider, Third Year Law. .. .Morgantown 

Phi Beta Kappa. 
H alley Earl Berisford. 
Pauline Brewster. 
Helen Mary Carle. 
David Alfred Christopher. 
Anna Elizabeth Traubert. 



LIST OF STl'DKNTS 



STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE COLLEGES 



NOTE -The following list in< 
rolled in the various college* of the I'niversity, a: D alpha- 

betical order. Fallowing • ident'a name and . :vcn 

his class. COS Btndj which he is pursuing, or the degree for 

which he is a candidate. The word freshman, sophomore. • 
lowing U 's name, indicates his rank on the first day of 

remher, 1918. Regular students in the Collese of Law have the fol- 
lowing standing in the University: first-year sophomore; 
second-year students, junior; third-year stu<: pt those 
holding a bachelor's degree. Students whose names are marked with 
an a •) are ranke<: men. but are conditioned in one or 
more preparatory sub; - udents marked as special students are 

Ith the regulations found on pac^ ?>2 of this 
Catalogue. Students enrolled in the Division of Military Science are 

-mated as follows: those in Student's Army Training Corps by an 
- the name; those in the Naval Unit by an (n); tho- 
the Cadet Corp by a (c). 



Aaron. Sarah Maude 
fAckermann. Maximilian Joseph 

r. William Vircil 
Adams. Jane Wool' 
Adams, John Aneelo 
Agee, Linwood (c) 

-son. John Dotty (c) 
•Alleman. Braden Miller 
•Allen. Anna Jane 
Allen. Carl Beaty 
Allen, Glenn Frank 
Allen. Robert Ethan 

Earl W 
Anderson, Effie Katherine 
Anderson. James Lee 
(c) 
>. Ida Marie 
Armbruster. Vincent John 

trong, Norman M 
Armstrong. Virgin 

•Arnold. Clyde Earl 
•Arnold 

William 
PS, Junior Ear 



ott 
Wheeling 
Grafton 
Huntington 
intown 
Williamstown 
Mor^antown 
Buckhannon 

-antown 
Moorefield 
Park 

- mtown 
Graham, Va. 
Mannineton 
Eitth 

• >ns 

kjhb 
Wheeling 

lrgh. Pa. 

Fairmont 

Thou 

Thomas 

Cumberlar 



Fr.. A.B. 

Fr., : - 
Fr.. a 

Fr.. : - 
Fr A. B. 

L B. 

L B. 
Soph., A. B. 
Jun.. B.S 
Jun. 
Fr.. : - 
Jun.. 
Sop! 

Fr.. ' 

Soph 

Soph 

M E 

a a 
a a 



Fr.. 
Fr. 

Fr.. 
Fr.. 



tDec> 



302 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



♦Backus, Erskine (s) 
Baer, Herbert Kelsey (s) 
Bailey, Claire Burns 
♦Bailey, Everett (s) 
Bailey, George Silas (s) 
Bailey. Lilian 
♦Bailey, Paul Harlow 
Bailey Russell Brooks (s) 
♦Baker, Courtland Darke (s) 
Baker, Grace Elliott 
Baker, Herman Leroy (s) 
Baker, Lucy Ellen 
Ball, Heloise Thomas 
Ball. Nina Elizabeth 
♦Ball, Walter Frank 
♦Barber, Cassel Sylvester (n) 
Barger, Irene Hess 
Barker, Mildred Joy 
♦Barnes, Denver Naaman (s) 
Barnes, Mabel Irene 
♦Barnes, Paul DeChancey (s) 
Barns, Bernie Hodges 
Barns, Helen Virginia 
Barns, Mary Hodges 
Barrett, Edgar Overton 
Barrett, Harold James (s) 
Barry, Lawrence Leo 
Barth, Harry (s) 
♦Bartlett, Kenneth Webster 
Bartlett, Ola Frances 
♦Bartlett, Ralph Wilbur (s) 
♦Bartlett, William Dana (n) 
♦Bassel, Dana Benjamin (s) 
Batten, Beryl 
Batten, Ruth 

Bauer. Richard William (s) 
♦Beckwith, Samuel Ernest (n) 
♦Behen, John Henry, Jr. 
Bekenstein, Jacob William (s) 
Bell, Agnes Mae 
Bell, Farley Warren (s) 
Beller, Bess Liter 
Bennett, Hazel Dorothy 
Bennett, Paul Clifford (s) 
Berg, Anthony 

BJS., University of Wisconsin, 19 
Berg, Hilda Jean 
Berry, Helen Kathleen 
Berry, Rachel Rose 
♦Berry, Ralph Dentzil (s) 
Berry, Rebecca Elizabeth 
Berryman, Charlotte Elizabeth 
♦Bibb, William Allen 
Bibbee, Carl Roush (s) 
Bickel, Charles Russell (s) 
Bickel, Francis Holliday (s) 



Ansted 


. Fr„ A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Matoaka 


Fr., A.B. 


Grafton 


Soph., B.S.C.E. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Bluefield 


Fr., A.B. 


Weston 


Sen., B.S. 


Charles Town 


Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Moundsville 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Belleville 


Soph., A.B. 


Spencer 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Grafton 


Fr., A.B. 


Bristol 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Shinnston 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Pennsboro 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Fairmont 


Soph., A.B. 


Pennsboro 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Morgantown 


Special A. & 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Fr., A.B. 


Cameron 


Sen., A.B. 


Fairmont 


1st Yr. Phar. 


New Martinsville 


Fr., A.B. 


Barracksville 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Webster 


Fr., A.B. 


Grafton 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


New Martinsville 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Mt. Clare 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Cambridge. Ohio 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Shepherdstown 


Soph., A.B. 


Glenville 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Grafton 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairmont f 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Grad. A. & S. 


&in, 1912. 
Point Marion, Pa 


Fr.. A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Heaters 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Cassville 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Sutton 


Sen., A.B. 


Bluefield 


Soph., A.B. 


Huntington 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Hanna 


Jun., B.S.Agr. 


Parkersburg 


Jun., B.S.E.M. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 



List op 

•Billingslea, Arthur Blake (n) 
Billingslea, Jean Gertrude 
•Binna, Paul Dana 
BlnnSi \\';iii'-: (a) 

Birch, LiUle Hanes 
Bjornson, Edwin 
Blackburn, Schuj ler Coe (8) 
•Blake, Bar] (Mark.- (c) 
Blake, Orville K< , 
•Blatchford, Eddith La Verne 
•Blue, William Frederick (c) 
Boehm, Ralph (a) 
•Bolyard, William Howard (s) 
•Bonar, Willia Bar] (c) 
Bond, Harlej Donovan (s) 
Bond, Paul Van Horn (s) 
•Booth, Alexander Edward (n) 

■ bert Stephenson 
Borneman, William Charles (a) 

,i Kighl 
Boso, Qoldie Lucille 
Bottome, Sterling Bodine 
Boumly. Austin John 
Bowen, Edwin Hewlett (s) 
Bowera, Helen Walters 
•Bowera, James Paul (a) 
Bowman, Harvey P>inl 
•Bowman, Redolphus Heyer 
Boyles, Bonnie Lynne 
Bradley, Lyman Co 
•Bradley, William Orin 
Brady, Troy Arden (s) 

Brand. Beillah Or 

Brand, (Jail 

Brand, Linnle 

♦Brandon. Artie Leon (n> 

Brannon, Linn Mapel (a) 

Brewater, John McLaughlin 

n Whittaker (a) 
Brigga, Marion Ellis 

>1. Lolls Rood (C) 
Blanch Pah' 
[water, Jennings Hyatl (a) 
Brock, Robert Luther 

Brown, Lamia Louisa 
♦Brown. Prank Orcutl (a) 
•Brown, Hugh Wayne (a) 
•Brown, James Willard 
Brown, Olive 
Brown, Rosa Duncan 
•Brown, Samuel Byrne (c) 
Brown. Virginia 
•Browning, Kathryn Sylvia 
•Baharah, Michael Salem 

Buckey, William Kim' 



Studi 




Worthing 


1 1 B M I . 


Pairmont 


Jun . A P, 


Fairmont 


i : B M i : 


Pairmont 


P A B. 


Wheeling 


A B 


iiitou n 


Jun.. P 


Baltimore. Md. 




Sherrard 


- E.E 


Vol srantown 




Belington 


B. 8. H . E 


Charleston 


Pi.. A B 


Philippi 


Pr.. B.S 


King ? 


Pr.. B.S.< 


Cameron 


Pr. 


Mt Clare 


LB. 


Loal 


Soph.. A P. 


!<• no\ a 


m i: 


Middlebourne 


2nd Vr. Law 


We8ton 


LB. 


I >a\ is 


Soph.. A P. 


Parketrsburg 


Soph.. A P.. 


Moundsville 


Jun.. A I: 


Cameron 


i i: 


Moorefield 


LB. 


ling 


Soph., A.P 


Cheat Haven, Pa. 


A P, 


eling 




Meyeradale, Pa. 


Pr. B.S.< 


Clarksburg 


Soph.. A.B. 


Ball Imort . M 1 




Huntington 


Pr.. B.S.E.E 


Wall 


Jun.. A P. 


Morgantown 


Pr.. A P. 


Morgantown 


B B HP. 


Morgantown 


Jun.. All 


Philippi 


Pr.. B.SJ 


■on 


ph., A.B. 


We iton 


Soph., A. P.. 


Morgantown 


M.. A.P 


Morgantown 


•:.. A P 


Morgantown 


A P. 


Belington 


Jun.. A B 


Salem 


\ P 


Morgantown 


•i LB 


Morgantown 


\ B 


Charleston 




Lumberport 


Pr.. B.S 


Albright 




Grafton 


D . LB 


Pairmont 


Jun . B.S.E.E 


an town 


Pr . 


Morgantown 




Morgantown 




Charleston 





mont 



Soph a P. 



m 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



Burdette, William Leps 
Burk, Helen Elizabeth 
Burka. Max (s) 
♦Burkhardt, Marie Louise 
♦Burley, Joseph Lawrence (s) 
Burley, Maude Marie 
Burns. James Francis (s) 
♦Burnside. Lester Wade 
Burton, William Preston (s) 
*Butler, Charles Claud (s) 
*Butler, James Dalzell (c) 
Butts, Randolph Henry (c) 

♦Cadden, James Joseph (n) 
♦Cahill, Thomas Joseph (s) 
Callahan, Elsie Ethel 
Campbell, Carl 
Campbell, Clinton Rearick 
Campbell, Hazel Elizabeth 
Campbell. Samuel Lewis (s) 
Campbell, William Cameron 
♦Canfield, Joseph Vergil (s) 
♦Caplinger, St. Clair (n) 
♦Carden, Andrew Burruss (s) 
Carden, Charles Stephenson (s) 
Cargill, Virginia Isabella 
Carle, Elsie Dorothy 
Carney, Chesney Michael (c) 
♦Carney, Chester Wayne (s) 
Carpenter, Clarence Denver (s) 
Carpenter, Simon William 
Carrico. Merrill Davis (s) 
Carrier, Marshall Hughes 
Carroll, Alan Keyser 
Carson, Charles Allen (s) 
Carson. Eulalia Mae 
Carte, Estol Taylor (s) 
♦Carter, James Merion (s) 
Casseday, John Forman (s) 
Casto, Charles Clayton 

B.S., West 'Virginia 'University, 1917. 
Cather, John Duane (s) 
Caudy, Daniel Gilbert (s) 
Gaudy, Newton Brooks 
♦Cavendish, Dana Lawrence (s) 
Cawley, Anna Agnes 
♦Chadduck, James Donald 
♦Chaiken, Louis Harlan 
*Chalfant_ Leslie Homer (s) 
Chalfant, "Sarah Margaret 
Chambers, Vannetta 
Chandler, Hudson 
Chenoweth, Fred Myer 
*Chorpening, Wilson Malcolm 
Chrislip, W r alter Grant (s) 



Lewisburg 


Jun., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Moundsville 


Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 


Davis 


Soph., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Jun., A.B. 


Lost Creek 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Matoaka 


Soph., A.B. 


Hedgesville 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Hedgesville 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B. 


Keyser 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Smithton 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


1st Year Phar 


Wheeling 


Special Law 


Davis 


Sen., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 


Charles Town 


Fr., A.B. 


Sutton 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Eikins 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Zela 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Weston 


Soph., B.S.Ch.E. 


Charleston 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Sherrard 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Cairo 


Fr., A.B. 


Buckhannon 


Jun., A.B. 


Terra Alta 


Fr., A.B. 


Keyser 


Pharmacy 


Masontown 


Sen., B.S.Agr. . 


St. Marys 


Ft., A.B. 


St. Marys 


Soph., A.B. 


Connellsville, Pa. 


Soph., B.S.C.E. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Terra Alta 


Fr., A.B. 


Spencer 


1st Yr. Med. 


ity, 1917. 




Flemington 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Camden on Gauley 


Soph., A.B. 


Weston 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Rainelle 


Fr., A.B. 


Sistersville 


Jun., A.B. 


Grafton 


Fr., A.B. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Fr., A.B. 


Blacksville 


Fr., B.S.E.M. 


Fairview 


Fr., A.B. 


Martinsburg 


Soph., A.B. 


St. Albans 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Philippi 


Jun., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Philippi 


Fr., A.B. 



List op Sti i 






•Christie, Robert Stokes (s) 
Christopher David Alfred 

LB . W< m Virginia 
Christv, Mary Louise 
Church, Dorothy Virginia 
Clapham, Roper Everharl (c) 
Clark, Alva Bernard (a) 
Clark, afai? Etatee 
Clarke, Presley Wilmotl (s) 
Clarkaon, Jamea Wood 
Clelland, Gene (n) 
•Clevenger, Eugene Lester (a) 
Cobun. Mabel Souders 
•Coburn. Raymond Henry (s) 
Cochran. Anagrace Bell 
Cochran. Philip Jamea 
Coffindatf. r, RoSSeU Smith 

p, Beatrice Elizabeth 
•Colebank, Harry Georpe 
•Coleman, Conrad Durand (a) 
♦Coleman, John William (8) 
♦Collins, Earl (a) 
Collins. Offun Warfield (n) 
♦Coltrane, Eulois Glenn (a) 
Compton. Eva Day 
Compton, Harry Crawford, Jr. 
Compton, rila Zoe 
Conaway. Donald Edward (s) 
Conaway. Elizabeth 
•Conaway. Oscar Robison (a) 
♦Conner, Clair Harold 
♦Conner. Louis Danford (s) 
Connor. .Taints Michael (c) 
Coogle, Rachel Agnes 
♦Cook. John Roach (c) 
♦Cooper, James Stuart (a) 
♦Copley. Michael Joseph (si 
♦Corbitt, Gordon 1 
Corley. Marguerite 
Cottle. John Brooks (a) 

•Cottle. Samuel Walter (s) 
Cottrill, Sidney Raymond | 
♦Counts. William Ralph (a) 
•Cox. Fred Raymond (s) 
Frederick Walter (a) 

Crane. Dorothy McCoy 

•Craver, Daniel Barth (a) 

Crawford. Thomas Stephen (a) 

•Crawford, Wyatt Gregory (a) 

Creiphton, Myrtle Lou 
Crickenberper. Harold Philip ( 
Crimm, Carl Max (s) 
Cropan, Jay Dewey (s) 
Cronin. Harry Raymond 
Crooks. Ruth Wilkinson 



I'niontoun, Pi 

If organ town 

aforgantown 
Qrafton 

Martinsburp 

Bramwell 

New Martinsvilh- 
Graham Station 
Charleston 

Ifannlngton 

aforgantown 
aforgantown 
aforgantown 
aforgantown 
Jane Lew 
Webeter Springs 

Parsons 
Beck h- y 
Victor 
I >a v i s 
Salem 
Haywood 
Ke> 
Grafton 

Keyaer 
aforgantown 

Fairmont 

Barrackarille 

Moundsville 
Moundsville 

Iforgantown 
aforgantown 

Fairmont 

Davis 

Camden 
Waved y 
Sutton 
Spencer 
Spencer 

Clarksburp 

Welch 
Qrafton 
Parmington 
Iforgantoa d 
lit Hope 
ETJngwood 
Huntington 
Parkerabnrg 

l) Graft on 
Adamston 

burg 
Richwood 
enawood 



F: B.8.C.E 

G: 

Fr . BSII F 

A B 
Soph A B 
Soph . A B 

Sops . a B 

Soph A p.. 

Soph., n.srhi; 
Ft., B.8JB ED 

I": A B 
Jun . AT. 
Fr.. B S M F 
Jun.. AH. 

Soph., a I', 

Fr.. A P 
Jun.. B B H i: 
Fr.. A B. 
Fr.. A B. 
Fr.. A i: 
Fr A l; 
Fr. B.S.E.M. 
Fr.. B S M F 
Soph., P, S H F 
Jun.. AH. 

A B 
Soph., B.S.CJE 

a i; 
Fr.. B.S.C E 
Fr. PS M F 
• Fr . B.8 M l ■: 
Sen.. B B F E 
Jun a f. 
Fr B.8.EJC 
Fr.. B.S.Agr. 
Fr., a B 

I1SK F 
Soph.. A i; 

•: . A B 

Ft., a B 
FY., B.8.C i: 

Fr.. A B 

I B 

B A < i ' 
Jun. A B 

\ B 
Fr. 

A B 
! B 
Fr . B B F F 

\ B 

I B 

D A B 

Sen. B.8.H 



306 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



Cuddy, Elizabeth Robb 
Cumley, Luella 

Cummings, Harlan Sigsbee (s) 
Cummings, Hugh Raymond (s) 
Cummings, Robert Michael 
Cummings, Sarah Waller 
♦Cunningham, James Auther (n) 
Cuppy, Clifford Holland (s) 

Dailey, Robert Wood 
Daniel, Ada Cynthia 
♦Daniel. Ross Preston (s) 
Daniels, Harold Chauncie (c) 
Darling, Anna Belle 
Daugherty, Grattan Mitchell 
♦Daughenbaugh, Paul Jones (s) 
Davia, Faustina De Carlo 
Davis, Esten (s) 
Davis, Floyd Leslie (n) 
♦Davis, Howard Smith (s) 
Davis, Hubert Byrel (s) 
Davis, Cabell Seal 
Davis, Jasper Alden Worcester. 
Davis, Norvel Reed 
t Da vis, Thedford Owen 
Davis, Theodore Edward (s) 
Davis, William Browning 
♦Davisson, Brooks R. (s) 
Davisson, Laura Venus 
Dawkins, Nettie 
♦Dawson, Paul Batten (n) 
♦Dean, Grace 
Dearman, Alfred Morgan 

Deegan, Charles James (s) 
♦Deem, Herman Elsworth (s) 
DeForest, William Ezra 
♦Dennison, Henry (s) 
DePue, Harold Foster (s) 
♦DePue, James Marshall (s) 
De Vebre, Elmer Witt (s) 
Devine, Averil lone 
♦De Vinney, Dallas H. (n) 
Dewar, Donald Roderick (s) 
♦Dewar. Maud Margaret 
♦Dick, Gayle Pauline 
Dickman, Harold Joseph (s) 
♦Diez, Bernhardt Rudolph (s) 
Dixon, Helen Lucille 
Dixon, Howard Gist (s) 
♦Dixon, Ray Thomas (s) 
Dodd, Clarence Orvhrelle (s) 
Dolley, Eunice Pennington 



Elkins 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Sen.. A.B. 


Kingwood 


Fr., A.B. 


Wellsburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Weston 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Hinton 


Soph., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Fr., A.B. 


New Cumberland 


Fr., A.B. 


Moorefield 


Fr., A.B. 


Welch 


Fr., A.B. 


Marshes 


Fr., A.B. 


Parsons 


Soph. : B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Hinton 


Soph., A.B. 


Thomas 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Monongah 


Soph., A.B. 


Pence Springs 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Piedmont 


Sen., B.S.E.E. 


Out Crops, Pa. 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Weston 


Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 


Pence Springs 


Fr., A.B. 


Beverly, Mass. 


Sen., B.S.C.E. 


Charles Town 


1 Soph., B.S.Agr. 


Huntington 


Fr., A.B. 


Lost Creek 


Fr., A.B. 


Princeton 


1st Yr. Med. 


Simpson 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Harrisville 


Soph., A.B. 


Sandyville 


Soph., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Buchannon 


Fr., A.B. 


Reedy 


Sen., B.S. & 2d Yr. 




Med. 


Wheeling 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Clarksburg ■ 


1st Yr. Phar.^" 


Keyser 


Fr., A.B. 


Spencer 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Spencer 


Fr, B.S.E.E. 


Ronceverte 


Fr, B.S.E.E. 


Hundred 


Soph., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 


Parkersburg 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Charles Town 


Fr., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Pleasant Valley 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Huntington 


Fr., A.B. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Summersville 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairview 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 



tDeceased 



List oj Stud 






Donham. Paul Earnest Jennings 
♦Donohue Joseph (s) 
Dorsey, Krwin 
Dorsey, Ida Belle 
•Dorsey, Victor Iferrell (s) 
Dorsey, W< sh . Franklin (c) 
•Dongla8, Carl (s) 

Dowdy. Olive Tallman 
Drake, (Mara Belle 
•Drasnin, Joseph William 
Drebert, Kuth 

Duckwall, Joeepb Smith (s) 
•Dndley, Eugene Arthur (s) 
Daerr, Charles Edward (s) 
Doling, Sago Bruce (s) 
Dull. John Reed 
Duncan. Stella Leo 
Dunn. Jasper M< i towel! 
Dye, Mabel Taylor 

Eakin. Armstrong (c) 
Easterday, Harold Jacobs (s) 
Bdmondson, Gladys Chastaigne 

Fdmondson. Helen Louise 
Kdwards, William Harh'.v (n) 
•Ellinger, George Wilbur (s) 
Ellis, Davis Werninger (s) 

Ellis. Louis George, Jr. (s) 

♦Pinch. John William (s) 

Bmsweller, Samuel Leonard 
Bnglehardt, Louise Regene 

Ensign. Darwin Abbotl 
Erwin. Andrew Philip (8) 
Bitter, Susan Eleanor 
Everhart, Lysle Rogers (c) 
Everstine, Allen Pern 
Ewing, Clara Pyle 



Pahey, Willis Howard (s) 
Pair. Grace ( Secilia 
•Parley, Harvey Prentice (s) 
Parmer, George Robert (s) 

Parquharson. John Bowman (s) 

I 

1 



arrell, Albert Connelly (s) 
ast. Josephine Elisabeth 

•Patig, Richard Stoll (s) 

Pay. /.ilia Kelshaw 
Pear, Harvey Earl (s) 
Pederer, George Andrew, Jr. (s) 
•Fehrenbacn, Howard (<•) 
Peiss, Blanch Bsts 
Pelton, Janet Flora 
Perguson, Kathleen Bing 
Perguson, Robert Vincent 
Perguson, Virginia W< 



(.-) Pairmont 

Clarksburg 
Summersi i 1 1 »- 
Mt Lookout 
Wheeling 
Mt. Lookout 
Spencer 
Wayne 

Mann i nut on 

Montgomery 
Boomer 

Berkeley Springs 
Sistersvllle 
New Martinsville 
Morgan town 
Glade, Pa, 
Clarksburg 
Morgantown 
Mineral Wells 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Spencer 

Albright 

Grafton 

Mounds ville 

New Martinsville 

Morgantown 

Colliers 

Huntington 

Pairmont 

Morgantown 
Keyaer 

eley 
Harrisburg, Pa 

Wheeling 

Wallace 

Charleston 

V \v Martinsville 
Kermll 
Clarksl 
Morgantown 

:k. Ohio 
Thomas 
Pairmont 

Morgantown 
Wheeling 

ler 
Parsons 
Huntington 
Charl( 

Shinn- 



Bopli a i; 

\ B 
Jun.. B B Agr 
Ben . B.8JB H 

Fr.. IIS 1 
Soph A B 

1 1 s M E 
Jun.. 15 S II E 
Soph.. All. 
Pr.. A B 
Pr . A B 
Jun.. A B 
Pr.. I!S M E 
Pr.. B S M E 

s. n B a i: E 
1st Xi U 

Pr.. A.B. 

i 

Jun.. All. 

Pr.. B.S.M E 
Pr.. B.8 A 

A.B. 
Soph.. A.B 
Pharmacy 
Pr.. B.S.C i: 

Fr., A.B. 

Pr.. B S H i; 
Pr.. B.S.C i; 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph.. A.B. 
Fr.. A3. 
Pr.. A i: 
Fr . B .S.H.P. 
1st fl Med. 
U.S.E.E. 

Pr.. A a 
Pr.. B.S.H E 
Pr.. B.S.E.E. 
. A.B 

il Bng 
\ B 

s..ph a r. 

Fr., B S M i: 
Soph . A 

. A P. 
Jun.. A B 
Pr . A P. 

I B 
Jun.. A B 
Soph . a B 

\ B 

\ B 



1^08 



West Virginia University Catalogue- 



Field, Harold Watson (s) 
♦Fife, Frances Elizabeth 
Figueroa, Liborio (c) 
Filler, Paul Benton Scott (s) 
Fisher, Abe Alvin (s) 
Fisher, Angela Dorothy 
Fisher, Arlyne Agnes 
Fisher, Claire Beatrice 
♦Fisher, Dana Earl 
Fisher, Mary Elizabeth 
♦Fisher, Stanley George (s) 
Fisher, William Curtis 
♦Fisher, William Glenn (s) 
Fitch, James Plummer, Jr. (s 
Fitzgerald, Frances Pride 
♦Fitzsimmons, Ralph (s) 
♦Flanagan Edgar Francis (s) 
♦Flanegan," Charles Albert (s) 
Fleming, Carrie Kathryn 
♦Fleming, Frank Odell (s) 
Fleming, Goldie Mae 

A.B., West Virginia 
♦Fleming, Joseph Arch 
Fleming, Ruth Sprague 
Fleshman, Dewey Linwood (s 
Fling, Eva Myrtelle 

A.B., West Virginia 
Floyd, Forrest Hugh (n) 
Foley, Irene Stanton 
Foose, Alphonse Maurice 
Ford, Aubrey Eugene (s) 
♦Fordyce, Cless Yelving (c) 
♦Forgey, Hugh (s) 
♦Fouchs, Lawrence Earl (s) 
♦Fowler, Glenn A. (n) 
Fox, Joseph Andrew 
♦Frame, Luke Wright 
Frame, Roy Ira (s) 
♦Frank, Harry Blane, Jr. (s) 
♦Frank, Lewis (s) 
Frantz, Luther Marshall (c) 
Frashure, Reginald Claire 
♦Freeman, Charles Burton 
Freismuth, Louis Joseph (s) 
French, William Wirt (s) 
♦Fretwell, Harry Gordon (s) 
Friend, Angie Alabama 
Fries, Laura Evangeline 
Frome, Wilbur Conan (s) 
♦Frum, John Andrew (s) 
Frum, John Maurice (n) 
Frum, Mary Alice 
Fry, Joseph Daniel (s) 
tFuccy, Joseph Robert 



Charleston 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Humacao, P. R. 


Soph., A.B. 


Paw Paw 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Canton, Ohio 


1st Yr. Med. 


Reynoldsville, Pa. 


Soph., A.B. 


Reynoidsville, Pa. 


Sen., A.B. 


Reynoldsville, Pa. 


Sen., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Sutton 


Fr., A.B. 


Sherrard 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Flatwoods 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


) Morgantown 


Ft., B.S.E.E. 


Bluefield 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Moundsville 


Fr., A.B. 


Shirley 


Fr., A.B. 


Uniontown, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Grafton 


Jun., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Grad. A. & S. 


University, 1917. 




Fairmont 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


) Pence Springs 


Fr., A.B. 


Tanner 


Grad., A.M. 


University, 1911. 




Mannington 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Clarksburg 


Special A. & S 


Huntington 


Fr., A.B. 


Huntington 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Middlebourne 


Fr., A.B. 


Ravenswood 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


New Martinsville 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Harrisville 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Hinton 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Sutton 


Soph., A.B. 


Elkins 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Williamson 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Clarksburg 


Soph., B.S.C.E. 


Parsons 


Fr., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Bluefield 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Berkeley Springs 


Sen., A.B. 


Gassaway 


Fr., A.B. 


Salem 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Rosemont 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Hedgesville 


Fr.. A.B. 


Weston 


Fr., A.B. 



tDeceased. 






Li>t of Stud 



ioi 



Furbee, Clark Mahon (n) 
Furbee. Russell Logan 

Fuss. .Wva Lncile 



Gallagher, Era Eleanor 
Gallaaple, Jamei I hren 
•Gamble. Mortimer Wllllami 
Gaudy, Helen Cobun 
Gaudy, Preston Boehner 
♦Gardner. Sigel Ona 
Garretr. Harold liicbael 

AJl'> 

Garrett. Patrick Henn 
t*Garvey. Edward Roams 

Garvin. Herbert Dean- 
Gaschhr. Marie Anna 
Gaston, Charles Nicoles (s) 
•Gatrell. Ethel M 

Itte, ft \ Brinton 
*Gaylord, Chai latna (s) 

Gaylord, Richard Camden 
George, Elizabeth 
Gerwlg, Charles < >lin (a) 
Gibson. Mary Blanche 
Giffin. Theodore Clifton (s) 
Gilbert. Edna Blanche 
Gillaspie, Beulah Vesta 
Gilmore. Bernard Harold (a) 
'Gilmore, Virginia 

Given. Arnold Jarrett 

(liven. Leslie Ennnett 

Givens, Sarah Elizabeth 

Givens. Tula Rose 

Glass. Edgar Curran 

GlasSCOCk, William Ellsworth. Jr. 

Glover, Theda Rae 
Gocke. Thomas Vincen' 
Goddin. Eva Moyi 

Goff. John Trevy 
•Golden. Marvin Luther (s) 
Goldsborough, Daisy Mae 
Goucher, Mary Elizabeth 
Graham, Carrie Virginia 
Graham, Cecil Harold (s) 
Graham. David ('alder 
Graham, Ernest Wray 
•Grant. Gladys Muriel Gail 
•Grant. William Henr> 
•Gray. Cleo Margaret 

Gray. William James (s) 
Green. Harry Leonard (a) 
Green. James Madison 



Manningtoo 


Pr- 


Mannington 


int Yr. I^w 


- 




lie 


. A B 




:i A B 




Fr.. 


Moorefield 


Fr . 


Morgantown 


Dh., A.B 


( 'larksburu' 




Blackarllle 


Fr.. A B 


Bridgeport 


2nd Yr. Law 






Mt Hope 




Pine 


Fr.. B 8 B B 


Moundsville 


Fr 


Morgantown 


Jun.. A 


Weston 


Ft.. I! S ' 


Morgantown 


Fr.. A B 


Bethlehem, Pa. 


Fr.. A B 


Clarksburg 


Fr.. A B 


Clarksburg 


Fr.. A B 


Middlebourne 


Fr.. A B 


Chapel 


Ft.. B.S.C.E. 


Sutton 


Soph., A.B. 


Rowlesbur*; 


:i., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr.. A.B. 


Ravenswood 


a.. A.B. 


Washington. I). C. 


•. . A.B 


-.m town 


Fr.. B.S.H.E. 


Elk view 


Soph.. A.B. 


Big Chimney 


ial Law 


Keenan 


Fr.. B.S.H E 


an 


Sen. A B 


Wellsburg 


3rd Yr. L 


antown 


A.B. & 1 




Yr. Law 


-antown 


. . A.B. 


nont 


ph .. A.B. 


Elk in- 


Ben , B.8 




Yr. • 


Burnt H<- 


Soph.. A.B. 


Flat woods 


Fr.. A B 


Romney 


Fr.. A B 


Toronto. Ohio 


. . A.B. 


Hinton 


Fr.. A.B. 


Mt Hope 




antown 


Fr. 


Hinton 




Northfork 


Fr.. 


Waatoo 


Fr.. : 3 


IVnnsboro 


Fr.. A B 


Mt Hope 


:i . A B 


K in trw ood 


Fr. BSC I 


Midland. Pa 


Fr A B 



2nd 



fDece 



no 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



Greer, Joseph William 
Gregg, John Morton, Jr. 
Griffin, Alice Rector 
Griffith, Vernia Fay 
♦Grimes, John Henry (s) 
Grimm, Wilson Osborn (c) 
•Grosscurth, Herbert Paul Ed- 
ward (s) 
♦Grove, Earl Clark 
Grow, Eugene Ashby (s) 
Guerrieri, Emidio (s) 
Gundling. John William (s) 

*Hackett, Everett (s) 
Hager, Alden (s) 
Hager, Paul Edmund 
Hainof\ Pearl Beatrice 
Hall, Beatrice Lorraine 
•Hall, Carlin Lyle (c) 
♦Hall, Clyde Lincoln (s) 
Hall, Golda Elizabeth 
Hall, Jeptha Roy (s) 
Hall. John Wotring 

B.S.C.E., West Virginia I 
♦Hall, Margaret Eleanor 
Hall, Olin Burr 
Hamilton, Dewey Dallas (s) 
♦Hamilton, Lillian Mae 
♦Hamilton, Miles Roy 
♦Hamilton, Russell James (s) 
♦Hamm, Raymond Vaughan (s) 
Hammock, Jess Everett (s) 
Hammond, David Marcellus (s) 
Hammond, Kent Cato (c) 
♦Hammond, Paul R. (s) 
Hamric, Erma Jane 
Hamrick, Russell 
*Hamstead, Ezra Elbert 
Hanford, Josephine 
Hanks, Reuel Mucklow 
Hardesty, Mearle Ellen 
Hardy, West 
Hark, Joseph Lewis (s) 
Harkins. Duncan Claire (c) 
Harman, Charles Nash (c) 
Harman, Robert Dove (s) 
Harmer, Hardin Roads (s) 
Harper, Maude Frances 
Harpold, Allen Earl (s) 
♦Harr, Goebel Walter (n) 
Harrick, Joseph Victor 
Harris, Corra 
♦Harrison, Bernard (n) 
Harrison, Theta 
Harrison, Thomas Waden (s) 



Fairmont 


Fr., B.S.Ch.Eng 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.Ch.Eng 


Clarksburg 


Sen., A.B. 


Spanishburg 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Grafton 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Buckhannon 


Soph., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Keyser 


Fr., A.B. 


Williamstown 


Soph., B.S.Agr. 


Uniontown, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Cedar Grove 


Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 


Tango 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Special Phar. 


Huntington 


Fr., A.B. 


Monongah 


Sen., A.B. 


Mannington 


Fr., A.B. 


Lost Creek 


Ft., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A. B. 


Mannington 


Fr., A.B. 


Choteau, Mont. 


Grad. Eng'g. 


^rsity, 1908. 




Harrisville 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Morgantown 


1st Yr. Med. 


Mannington 


Soph., A.B. 


Mannington 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Moundsville 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Griffithsville 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Kenova 


Fr., A.B. 


Moundsville 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


West Union 


Fr., A.B. 


Pennsboro 


Fr., A.B. 


Reedy 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Clay 


Soph., A.B. 


Eglon 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph, A.B. 


St. Albans 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Riverton 


1st Yr. Med. 


Shinnston 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Parsons 


Jun., A.B. 


Ravenswood 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Fairmont 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Punxsutawney, Pa. 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Fairmont 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Weston 


Fr., A.B. 



List 01 Sti DENT8 



311 



Harshbargei . Jennie 

♦Hart. Robert Brace (s) 

Hartley, Alpha Ruth 
Hartman. Ariel i llryan (s) 
Haskins. Thomas Bryan (s) 

Hatfield. Daniel Samuel 
Hawkins. George Allen, Jr. 

\W>t Virj: : I : \ •• - 

'Hawkins, Robert Cunningham (s) 
Hayes, I U 01 ge Knlghl 

Hayes. Man Tir/.ah 

'Hayes, Myrtle Vance 

Hays. Jamefl Franklin 

Hays. Lucille Virginia Morgan 

Heber. Raymond John (n) 
Hedrick, Olej Poster 
•Heflin, Robert M. <-) 
Hefner, Helen Doll 
•Hefner. Ruth Tersie 
Helmbright, Louis Patrick (c) 

'Helmick, Chester IfcCracken (s) 

♦Hemphill. Ralph Homer (s) 
tHenderson, James Lawn :. 
•Henry, George Florls 

Henry. Jacques 

Henry, James Charles 
•Henry, Kathleen Virginia 

Henry. Otto Hazelton (c) 

Henson, Eleanor Elisabeth 

•Heres. Amador Muniz (c) 
Herndon, Chester Crane (n) 
♦Herring. William Lawn 
Hersman. Marion Rockateller 
Benlah Ann 

- l/llel 

Harold Clan 
Hess. Nelle Craven 
•Hess, Paul Rex (s) 
•Hetherington, Alfred Edwin (s^ 
Hicks. Ait 'a Hudora 
*Hicks. Dana Minter (c) 
'Higgs, Man Rachel 
Hijikata. Kurazo (c) 
Hill. Charles Montgomery 
•Hill. George Wilbur (s) 
Hill. Gladys Sykes 

•Hill. Louis Hi 

Hill. Norma Ruth Barrett 

Hill. William Everett (-) 

' I • 
Hiner, Ralph McClung 
•Hinkle. Joseph Ernest (s) 



Cumberland, Md 


-. B 


Clarksburg 


1 1 a m b 


Cottageville 


Jun . A B 


Morgan town 


' 


Wheeling 




Charleston 


lSt Vr M 


Parkersburg 


B.8.C i ■: 


- 




Fairmont 




Morgantown 




Lewisburg 


Jun A l: 


Lewisbnrg 


A B 


Weston 


Soph . a B 


Glenville 


' 


New Martinsville 


Fr.. A B 


Brushy Run 


Jun . a8 C B 


Craft on 


\ i: 


Craft on 


A B 


Craft on 


Fr.. A B. 


Wheeling 


Soph.. US 1 


Pinto, Md. 


Fr.. B S E E 


Moundsi llle 


Fr.. L S c B 


Alexander, Pa, 


r A B 


South Charleston 


Fr. B.S M B 


dies. Franc 


Special a 1 B 


Wheeling 


Fr.. A B 


Clarksburg 


A B 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.M E 


Hunker Hill 


A B. 


Anmoore 


B B M E 


Terra Alt a 


Soph., A B. 


rs Alt a 


Fr.. F. S M F 


< hrantsville 


Fr.. Al! 


Mannington 


Soph . B.S H F 


Clarksburg 


Fr.. A.R. 


Mannington 


Jun.. A.B. 


Mannington 


Fr.. A B 


Fairmont 


Fr.. F. 8 F F 


Monongahela, Fa. 


Fr.. F. S M F 


Webster Springs 


Fr.. A B. 


Webster 8pr 


Fr.. A F. 


Parsonj 


Fr.. A F. 


Kokura. Japan 


Sen . B.S E M 


Charleston 


s,»ph.. F. s E f 


Fairmont 


- 


Clarksburg 


Fr . A B 


Charleston 


Fr.. B S F F 


Middlebourne 


Jun.. US!! F 


Middlebourne 


■ 




V: Med 






Franklin 


1st Yr. I~aw 


Clarksburg 


Fr. FS M F 



t Dec 



112 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



Hively, John Thurman (s) Charleston 

Hoard, Arthur Wayne (c) Pt. Marion, Pa. 

Hoard, Elma Morgantown 

B.Sc., West Virginia University, 1918. 

Hobensack, Clarice Sarah Columbus, O. 

B.S., Ohio Stute University, 1918. 

Hock, Nelle Mildred Bluefield 

Hodges, Mabel Clare Morgantown 

B.Sc., West Virginia University. 1P1-2. 



♦Hoffman, Arthur Riverton (s) 
Hoge, Elizabeth Stewart 
Hoge, Mary Rhinehart 
Hogg, William Bennett (s) 
Hogue, Frank William (s) 
Holbert, Hayward Janes (s) 
Holliday, Custer Bryan 
*Honaker, Harold Rodney (c) 
Honaker, Hedley Howard (s) 
Hood, Marjorie Belle 
♦Hoover, John Clay (s) 
Hoover, Wendell Webster 
♦Hopkins, John Franklin 
Hopkins, Martin Francis (s) 
Hough, Scott (c) 
♦Howard, Ruth Anne 
Howell, Eva Maude 
Howell, Harold Harry (n) 

Huddleston, Willia Macie 
Hudson, Eunice Snyder 
Huff, Shady Snow 
Huffner, Flo Elizabeth 
Hughes, Eva Florence 
Hull, Maud 

Hulley, Karl Kelchner (n) 
♦Humphrey, Herbert Leroy (s) 
♦Hungerford, Frank Lee (s) 
Hupp, John Clemens 

A.B., West Virginia Universi 
Hursey, Warren Sangston (s) 
Hutchinson, Sarah Emma 



Charleston 

Morgantown 

Waynesburg, Pa. 

Point Pleasant 

Fairview 

Fairmont 

Parkersburg 

Matoaka 

Matoaka 

Rivesville 

Webster Springs 

Webster Springs 

Moundsville 

Cameron 

Wellsburg 

Cowen 

Philippi 

Philippi 

Oak Hill 
Morgantown 
Burnt House 
Cameron 
Parkersburg 
Freemansburg 
Philippi 
Wheeling 
Oak Hill 
Morgantown 
ty, 1918. 

Shinnston 
Cameron 



Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 

2nd Yr. Med. 

Grad. A. & S. 

Soph., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Fr., B.S.M.E. 

Jun., A.B. 

Fr., A.B. 

1st Yr. Law 

Soph., A.B. 

Fr., A.B. 

Fr., B.S.E.M. 

Fr., B.S.E.M. 

Fr., A.B. 

Fr., A.B. 

Fr., A.B. 

Sen., A.B. 

Fr., B.S.M.E. 

Soph., B.S.C.E. 

Soph., A.B. 

Fr, A.B. 

Soph., A.B. 

Sen., A. & S. & 

2nd Yr. Med. 
Soph.. B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.Agr. 

Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Jun., A.B. 



Ice, Herschel Conaway (s) 
Inskeep, Philip Wilson, Jr. (s) 



Fairmont 
Moorefield 



Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 



tJack, William Henry, Jr. Weston 

♦Jackson, James Addison (s) Jane Lew 

Jaco, Jesse Miller Morgantown 

♦Jarrell, Milton (s) Oak Hill 

♦Jeffreys, Edna Frances Logan 

♦Jividen, Clyde Buxton (s) Hartford 

John, Brinley (s) Morgantown 

Johnson, David Morrison (s) Keyser 

Johnston, Olive Mae Morgantown 



Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Jun., A.B. 

B.S.C.E. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

Yr. Med. 



Fr., 
Fr., 
Fr., 
Fr., 
1st 



Fr., A.B. 



t Deceased. 



Lbt 01 S 






Johnston, Rebecca Elizabeth 
Johnston, Ruth Helene 
Jolliffe. James Edmund (c) 
Jolliffe. Mary Bather 

Jones, Alt a Flora 

Jones, Dorothy Delmonde 

♦Jones, Harold Gale 

•Jones. Howard Winston (s) 

•Jones, Hugh Eckera (c) 

Jones. Lucy Kleanor 
•Jones. Robert Elias (a) 
Jones. Victor Raymond 
Jones, William Donald 
Jones. William Samuel 
Jnergens, James Samiud 

Kaltenbach, Clifton Joaepb (a) 

Kaltenbach. Francis CecU I 

•Kaufman. Robert Longbrake (i 

Kayser. Fayne Albert (a) 
Keefer. Charlea Albert. Jr. (s) 
Keefer. Mildred Clayton 
Keefer. William Francis 
•Keener. Res blcCellean (s) 
•Keeseeker. Ward Wilbur (s) 
Keller. Elva Virginia 
•Kelley, Albert Lee fs) 
Keiiey. Grace Gertrude 
•Kelley, Samuel Frederick (s) 
Kelly. Ardatay Clara 
•Kennedy. Katie Marguerite 
•Kennedy. Royce Wilbert (s) 
•Keough. Edward John (n) 
Kerkhoff. Edward Milton | 
l. Charles Royal] (n) 

•K.-ssler. Daniel Clyde (s) 
Keys. Florence Rebecca 

A Colle 

Keys. Roy Cleyon (s) 
*Klger, Clem Bryan (n) 
Kiger, Certrude Elizabeth V, 
Kimmel. Dorothy 
Kimmel. Harriet Isabel 
Kimmins. Helen Louise 
•Kincaid. Leeter Henderaon (a) 

Kincaid. Kalph Templet, > n \ 

•Kindelberper, Charlea Edward (a) Wheeling 

King. Orr Rufua (a) 

•Kirchncr. Wilson Frank (s) 
•Kirkland. Clark H. (a) 
•Kirkland. Cline Alexander (>) 
•Kirkland. Matt LockwOOd (s) 

•Kisei-. ivan Boyce (a) 

Klaw. Abel 

- 



Cheat 


.: a 1 B 


Morgantown 


Fr. A 15 


Morgan to wo 


s«»ph.. B.S.E i: 


ran town 


9 H E 


Morgantown 


Soph . A i; 


Bel in- 


Jun . A i: 


Mannlngton 


\ i: 


lin-; 


Fr.. 


Fairmont 




Smithton 


A B 


Fairmont 


Fr.. BS M K 


Moundsville 


Fr. B.S.Ch E 


New Cumberland 


A B 


Morgantown 


•i . A B 


m 


1 


Wheeling 


Fr.. B.S.C B 


I in-: 


\ B 


Maninsburi: 


Fr.. B.S M E. 


Clarkaburg 


Fr.. A B 


Craft on 


Fr.. All 


Craft on 


Sen.. A B 


Wheel in-: 


Fr.. A B 


Brave. 1' | 


Fr.. A B 


Hedpesville 


1 1 S B K 


Morgantown 


Sen.. B S Acr. 


Fairmont 


Fr.. B.S.M E. 


Blacksville 


Soph.. A B. 


Catawba 


Fr.. B.S M E 


irllle, i' 


Soph.. A.B. 


Sabraton 


Fr.. A B 


Reader 


Fr.. aS B E 


Martinsville 


Fr.. B S M E 


Wheeling 


Fr.. B.8.C B 


Ripley 


Sen . A a 




2nd Yr. Med 


Weston 


Fr.. B S M E 


- intown 


Grad a ft 8 


i 




Salem 


Fr.. B S 


New Martinsville 


Fr.. B B M E 


Morgantown 


D . BS H E 


Craft on 


.Tun . HSli E 


Craft on 


Soph., B.S.H B 


Elm c 


Fr. A B 


Mul vane 


Fr.. B B Ch E. 


Summersville 


Fr.. B.S.C E 


lint: 


Fr. B.8.C B 


Weatoo 


Boph A B 


Middlebou 


Fr.. B > E E 


Martinsville 


Fr.. B S M E 


New Martinsville 


B.S.M E 


NOW Martinsville 


Fr.. BS M E 


Huntington 


- 


Palm 


Yr Uw 



tu 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



*Klaw, Fred Raymond 
Klug, Thomas Michael (s) 
♦Knight, James Farrell 
♦Knight, James Lloyd (s) 
Knight. John Jarrett 
Knode, George Thomas (s) 
Knode, William F., Jr. 
♦Knopp, Virgil Sylvester (s) 
♦Knott, Dewey Schley (s) 
Koletka, Elizabeth May 
Koontzy, James William 
Kraus, John Andrew (s) 
Kuhn, Ernest Guy 
Kyle, Karl Byron 

Laas, Albert William 
♦Laing, James Tamplin (n) 
♦Lake, Dorsey James (s) 
♦Lanham, Rex Eugene (s) 
Lantz, Florence Missouri 
♦Lantz, Rilla Phyllis 
Lantz, Robert Curtis (s) 
♦La Poe, Albert Edward (c) 
Largent Mary 
Lathem Claude Aubra 
Latta James Bullen 
Latterner John Basil (s) 
♦Lawson Lee Winston (s) 
♦Lazarus, Maurice Julius (s) 
Lazzell, Rufus Glenn (s) 
Lazelle, Donald Grant 
Lemley, Clark Frank (s) 
Lentz, Joseph Howard 
♦Leonard, Arlie Edward (s) 
Le Pera, Frances Margarita 
Leurant, Emile (s) 
Levin, Sydney (s) 
Lewis, Charles Leonard (s) 
Lewis, Stella Mabel 
Licklider, Bessie Butler 
♦Lightburn, Joseph Benton (s) 
Limerick, Ida Fitzhugh 
♦Limerick, Charles Thomas (c) 
Limprecht, Elwood George 

1B.1S., M.E., University of 
Liston, Jesse Earl 
Liter, Robert Edwin (s) 
♦Little, Alexander Porter (n) 
♦Lively, Frederick (s) 
♦Livezey, Halard Michael (n) 
♦Loar, Charles William (s) 
Loehr, Louise Mae 
Long, Eugene Homer 
Long, Ruth Cecile 
Lorentz, James Berry (s) 
Lorentz, Mary Bell 



Fairmont 


Fr., A.B. 


Proctor 


1st Yr. Med. 


Fairmont 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Lewis 


Fr., A.B. 


Lewis 


Jun., B.S.M.E. 


Shepherdstown 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairview 


Jun, B.S.C.E. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Elkins 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Huntington 


Sen., A.B. 


New Martinsville 


Fr., A.B. 


Weston 


Fr., A.B. 


Mannington 


Soph., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


3rd Yr. Law 


Benwood 


Sen., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Grafton 


Fr., A.B. 


Independence 


Fr., A.B. 


Jacksonburg 


Sen., A.B. 


Jacksonburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Davis % 


Fr.. A.B. 


Pt. Marion, Pa. 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Paw Paw 


Jun., A.B. 


Ravenswood 


1st Yr. Med. 


Washington, D. C. 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.C.E. 


Williamson 


Fr., A.B. 


Belington 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


3rd Yr. Law 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


New Martinsville 


Soph., B.S.C.E. 


Grafton 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Pt. Marion, Pa. 


Special Eng'g. 


Cleveland, Ohio 


1st Yr. Med. 


Charleston 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Sutton 


Sen., A.B. 


Shepherdstown 


Fr., A.B. 


Jane Lew 


Fr.. B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Cameron 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Bisbee, Ariz. 


Grad. A. & S. 


Colorado, 19-12. 




Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.Agr. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Bramwell 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


St. Albans 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


New Martinsville 


Soph., A.B. 


Bluefield 


2nd Yr. Law 


Ravenswood 


Fr., A.B. 


Sutton 


Soph., B.S.C.E. 


Wheeling 


Special A. & S. 



I IF Sri DENTS 



31 



Loudin, Sallie 1 
Louprh, Arthur Harvey (.-) 
Low*. Clarence Kay (a) 
Lowry, Thomas Frederick (a) 

•Lowther, Paul Maiden (a) 
•Lowther. William Paul (n) 

Loyd, Benjamin Frank 
•Lucas. Percy Earl (■) 

•Ludwitf, Robert Eugene (n) 
Luke, James Preston (a) 
•Luke, John Whelan (s) 
Lynch. Herda Part" I 
•Lyons. Nathaniel Swing (s) 

MacDannold, Myrtle 
MacTaggart, William Paul 
Madden, Clyde Richard 

•Marten. Donald Prner (s) 
•Mahaney. Clarence Russ.ll (a) 
Malloy. John Paul 
Malone. Paul Karl 
Mantz. Frank Parritt 
Mareau. William Edward (8) 

llarkey, Jogepfe Benson (a) 

Marr. Norval Mason (s) 
Marshall. Karl Lyon (s) 
♦Marshall. Samuel (s) 
Martin. Archie Glenn 
•Martin, Donald Glenden (a) 
Martin. Cert rude 
Martin, ('.race ai 

♦Martin. Homer Cheater (8) 
•Martin, Hugh Hums 
•Martin. James Cogan (s) 
Martin. Lucille Wilson 
Martin. Mary Martha 
•Martin. Russell Harr> 
•Martin. Thomas RnaaeU (a) 
Mason. Cloyd Alton (c) 
Mason. Wayne Kldon (s) 

Masters. Paul Edward 
'Mateer, Tobias Snyder (s) 

Matheson. Kosarii Marie 
•Matthews. Arnold Loss (s) 

Mattingly, Bmma Pauline 

Mauzy. Michael Harper (C) 
Maxwell. Cyrus Raymond, Jr. 
Maxwell. George Ralph (a) 

•Mayfield. John Carhton 

Mayfield, Madge Emmeraon 
Mayfield, Merle Carter 
McBee, alfn d Roy (s) 
McBee, Lena Griffin 
McCamey, John Donkh 






Morgantoa n 

ant own 

Athens 

Paden Citv 

Mt. Clare 
Mannington 

Sutton 

Grafton 

k. j 

New Cumberland 

Charles Town 
Wolf Summit 
Cans. Pa. 

P« nil- 

Beckley 

Shinm 

Oakland. Md. 
Cumberland. Md. 

Weaton 
ton 
Martinaborg 

Fax etteville 

Parkereburg 
Barnaley, Pa. 
Morgantown 

Min^o 

Worthington 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 

Shinnston 

Charleston 

PannJngton 

Flkins 
•on 

iborg 

Shinnston 
i die 

Klkins 
Moundsville 

Mannington 
Hambleton 
Mm gantown 
Farmington 
Morgantown 

Franklin 

Morgantown 
Mm gantown 
Middlebonrne 

.intown 

Morgantown 
Flemington 

ant own 
Sisters\ die 



A P. 

a 

A B 
1 1 s m i ; 

A I! 

A B 

a i; 

p. s m i: 
. A p.. 



Jun 
Fr.. 

Jun 



\ B 
Soph. B.S.C E 
; a. i S 

\ B 
Fr.. B.S.C i: 
Fr.. B.8 M i: 

PS.Ch.F. 
Fr., BAC E 
Fr.. B S E i: 

LB. 
Soph.. P.S.Ch.F. 

i'-K.M. 
Fr.. I 

A B. 
Fr.. A P 

LB. 
Soph.. A.B. 
Fr.. B.S.C K 
Fr.. B.S.C K 
Fr., B B M K 

A B 
Jun.. A P.. 
Fr.. i - 

B S M F 

: I s m B. 

Fr.. A P 
Fr.. B.8 C F 

BJ3 M E. 
Jun.. A B 
Fr.. P. S ! 

LB 
\ B 
Fr. I 

Soph \ B 
Fr.. A P 
Fr.. B.S H.K 

Ben . a B 

Fr. 



816 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



McCarnes, Allan Hunter (s) 
McCaskey, Mildred 
♦McCauley, William Deles (s) 
McCleary, Edna May 
McClue, Arthur Eugene (s) 
McClung, James Robert (c) 
McClure, Andrew Robert (c) 
McCombs, Ruth Eliza 
McConnell, Margaret Ethel 
McCoy, Fred Jefferson 
McCoy, George Talbott 
McCue, John Bruce (s) 
*McCue, Ruth 
McDaniel, Floyd (s) 
♦McDaniel, John Donley (s) 
McDermott, John Peter (s) 
McDonald, Paul Dane (s) 
McDonald, Verda Blanche 
♦McFarland, Daniel Willard 
McGahan, Mortimer Lee (s) 
McGannon, Bernard Alysius (s) 
McGary, George Bryan 
McGinnis, Russell Smith (s) 

McGovran, Victoria Electa 
McGranahan, Alice Virginia 
♦McGraw, Arno William 
McGraw, Harry (n) 
McGrew, Harry Browning (s) 
McHale, Edward Francis 
Mclntire, Mont M. (s) 

Mcintosh, Frederick Frelinghuysen Spencer 

McKee, John McDonald Triadelphia 

McKee, Kirkland Sheperd Shepherdstown 

McKenzie, Thomas Fulton (s) New Cumberland 

McKinley, Virginia Louise Morgantown 

McLain, Henry McColloch (s) Elm Grove 

McMasters, William Ward (s) MoundsvilLe 

McMillen, Frank Vincent (s) Masontown 

♦McMillen, Robert Henry (s) Masontown 

McMillion, Guy Edward (s) Summersville 

McMurrer, Clement Anthony (s) Mannington 

♦McNeely, Alta Rebecca Fairmont 

♦McNeil, Paul Moore (s) Sutton 

McNeill, Verdie Elizab. Genevieve Morgantown 

♦McParland, Michael Augustine (s) Gary 

♦McWhorter, Samuel Burdette (s) Charleston 



Middlebourne 

New Martinsville 

Moorefield 

Sherrard 

Clarksburg 

Nitro 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Sistersville 

Sistersville 

Persinger 

Muddlety 

Williamson 

Kingwood 

Cameron 

Flemington 

Morgantown 

Ravenswood 

Clarksburg 

Wheeling 

Moundsville 

Harrisville 

Charleston 

Wheeling 

Parkersburg 

Follansbee 

Huntington 

Elkins 

Morgantown 



Meador, Ray 

♦Melman, Abram Samuel (n) 



Hinton 
Charleston 



Mendelsohn, Rudolph Herman (c) Frostburg, Md. 



Mercer, Merwyn Devern (s) 
Meredith, Cora 
Meredith, Kate 



New Cumberland 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 



Jun., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
2nd Yr. Law 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.Ch.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr.. A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Sen., A. & S. and 

2nd Yr. Med. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 
Special A. & S. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.H.E. 
Jun., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., B.S.Agr: 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
1st Yr. Phar. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Grad.. A. & S. 



A.B., West Virginia University, 1916. 



■ - 






•Meredith. Mildred 
Meredith. Kola Alice 
•Meredith, Russell Dell 
Metz, Roy DeYaughan (c) 
Michael. Myrtle Ellen 
•Michie. Arthur Thornton 
Miles. French Lovett I 
Miller. Alvin Martin 
Miller. Blanche Bonsack 

Miller, Charles Howard 
Miller. Charles Bprigg 
Miller. Fred Lotha: 
Miller, Harold Clayton 

•Miller. Joseph Ralph 
Miller. Leroy Brook- 
•Miller, Rufus Glenn (s) 
Miller. Ruth 

•Miller. William Dewey (n) 
Milligan. Lillie Margaret 
Mills. Frederick Willard 
Minor. Charles Donhani (s) 
•Minor, Hunter Gould 
Mish. Helen Elizabeth 
•Mitchell. James William (s) 
Mohler. Hugh Lee (s) 
Moler. Raleigh Miller 
•Moler. Wallace McClure 
Mooney. I>aura Margaret 
Mooney. Mary Fra~ 
Moore. Charles Edgar 
Moore. Dana Trescott 

re, Joseph Burley (s) 
Moore, Martha Margaret 
Moore, Mary Elizabeth 
Moore. R. Olive 

Granville OolJope, 
•Moran. Thomas Nelson 
Moran. Walter Harrison (s) 
Moreland. Brady Belle 
Morgan. Alfred (s) 
Morgan. Cuba Lodema 
Morgan, Douglas Davidson (n» 
•Morgan. Emily Josephine 
'Morgan, Jean: 
Morgan, William Haze (n) 
'Morgan, William I 
•Morley. Burton Raymond (s) 
Morris. Alice Dulaney 
Morris. Branson I 
Morris. Emily Susan 
•Morris. Russell Alger 
Morris. Thomas John 
•Morris. Warren Francis | 
Morrison. Marshall Jackson (S) 



Fairmont 




antown 




Fairmont 




Wall.. 


:i.. AH. 


Farmington 


5JLR 


Fairmont 


3 


Buckhannon 


Soph.. D - 


Jeannette 


Soph . P. S M E 


Eglon 






2nd Yr 


Masontown. Pa. 


Fr.. A I; 


Terra Alia 


Jun A B. 


Cameron 


Fr.. A B 


Eglon 






2nd Yr 


Fairmont 


Fr.. A I: 


Morgantown 


Fr.. A i: 


Kingwood 


Ft.. B.S.< i: 


-antown 


Soph.. A.B. 


Pike 


Fr.. B ELM H 


Marlinton 


Soph.. A B 


-er 


Vr Phar. 


Morgantown 


Soph.. A B 


Clay 


Fr.. 


Bunker Hill 


Jun.. A.I' 


Martins Ferry. Ohio 


Fr.. B.S.M B 


-er 


9 E K 


Harpers Ferry 


1st Yr. Med. 


Shenandoah Junction 


Fr.. B.S.M .E. 


Bluefield 


Soph.. R.S.H.K 


BluefWld 


Soph.. R.S.IIK 


Morgantown 


Jun. A.B. 


Morgantown 


i 


Middlebourne 


Fr B S.M K 


• Alexander, i 


Soph.. A.B. 


Ke>> 


h .. A.B. 


Fairchance, Pa. 




Fairmont 


A B 


Fairmont 


Sen.. A.B. 


Rom my 


Fr.. A B 


Grafton 


h.. A.B. 


S: Marys 


as h k. 


Train 


Fr.. B B M K 


Morgantown 


Fr.. PS H E 


Mannington 


Fr.. A B 


Clarksburg 


Fr.. A B 


Albright 




Charleston 


Fr. B B 


Harrisvilh' 


\ B 


Mannincrron 




Cumberland. Md. 




lie 


M E 


Enten 


Fr.. • 


Martinsville 


Fr B B E M 


Salem 


Fr 






HIS 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



Morrow, Julius Floyd (s) 
Morton, Mayme Edith 
Mosiman, Alma Esther 
Muhleman, Gladys Grey 
♦Mullan, George Oscar (s) 
♦Mullen, George Cecil (s) 
Mullen, Robert Emmett (s) 
Mullenix, Harnus Pearson (s) 

A. IB., West Virginia 
Mullin, Ethel June 
Munroe, Gilbert Cameron (s) 
Murphy, Earl John 
♦Murphy, Herbert Mark (n) 
Murphy, Isaac Raymond (s) 
♦Murphy, Victor Byrne (s) 
♦Myers, Ellen Lenora 
Myers, Emma Frances 
♦Myers, Ira Odell (c) 
Myers, James Howard (c) 
Myers, Karl Johnson (s) 
Mynes, Leo Howard (s) 



Nagano, Kazuma (c) 

Nale, Thomas William, Jr. (s) 

Nease, George Russell (s) 

♦Nease, Gifford Stuart (n) 

Neely, Forest Hunter 

Neff, Charles Thompson, Jr 

Nefflen, Paul Ewald 

Nefflen. William Elliott 

♦Nelson, Ray Charles (s) 

♦Nelson, Valfred Leonard (s) 

♦Neuenschwander, Paul Wells (s) 

Newcome, James Arthur (s) 

Newman, Mae 

Ney, Glenn Morris 

Noland, Violet Pearl 

Norman, Elsie Mae 

♦Nugent, Norman Henry 

Nurse, Weir Cecil 

Nutter, Darrel Glenn (s) 



Och, Albert Edward 
♦Olson, Albert Edwin (s) 
♦Organ, Nelle Lillian 
♦Orndorff, Kathryn Lucile 
Orr, Mary 
Orth, John Malcolm 

A. B., West ViTginia 
Osborne, Glenna 
Ott, Grace De Vore 
Otto, Julia Elizabeth 
Ours, Lester (s) 
Overholt, George Guy (s) 
Owen. Thelma Viola 
♦Owens, Ivan Clarke (s) 



West Alexander, Pa. 


1st Yr. Med. 


Webster Springs 


Sen., A.B. 


Falls City, Neb. 


Fr., A.B. 


New Martinsville 


Fr., A.B. 


Piedmont 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Huntington 


Fr., A.B. 


Huntington 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


I Elkins 


Grad., A. & S. 


University, 1915. 




Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Mannington 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B. 


Clay 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Philippi 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Clay 


Fr., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Summersville 


Sen., A.B. 


Grafton 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Martinsburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Philippi 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Takaoka, Japan 


Jun., A.B. 


) Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Letart 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Fairmont 


Soph., B.S.M.E. 


(s) Piedmont 


1st Yr. Med. 


Elkins 


Soph., B.S.Agr. 


Keyser 


Jun., A.B. 


Martin, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


) Fenwick 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


s (s) Sistersville 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Keyser 


Soph., A.B. 


Huntington 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


1st Yr. Phar.' 


Davis 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Spencer 


Sen., A.B. 


L~d>:ewood. R. I. 


Fr., A.B. 


Decatur, Neb. 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Pennsboro 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B. 


Davis 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Elm Grove 


Fr., A.B. 


Romney 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Charleston 


1st Yr. Law 


University, 1917. 




Griffithsville 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Petersburg 


1st Yr. Med. 


Erwin 


Soph., A.B. 


Cumberland, Md. 


Fr., A.B. 


Ivan 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 



List of Sti d 



319 



Padden. Lawrence Chaiiea 
•Painter. John Wyaer (b) 
•Palmer, Williard < hren (a) 
Pancak*-, McDowell 
Park. Cheater llorland 
•Park. Robert Kirk 
•Parker, Paul Edward 
Parrish. Nolle L- • 
Parry. John Adolphus (a) 

ma. Harold Herbert (si 

Pastor, Jos»> Rodriguea 

•Patt. Ralph (a) 
•Patteson. Julian Char!' 
Patterson. Maude AHender 
•Pauley, Earle William (a) 
Payne, Orace Fleming 
Payne, John Edward (a) 
Pearcy. Ethel 

•Pell. William Thomas (n) 
Peterson. Arthur Horn (s) 
Pettry. Quy Carleton I 
♦Pew. Noel Lorenti 
Pfost. Donald Monroe (a) 
Philips. Earl Strawn (s) 
•Phillips. Cecil Warner (s) 
Pippin, Irene Mae 
Pitzenbarger. Ira Albert (a) 
•Plttaford, Columbus cviic (i 
Pitzer. John Hens. 1 
•Poffenbarger. Perry Simpson 
Poling, Lawrence Edward (n) 
Poole. Helen Fleming 
•Porter. Gobel (n) 
Porter. Jean Williamson 

Porter. Lloyd Qarriaon 
t*Porterfield, Jamei M 
a. Beulah Martha 
a b 
Powell, Mars 
Pownall. Helen Hani. 
Prather, Fonao 

Pratr. Flizahnn Lorraine 

Martha Pauline 
•Pratt. Thomas Klkins (s) 

PrelBer, Benjamm (a) 

I'ri' iise 

Price. Arthur Clyde (c) 
Price, Darrell Ruggiero 
Price, John Raymond (a) 
Price, Margaret Randolph 
Price, I ttella 

Price. Paul Holland 
Price. William Spencer 



Bd| 


Soph . A B 


oak Hill 


Fr.. B B 1 B 


Bmlthfleld, 1 




Romnej 




Farming ton 


Fr .. A I: 


enawood 


Fr.. BJSA 


Clarkaburg 




Morgan town 


Jun . A 


Hinton 


Fr . A i: 


Terra A 


A R 


•■>. P B 


R S | 




Med 


Morgantown 


Fr. 


Charleston 




Morgantown 


Special 


:ton 


Fr.. R S L L 


i Ule 


Jun.. A P. 


Clarkaburg 


Soph . A R 


Clarkaburg 


Special A a 


Fairmont 


Fr. 


Romnej 


Fr.. B S B B 


Vaneeburg, Ky. 


Fr A R 


Pennsboro 


Fr.. Il.S.M K 


Spencer 




Pine Rank, Pa. 


Fr 


sona 


Fr.. RS M L 


Morgantown 


Fr.. A i: 


Pool 


Fr.. R S B V 


Charleaton 


- 


• Inaburg 


Jun.. RS.E B 


(n) Charleston 


Fr. RS E L\ 


Philippi 


Fr.. R.S ML 


Fairmont 


Fr.. A P. 


Kern 


Fr.. P. S M K 


oak Hill 


Soph.. RSII K 


oak Hill 


- 'hF. 


Marttnaburg 


1.C K 


Morgantown 


Crad A 






Morgantown 


Jun.. A 


Kej 


•: A R 


Juna 


ph., A.R. 


Morgantown 


Fr.. A B 


Morgantown 


H. 


Deep Valley 


Fr a B 


Charleston 




Marl in ton 


. A P. 


Bmlthfleld 


Fr.. P. S E B 


ton 


M B 


Morgantown 




rlinton 




Morgantown 


A P. 


Morgantown 


- 


Morgantown 


Bfa . B B M E 






:20 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



Prichard, May Eula Morgantown 

Pride. Cecil Ben Parkersburg 

Prince, Elmer Woodward (c) Morgantown 

Proudfoot, Geraldine Minnora 



Jun., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 



Raemsch, Lawrence Edwin Elkins 

Rafferty, Marcellus Thomas (s) Wheeling 

♦Ramsburg, George Ferdinand (s) Weston 

Randall, Estelle Ebert Shinnston 

Randall, George Fleming (s) Shinnston 

Ransom, Floyd Howard (s) Wheeling 

♦Read, Thomas Leigh Hinton 

♦Reed, James Leeman (s) Auburn 

Reed, James Madison Morgantown 
B. Sc West Virginia University, 1918. 



Reed, Orville Edward (s) 
Reed, Thomas Brackett (s) 
Reeder, Benjamin Garnet 
Reeves, Sara Alta 
Reid, Roswell Schell 
♦Rexroad, Melvin Balser (s) 
Reynolds, Kathryn Suit 
♦Reynolds, Knight (s) 
Reynolds, Vivian Gordon 
♦Rhorabough, Thomas Albert 
Rice, Harold Alston 
Rice, Worth Kirkwood 
♦Richards, George Cochran (c) 
♦Richards, Lionel Kenneth (n) 
Richards, Margaret Dickey 
Richardson, Charles Joseph (n) 
Riddle, Walter 



Terra Alta 

Clay 

Salem 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Keyser 

Keyser 

Grafton 

Belington 

Berkeley Springs 

Berkeley Springs 

Piedmont 

Parkersburg 

Fairmont 

Sistersville 

Morgantown 



A.B., West Virginia University, 1917. 



Ridenour, Rosco Sharpes 
♦Riffe, Mary Stuart 
Riffle, George Newcomer (c) 
Riggle, Donald Laughlin 
Riggle, Harold Engle (s) 
Riggle, Hubert Lee (s) 
Riggle, Herman Bee (s) 
Riggs, Cecil Orval (s) 
Riggs, Frances Mildred 
Riggs, Isaac Larkin 
Righter, Luther Smith 
Rinehart, Garnette 
Ritchie, William Smith (s) 
Roach, Harold Hervey (s) 
Roach, Heber Carlton (s) 
Roberts, James Egbert (s) 
Roberts, Margaret Clara 
Robertshaw, Eugene Stanley (s) 
Robey, Francis Webster (s) 
♦Robey, John Morgan (s) 
Robinson, Clara Lenore 
Robinson, Ethel Board 



Farmington 

Hinton 

McClellandtown, 

Middlebourne 

Middlebourne 

Middlebourne 

Middlebourne 

Moundsville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Bridgeport 

Weston 

Ravenswood 

New Cumberland 

Wolf Summit 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Wallace 

Lowsville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 



Pa. 



Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Grad A. & S. 

Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
A.B. 
A.B. 
A.B. 

B.S.M.E. 
A.B. 
B.S.M.E. 
A. & S. 



Jun 

Fr., 

Fr., 

Fr., 

Sen., 

Soph. 

Grad. 



Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 

B.S.Agr. 

A.B. 
A.B. 

B.S.C.E. 

A.B. 

B.S.M.E. 

A.B. 



Fr., 
Fr., 
Sen 
Fr., 
Fr., 
Fr., 
Fr., 



Soph., B.S.H.E. 



s 






Robinson, Larlin Hurl (s) Klkins 

Roby, Clarem e P»-t.-r>burg 
Rodgers, Ira Errett I -any 

Ropers. Margaret Neville Morgantown 

•Rollyson, Ernest Gilbert I S.-rvia 

•Romisch. Amon L»-wis (s) Morgantown 

Roome, Elisabeth Bistersville 

Ropp, Clarence Daniel Luther Martinsburg 

pRoeenberger, James Madison <>> Beliogtoo 

PRoaenbergar, Ifinnlai Clay («) Belington 

teothliaberger, Floyd Frederick Martinsville 

Rouzer. Paul Cnarlea Morgantown 

University of W 

•Rowland. Joseph Kins (s) I'nnct'ton 

Russell. Arthur Lawrence (s) Fairmont 

Rutherford. John Mateer (s) Cambridge, Ohio 

•Ryan. Paul Francis (s) Mannington 

Rymer. Nelle Barbara Middlebourne 



- I L 

Jun.. A.B. 
Soph.. A B 
Fr.. B.8.C E 
M E 

A B 

a a 

A B 



Fr . 
Jun 
Jun 



I B 

Soph . B 8 E E 
B.8.CE 
B.8.H.E 



•Saffel. Hollie Olen (■) 
Sallade. Portia Lillian 
•Salvati, Leo Harry 
Salvati. Raymond Earnest (s) 
Sanborn. Paul Hugo 
Sander. Christian. Jr. 

i Virgin) 
Sanders. Joseph McDonald 
Sapp, Mary Louise 
Sarle, Charles Faye 

Cornell University 
Satterfield. Eugene Wade (s) 
Satterfield. Herman Beall (s) 
•Satterfield, Max (c) 
Sayre. Floyd McKinhy 
Sayre. Greek 

- nia Un 
t*Sbarske. Paul Ray 
Scarnecchia. Anthony 
•Schauwecker. Carl Milton (s) 
Schilling. John Griffith (s) 
Schroll. Alfred Caldwell 
Scott. Kathryn Virginia 
Scott. Lela Daton 
Scott, Mary Bernice 
Scott, Parry Mason (s) 
•Seibert. David Herr (s) 
•Selvey. Forest Edgar (8) 
Setron. Joseph Louis 
Sevy, Kelsey Albert I 
Sevy. Pansy T^orraine 
Shaffer, Harry Morse (s) 
Sheets. Lessie Lakin 
Sheffer. Ralph Lin 
•Shepherd. William Jan 



Philippi 

Berkeley Springs 
Moaoogab 

Monongah 
Huntington 
Wheeling 
a Univ. n 

Bluefield 
Morgantown 
Morgant "wn 
• 
Rivesville 
Parkersburc 
Rivesville 
Ripley 
Morgan town 

• nborn. Pa. 
Benwood 
Parkersburg 

Morgantown 

Wbeeling 

Charleston 
BecJdey 

Morgantown 

Iforgantown 

Mart ins burg 

Simpson 

Parkersburg 

Oak Hill 
Oak Hill 

Washington. I C 
Huntington 
Huntington 
P»nnsboro 



Fr.. B.S < 
\ B. 
Fr.. A.B. 
Fr.. B.S.C.E. 
Jun.. B.SJ 
■ 

l>t Yr. Law 
Fr.. A P. 
Grad 

Fr.. aac e 

Fr.. A .B. 

Jun.. 
Grad A 



Fr . 

2nd 

Fr.. 

Fr.. 

Fr 

Jun 

Ft. 

Sen 



E 

Yr Phar. 

' E 
A B 

E 
B.S.H K 
A.B. 
. A B 
Soph.. 

Fr.. B 8 E E 
Fr.. P. 8 C E 
Fr.. Use E 
Fr.. B.S.C.E. 

Soph . i;sHi: 

Soph.. 
I B 

Jun 

Ft.. Use E 



t Deo 



322 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



♦Shifflette, Harry Francis (s) 
Shirey, Willie Brown (n) 
Shore, Ernest Luke (s) 
Shoup, Sarah Elizabeth 
Showalter, William Boyd (s) 
Shugart, Gervis Gardner (c) 
♦Shumate, Ivan Oakley (s) 
Shurtleff, Mary McCulloh 
Shuttlesworth, Lucy Adline 
♦Sigler, Percy Allan (s) 
♦Simmons, Hazel Louise 
♦Sine, Hiram Kent (s) 
Sisler, James Donald (c) 
♦Skaggs, Pauline Thelma 
Skarzinski, Stanley John (s) 
♦Skinner, Frederick William (s) 
Skinner, James Marshall, Jr. (s) 
Slagle, Paris Carroll 
♦Slaven, Garnet Cosby 
Slemaker, Richard West (s) 
Smenner, Bessie 
Smith, Clara Mary 
♦Smith, Frank Beckley (s) 
♦Smith, Harold Guy (s) 
Smith, Howard Carrollton (s) 
♦Smith, Irvin Bell (n) 
♦Smith, James Harold (s) 
♦Smith, John Frank (s) 
Smith, Hattie May 
♦Smith, Kenneth Martin (s) 
Smith, Mary Elizabeth 
Smith, Rose Gertrude 
Smith, Uneva 
Snaith, Mary Virginia 
Snaith, Theresa Ora 
♦Snarr, John Maxwell (s) 
Snarr, Otto Welton 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1917. 
Snead. Virgil Francis (n) Beckley 

Snedeker, William Leroy Wheeling 

♦Snider, Charles Donald (s) Fairmont 

Snodgrass, Edmond J. Taylor (s) Pennsboro 
♦Snooks, John Rupert (s) Powellton 

Snyder, Edith Smithfield 

Snyder, Melvin Claude (s) Albright 

Snyder, Virginia Ruhamah Morgantown 

Sohn, Edward May (c) Williamson 

♦Sommer, Karl Frederick (s) Sutton 

Sommer, Paul Harrison (s) Sutton 

Sonderman, Hazel Margaret Wheeling 

Spahr, Ida May Kingwood 

Spangler, Robert Clifton Morgantown 

A.B'., Wast Virginia University, 1914; A.M., ibid., 1916. 
♦Spears, Marjorie Gail Elkins 

Spindler, Charles Hobart (s) Kingwood 

Springer, Albert Gail Morgantown 



Huntington 

Union 

Keyser 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Harpers Ferry 

Mt. Hope 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Piedmont 

Spencer 

Blacksville 

Morgantown 

Summersville 

Monongah 

Laredo, Texas 

New Martinsville 

Huntington 

Oak Hill 

Sistersville 

Cumberland, Md. 

Weirton 

Huntington 

Fairmont 

Grafton 

Fairmont 

Huntington 

Fairmont 

Flemington 

West Union 

Flemington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Weston 

Weston 

Romney 

Romney 



Fr., 

Fr., 

Jun. 

Fr. 

Fr. 

Fr. 



Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Fr. t A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

, A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr.. A.B. 
Soph., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 
Grad. A. & S. 

Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Special A. & S. 
Grad. A. & S. 

Fr., A.B. 
Ft., A.B. 
Sen*, B.S.Agr. 



Ian 01 Sti d 



:<23 



•Springer. Forrest Leslie (•) 

•Sprout. Esrom Fay (s) 
Staats, Hmrold Ashton (•) 
Btalnaker, Cecil Martin 
t'Stalnaker, John Franklin 
Btalnaker, Lillian 

Starkly. Shirley Inland 
Btealej, Frances Norton 

•Stealej, James BSdmond (s) 

Steele. Ethel 

:>leton. Archie M (s) 
Steinecke. Olga Emma 
Stemple, Isabel Catherine 
Stenger, Leo Edward (s) 
•Stephan. Einil. Jr. (s) 
•Stepp. Wilson (0) 
Stewart. Mary 
Stewart. Merrie Marguerite 
Stewart. Oris Cayh 
Stickler. Merton Harvy 
•Stillinus. Paul Van (s) 
Stobbs. Henry Alpheus (s) 
Stockert. Ida Clay 
Stoker, Ralph Jennings (s) 

Qe, Frederick And (c) 
Stone. Lillian Adams 
Stone. Louis Earl (n) 
Stout, Benjamin Mortimon 

Stout. Maiden Dallas (s) 
Straley. Joseph Floyd 
•Straughan. William Ernest (s) 
•Street. Clarence Cecil (s) 
Strickler. Elizabeth Blanche 
Strobel, Christine 
•Stroehmann. Harold John 
•StTOther, I)a\.d Hunter (c) 
Struthers. Minnie Harrison 
Stump, Golden June 
stump. Katherine Casey 
•Stump. Lorentz Kemper (n) 
Stump. Mary Virginia 
Stump. Noah Franklin (s) 
•Stump. Wilbur Dale (c) 
Sturbois. Julia 
Storgis, William Joseph 
Sturgiss. Helen Gould 
Sturm. Harry Gail 

Summers, Carrie Edna 

•Summers. Hu L. (n) 
Summers. Mary Louise 
Sutherland. Henry Bailey (c) 
Sutton. Lewis IfcMechan Jr (a) 



Fairmont 


Fr . A B 


Lumberport 


Fr . B S 1 I 


Ripley 


po . a B 


Parsons 




Charle 


Fr . B.8.C B 


ions 


Fr. 


aswood 


Jun . 1! B \ 


Clarksbnrg 


Bh . A B 


Clarksburg 


Fr.. B a C E 


ills 


1 : A.B. 


New M;ir':nsville 


Fr . B B 1 M 




Fr.. 


Am boy 


Soph . A B 


llorgantown 




Cumberland 


Fr . AC. 


Kermit 


Fr B B '"h.E. 


antown 


Fr.. A B 


Horgantown 


Jun.. A 


Clarksburg 


Soph.. B.S.Ch.E. 


Oak Hill 


Fr.. B.S.C.E. 


Blacksville 


Ft., a r. 


Ling 


Fr.. B.S.C.E. 


Burnsville 


Jun.. B.8 H E. 


Morgantown 


Jun.. B.S K E 


-antown 


Fr.. 


Martinsville 


Fr.. A.B. 


Mt. Hope 


Jun.. B.S K i; 


Clarksburg 


Sen.. A a: S. 




2nd Vr Med 


Clarksburg 


Jun.. All 


Weston 


Fr.. B.S E K 


Huntington 


Fr.. B.S.M H 


Ma sunt own 


Fr.. B > M K 


Ellenboro 


Ft.. HSU.K. 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B 


Wheeling 


Fr., B.S.M i: 


Charles Town 


Fr.. B.S.Ch K 


Oak Hill 


Fr.. A B 


Stumptown 


Fr.. A B 


Romney 


A.B. 


Philippi 


Fr.. B 9 H E 


Romney 


Fr.. B.S. H.E. 


Yoe. Pa. 


ph., A.B 


Charleston 


Fr.. B B ■ B 


Clarksburg 


Fr.. 


Fairmont 




WD 


Jun . A 


Enter pi 




Belinuton 


Fr. 


QlenTflle 


Fr.. B B B B 


Clay 


Soph . A B. 


bans 


Fr. A B 


Clarksburg 


Fr. 



t Dec 



124 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



♦Sweeney, Roy Crosier (s) 
♦Swiger, Lyle Ernest (s) 
Swiger, Rual Bower 
♦Swisher, John Beeghley (s) 
♦Swisher, Lewis C. (s) 
Swisher, Thomas Hyer (s) 
♦Switzer, JamesDonald (n) 

♦Tabler, Robert Allen (n) 
Talbott, Esker Wayne (c) 
Talbott, Samuel Ford 

♦Talkington, Dale 
Tanner, Gerald Darland 
Tapp, Helen Gladys 
Tarr, Helen Elizabeth 
♦Tavenner, Lewis N., Jr. (s) 
♦Taylor, Clarence Thiers 
Taylor, Harry Reeves 
Taylor, Lynn Arden 
♦Taylor, Ray Bernard (s) 
Theiss, John Otto (s) 
♦Thomas, Joseph Walker (c) 
Thomas, Margaret 
♦Thompson, Forest Rutledge (c) 
Thompson, Herbert Hudson 
Thompson, Howard Le Roy (s) 
Thompson, Marie 
Thornburg, Amos Addison 
Thornhill, Evelyn Ruth 
♦Thornton, King Noble (n) 
Tierney, Genevieve 
Tierney, Katheryn Stephanie 
Timms, James Oren (c) 
Toler, Jesse Lee (c) 
Tomkies, Douglas Christian 
♦Toothman, Richard Albert (s) 
♦Trainer, Gordon Reed (n) 
♦Tregellas, Harold Milton (s) 
♦Trembly, Chester Paul (s) 
♦Treweek, John Spargo (s) 
Trotter, Martha Elizabeth 
Trump, Frank Myers (n) 

Tucker, Eldon Bryant (n) 

♦Tucker, George Paul (s) 
Tucker, John Wyland (s) 
♦Tucker, Robert Clifford, Jr. (s) 
Tuckwiller, Rachel 
Turkovich, Mathew (s) 
♦Turner, Dale Gibson (s) 
Turner, Hobart Wesley 
Twyford, Mayme Lucinda 
Twyman, Russell Heavner (s) 
♦Tyler, Robert Perry (s) 



Charleston 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Fairmont 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Jane Lew 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Lost Creek 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Soph., B.S.M.E. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Philippi 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A. & S. 




2nd Yr. Med. 


Mannington 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Reedsville 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Elm Grove 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Keyser 


Fr., A.B. 


Masontown 


Soph., B.S.Agr. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Ravenswood 


1st Yr. Med. 


Fairmont 


Fr., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Spencer 


Jun., B.S.Agr. 


Clarksburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Belington 


Fr., A.B. 


Princeton 


Fr., A.B. 


Weston 


Sen., A.B. 


Weston 


Fr., A.B. 


Mannington 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Coalwood 


Fr., A.B. 


Hinton 


Soph., A.B. 


Rivesville 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Grafton 


Fr., A.B. 


Terra Alta 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Wheeling 


Ft., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Ft., A.B. 


Martinsburg 


Sen., A. & S. 




2nd Yr. Med. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A. & S. 




2nd Yr. Med. 


Fairmont 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Ft., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Lewisburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Monongah 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Mannington 


Fr., A.B. 


Weston 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


West Union 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Clarksburg 


Soph., B.S.M.E. 


Freeman 


Fr., B.S.E.M. 



Lrar "i S 






♦Ulrich, Carl Zimmer (s) 
Underwood, Clarence Lazear 

Af?r.. West Virginia Vu 
Valentine, Arthur Jay, Jr. (s) 
Valentine, Mark Twain (•) 
Van Camp, Oliver Cromwell (s) 
Vandegrift, Howard Watson (s) 
Van Gilder, Russell Dwight 
•Van Horn. William Burl (s) 
♦Van Valey, Gerald Wallace (s) 
♦Varner, Samuel Wilbur (s) 
Vassar, Blake Evans (s) 
♦Vaughan, Dennis Ralsten (s) 
Vickers, Alathea Kate 
Vickers, Fanny Clay 
♦Vincent, Harry Lee (s) 
♦Virgin, Courtney Clark (c) 

♦Wade, Charles Alexander (n) 
♦Wadsworth. Howard Jesse 
Wagner, Clifford Everett (c) 
♦Walker, Carl William (n) 
Walker, Clara Garten 
♦Walker, Lewis Jay, Jr. 
Walker, Reford Bond 
Walker, William Wallace (s) 
Walls, Hoy Jay (n) 
♦Walters, Roy Eugene 
Walters, William Walter 
Walton, John Marsh 
Ward, Carlos Dean (s) 
Warrick, Louis Frederick (c) 
Watkins. Cassie 
♦Watkins. Virgil Freeman (n) 
Watson, Alexander Robert (n) 
Watson, Clara Belle 
Watson, Dorothy Elizabeth 
♦Watson, Stephen Allen 
Wayt, David Francis (s) 
Weakley, Charles Edward Jr. (s) 
Wees, Donald Stuart (>) 
♦Wehrle, Paul Edmund 
Weimer, George Cecil 
♦Welch, Herman McClure 
Welch. Thomas George 
Wellen, Clyde William 

A.I'.., W-- | Urii 

Wellman Hugh Barge 
Wellman, Paul Revere (8) 

Wells, Ernest Blaine | 

S 
Wells. Ila Hall 
Wells. Mary Margaret 
Wells. Orva Arnold 
Wells. Verna Lillian 
Wernlnger, Mary Rebecca 



Wheeling 


B.8.C !•: 


St. Ifaryi 


Orad Agr. 


liveraity. 1 - 




Parsoni 


Soph . A B 


Parsoni 


Soph . A F 


Blaterarille 


Let v Med 


EUdgetoJ 


Fr.. B 9 1 B 


Morgantown 


Jun A B 


Loal Creek 


Fr.. A B 


St. Ma: 


Fr . A I". 


Sand Fork 


Fr. &8.C 1 


Shinnston 


Fi . BJB agr 


Willow Bend 


Fr.. A B 


llorgantown 


Fr .. A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr.. A B 


Watson 


Fr.. B.8.C H 


Wheeling 


Fr., B.S.M F 


Morgantown 


Fr.. B.S.M H 


Fairmont 


Fr., A.B. 


Williamstown 


Sen.. A.B. 


Martin. Fa. 


Fr.. B.S.C.E. 


Charleston 


Sen., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr.. A.B. 


Williamson 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Winona 


Soph.. A.B. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Wheeling 


Fr.. B.S.C.E. 


Clarksburg 


3rd Yr. Law 


Flm Grove 


Fr., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr.. B.S.C.E. 


Iforgantown 


Soph.. B.S.Ch E 


Flkins 


Fr.. A B 


Fairmont 


Fr.. A.B. 


Cokebur.:. Pa. 


Fr.. B.S.M F 


Morgantown 


Soph.. A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr.. A B. 


Jane LOW 


Fr.. B.S.C.E. 


West Libert y 


Fr.. B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Special A. & S. 


Flkins 


Soph.. All 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S ,AgT 


Fort Royal, Fa. 


Jun.. A B 


Albright 


■ Fr.. 1 3 


Albright 


Fr.. B.S 


llorgantown 


1st Yr. I. 






IfoundsTiUe 


Fr.. A B 


Moondsrille 


Fr.. A.B. 


•Morgantown 


Orad., a. & S. 






Morgantown 


ELH f 


Parkersbnrg 


Soph.. A.B. 


Morgantown 


Jun 


Morgantown 


Pharmi 


Hun • i 


Soph . A B 



?26 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



♦Wethered, John (s) 
Wetzel, Columbus Lon 
Wetzel, Lawrence Bartlett 
Wharton, Ray Hunter (c) 
Wheeler, Jerrold Ellsworth (c) 
Wheeler, Vernon Olan (n) 
Whetsell, Harry Edwin 
Whetsell, Mabelle Eleanor 
White, James Franklin 
White, Jerry Adams (s) 
White, Katharine Rosalie 
White, Mary Jane 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1918. 
White, Robert Patton Clarksburg 

White, Ross Bond Weston 

White, Stanley Ray Morgantown 

Whitehair, George Washington (s) Terra Alta 
Whitlatch, Hazel Lacy Farmington 

Whitlock, Mauzy Cleremont Rainelle 

Widmeyer, Robert Samuel Martinsburg 

Wiek, Rieda Adline Clarksburg 

Wiestling, Helen Merwin Wheeling 

AJB.,- West Virginia University, 1911 



Webster Springs 

Clarksburg 

Clarksburg 

New Martinsville 

Elkins 

Elkins 

Elkins 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Terra Alta 

Richwood 

Morgantown 



Wiggins, Eli Clifford (c) 
*Wiley, Bruce Otto 
*Williams, Dewey Lee 
♦Williams, George Edward 
Williams, Mary Elizabeth 
Wjlliams, Paul Henry (s) 
*Williams, Ray Arnett (s) 
Williams, Walter Rex (s) 
Williams, William James 
Williamson, Bernice Bertha 
♦Williamson, Raymond Ran- 
dolph (s) 
*Wills, Harry Houston (s) 
♦Wilson, Alice Eliza 
Wilson, Charles Vinyard 
Wilson, Orris Raymond (s) 
Wilson, Paul Russell 
Wilson, Robert Lusk 
fWilson, William Hart 
Wilt, Beatrice Maud 
Wilt, Katharyn 
♦Wince, Donald Edgar (n) 
Winer, Eva Amanda 
Winkler, Rudolph 
Winter, Alden Raymond (s) 
Winters, Ernest Emile, Jr. 
Wise, Bernice Claire 
♦Wiseman, Ruskin Johnson 
Witten, John Forest 



Wellsburg 

Keyser 

Hurst 

Macdonald 

Moundsville 

Ravenswood 

Wolf Summit 

Rosebud 

Morgantown 

Williamstown 

Friendly 

Ansted 

Parsons 

Lewisburg 

Kingwood 

Parsons 

Clarksburg 

Elkins 

Elkins 

Elkins 

Philippi 

New Martinsville 

Charleston 

Bridgeport 

Huntington 

Cameron . 

Summersville 

Charleston 



Ft., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Ft., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., B.S.M.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 



B.S.C.E. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S 



Jun. 
Fr., 
Fr., 
Fr., 
Fr., 
Fr., 
Fr., 



Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.M.E. 
Fr, A.B. 

Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.Agr. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.Agr. 
Sen., A.B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 



t Deceased. 



List of SruDSfrn 



327 



•Wolfe. Bruce Ellis 
•Wolfe. Robert Everett (s) 
Wolford. Grace Lo 
•Wooddell. Joseph Brook? 
•Wooddell, William Holt 
•Woodford. Clarence How* 
Woodyard, Henry Chapman 
Woofter, Andrew 
Worh y. Klizabeth Madoline 
•Wright, Martin Frank. Jr. 

t, Paul 

•Young. Christine Rob* 

Zaultzman. Abraham (•) 



Parkersburg 


Ft 


Ravens wood 


Ft B B M E 


-.intown 


Jun 15 S.H K. 


Pennsl 


Vr 




Ft.. 


-burg 








nswood 


Soph.. A 


Salem 


Soph . A a 


Burlir. . 




.ont 




ibarg 




.ont 


Ft., B.S 



128 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE SCHOOLS. 



Alderson, Cornelia Coleman 
Alderson, Luther Charles 
Alleman, Ruth Irene 
Anderson, Isabella 
Arnold, Arch Freeland 

Bailey, Ethel 
Baker, Charlotte Blair 
Baker, Mabel Clair 
Barnes, Gwendolyn Gilmore 
Baxter, Faith Ellen 
Belknap, Grover Cleveland 
Bell, James Grafton 
Bente, Alma Hannah 
Berkeley, Edmund Carter 
Bevington, Isabelle Alberta 
Bierer, Catherine Elizabeth 
Bloom, Mildred 
Boyles, Marian 
Brady, Mary Elma 
Brereton, Katherine Minnette 
Brigode, Augusta Martha 
Brown, Ada Elizabeth 
Brown, Virginia Wells 
Bruce, Lottie Bell 
Bruffey, Georgia Edna 
Buckley, Ula Mary 
Bunce, Almena Josephine 
Burnworth, Alma 

Canfield, Vergil 
Carden, Byena Hantense 
Carpenter, Meryl Mills 
Carter, Emily Brown 
Cash, Cleo Clendenin 
Cavendish, Mary Elizabeth 
Chambers, Nelle Amelia 
Chapman, Mayme Pitman 
Clark, Florence 
Cody, Mary Adeline 
Cokeley, Margaret May 
Cole, Mamie Maree 
Conley, Reva 
Conrad, Clara Woodell 
Corker, Alice Lee 
Cormany, Ingaba 
Coulson, May Angie 
Coulson, Stella Rose 
Courtney, Wilma Marie 
Cox, Bertha Virginia 
Crane, Lillian 
Crawford, John Thompson 
Creel, Mary Gertrude 
Cunningham. Georga Frances 



Alderson 


Summer 


School 


Summersville 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Parkersburg 


Summer 


School 


Terra Alta 


Summer 


School 


Weston 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




McClellandtown, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Marlinton 


Summer 


School 


Gassaway 


Summer 


School 


Gilboa 


Summer 


School 


Wheeling 


Summer 


School 


Winding Gulf 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Uniontown, Pa. 


Music 




Morgantown 






Adamston 


Summer 


School 


Collier 


Summer 


School 


Pekin, 111. 


Summer 


School 


Charleston 


Summer School 


Elizabeth 


Summer 


School 


Elizabeth 


Summer 


School 


New Martinsville 


Summer 


School 


Roanoke 


Summer 


School 


Jeannette, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Franklin, Pa. 


Music 




Piedmont 


Summer School 


Sutton 


Summer School 


Zela 


Summer School 


Uniontown, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Elm Grove 


Summer 


School 


Bluefield 


Music 




Sutton 


Music 




Bethany 


Music 




Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Ravenswood 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Harrisville 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 






Zona 


Summer 


School 


Webster Springs 


Summer 


School 


Hinton 


Summer School 


Belington 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




West Alexander, Pa. 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Kingwood 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Spencer 


Music 





List i >i Sti i 






Dalinsky, Anna Ida 
Daniell, Kdith 
Davis, Eleanor Josephine 
Davis, Inez 

Davis. Manila Carolyn 
Debrocq, August Lowie 
Debrocq, Qeorgett6 Germain 
DelTorchio, Kathryn Ida 
DelTorchlo, Mary 
Derrick, Mabel Alleen 
DeVose, Helen May 
Dille, Lucie BeUahoover 
Dill*-. Mary Ruth 
Dodrill. H. Moore 
Dorsey. Mary Merle 
Dotson, Susie Feiss 
Duller*, John Thomas 
Dunham, Orleyna Victor 

Eakle, Bonnie 
Edge. Esther Carta 
Kdminston. Eva 
Evans, Lulu 
Evans. Mary Elizabeth 
Fagert. Flossie Rebekah 
Faherty. Mary Josephine 
Fette, Mary Kin ma 
Fisher, Jessie Mabel 
Fling, Elsie Frances 
illng, Kay 
Fredericks. HeKn Mart 

Gandy, Hazel Merion 
Garletts. Florence Geneva 
Gidley. Rilla Lauretta 
Glenn. Kate Rachel 
Goff, Frankie Florence 
Goodall, Elizabeth Jane 
Green, Florence 
Green, Gertrude 
Gregg. Margarel Virginia 
Crimes. Maybelle Golden 
Grimes, Monna Gale 
Groves. Hattie Elizabeth 

Hall. Elizabeth lone 

Hall, Florence Malinda 

Hall. 

Hall, Margaret Elizabeth 

Hall. Nolle Herod 

Halliday. Gertrude Liter 

Hamilton. Nella Brooks 

Hamiick, Mayme 

Hamrick. Stella Gwendolyns 

Hamstead, Mary Ethel 



tntown 


Mni 




Paleetlne 


hool 


Morgantown 


Mi; 




Morgantown 


M D 




natwoodi 


Mil 




Point Marion. I';i 


Mi; 




Point Marion. I'a 


Mni 




Jeannette, i' • 


Bnmmer 


School 


Jeannette, Pi 


Sumiii'-r 




Wytherllle, \ 


Bnmmer 


School 


Chanute, Kan. 


Mi; 




gantown 


Mi; 




Morgantown 


Mnaic 




Klkhorn 


Bnmmer 


School 


Kinijwood 


Night CI 


Proctor 


Bnmmer 


School 


Point Marion. 1' i 


Mm 




Oakland. Ind. 


Sumno-r 


School 


Sutton 


Summer 


School 


Jeannette. Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Brownsville. Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Grafton 


Summer 


- 


Point Marion. Pa. 


Sunnm-r 


School 


Paden City 


Summer 


School 


Piedmont 


Sumno-r 


School 


Wheeling 


Mm 




Morgantown 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Mm 




Morgantown 


Music 




Wheeling 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 






Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Mni 




IVnnsboro 


Summer 


- 


Charleston 


Summer 


- 


Morgantown 


Mm 




Morgantown 


Mni 




Momantown 


Mm 




Huntersville 


Bnmmer 


School 


Huntersville 


mmer 


- 


Summersville 


Summer 


- 


Sutton 


Mm 




C.rafton 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


- 


Wheeling 


Summer 


- 


Morgantown 


Mi:- 




Morgantown 


Mm 




iwn 


Mm 




3] 


Snn 


- 


(Mark- 1 


Summer 


- 


Egton 




School 



°30 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



Harkins, Nelle Evelyn 
Harper, Carra Martha 
Harris, Manie Ethel 
Harth, Lorenia Josephine 
Hartigan, Marie Geraas 
Hartley, Elizabeth Kathryn 
Hartley, Eva Dale 
Hartley, Martha Wilhelmina 
Hays, Sally Holroyd 
Hazlett, Dora Alice 
Henry, Ella Elizabeth 
Henry, George Sisler 
Henry, Mabel Maxiene 
Herrmann, Ethel Adele 
Hess, William Taylor 
Hively, Viola Warren 
Hofrenter, Marie Caroline 
Hoge Mary Rhinehart 
Holbert, Nell Dale 
Hudkins, Mabel Jennet 
Huffman, Mary Gem 
Hupp, Canby Quay 

Ice, Ruby Janett 
Imlay, Annie Cecelia 

Jenkins, James 
Jenkins, Kathryn Virginia 
Jenkins, Nellie Kester 
Johnson, Ada Mae 
Johnson, Florence Randolph 
Johnson, Katherine Kennedy 
Johnston, Helen Norine 
Johnston, Jessie Lee 
Johnston, Marian Ruth 
Jones, Vivian 
Judy, Martha Pearl 

Keener, Louise 
Kerr, Marguerite 
Kessel, Ruby Staats 
Kiger, Hazel Ruth 
Kiger, Virginia Louise 
King, Mary Louise 
Krantz, Anna Irene 
Kyle, Irene 

Lanham, Ora McDermott 
Larew, Roberta Miller 
Laughery. Mary Helms 
Laulis, Mary Haley 
Lazelle, Mabel 
Lester, Verna Leodah 
Linch, Mary Charlotte 
Lockard, Mabel Monroe 



Morgantown 


Summer School 


Davis 


Night Class 


Fairmont 


Summer School 


Wheeling 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Cottageville 


Summer School 


Fairmont 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Athens 


Summer School 


Sherrard 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Elkins 


Summer School 


Freehold, N. J. 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


St. Albans 


Summer School 


Warwood 


Summer School 


Waynesburg, Pa. 


Night Class 


Jane Lew 


Summer School 


West Union 


Summer School 


Parkersburg 


Music 


Cameron 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


St. Marys 


Summer School 


Beckley 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Mount Nebo 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Franklin 


Music 


Charleston 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Chester 


Summer School 


Charleston 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 




Huntington 


Summer School 


Ripley 


Music 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Aurora 


Summer School 


Maiden 


Summer School 


Clarksburg 


Summer School 


Maiden 


Summer School 


Princeton 


Summer School 


Independence 


Summer School 


Moatsville 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Wheeling 


Summer School 


Point Marion, Pa. 


Music 



List OF Stud 



331 



Lockard, Mary Louise 


Point Marion 


Music 




Loriaux, Bertha 


Point Marion 


Music 




Lucas, Ina 


NVwburg 


Summer 


School 


Lydick, Shirley Margaret 


Wheeling 


Summer 


School 


Madeira. Dorcas 


Morgantown 


Mm 




Malcolm. Rachel Winslowe 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Maloney, Lillian Maud 


Mile 


Summer 


School 


Mapel. Margaret Lienor 


Point Marion 


Mm 




Mapel. Mary Victoria 


Dunkard, Pa. 


M B 




Martin. Alma 


Shinnston 


Mi: 




Marvin. Louis Harold 


M orient own 


M D - 




Mattingly, Emma Pauline 


Morgantown 


Mni 




Maust, Margaret Leone 


Morvantown 


M i; 




McBee. Edna Leona 


Morgantown 


Mu 




McCartney. Martha Ann 


Hinton 


Summer 


School 


McCleary. Grace 


Moundsville 


Summer 


School 


Mclntire, Walter 


Fairmont 


Summer 


School 


McKinney. Lillian Marguerite 


Morgantown 


M B 1 




lor, Rachel 


1 \ley 


Summer 


School 


anger, Metta 


Clarksburg 


Night 1 


Metheny, Emma Grace 


Buckhannon 


Summer 


School 


Meyers, Elizabeth 


Lonaconing. Md. 


Summer 


School 


Michaels. Mary Portman 


Morgantown 


Music 




Miller, Goldie Lee 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Miller. Lois Evalyn 


Morgantown 


Mni 




Miller. Sylvia Ellen 


St. Albans 


Mni 




Minder, Olga Marie 


Clendenin 


Summer 


School 


Minor. Galia Marie 


Carmiehaels. Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Monroe. Mabelle Jones 


Morgantown 


Mni 




Moore. Amy Katherine 


Ravenswood 


Mni 




Morgan, Nell 


Buckhannon 


Summer 


- 


Myers, Ivy Lee 


Summersville 


Summer School 


Nale, Helen Elizabeth 


Morgantown 


Mni 




Nugen, Everette 


Dem ; 


Summer 


School 


Orr. Jessie Bell 


Lonaconing. Md. 


Summer 


School 


Orr. Margaret Patrick 


Lonaconing. Mil 


Summer 


School 


Osborn. Irene May 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Ownby. Alexander Wiley 


Charleston 


Summer School 


Parker, Ruth Fairfax 


Mona 


Music 




Patterson. Mary Franc • 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Pell, Rebecca Lenore 


Independence 


Summer 


School 


Pennington, Gladys 


Morgantown 


Music 




Petersen. Sylvia Belle 


Pell si ow 


Summer 


School 


Pickenpaugh. Beulah Frank 


Morgantown 


Mm 




Pigott. Irene Edna 


Shinnston 


Music 




Plymale. Virginia Morgan 


Huntington 


;mer 


School 


Poling. Ri- 


tieer 


Mu 




Powell. Olive Livina 


Morgantown 






Prather. Lona May 


Juna 


Summer 


School 


Presseau. Georgia Catherine 


Elkins 


Summer 


School 


Price, Mabel Wilma 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 



332 



West Virginia University Catalogue 



Prickett, Mary Alcinda 
Prose, Lolas Eleanor 
Prose, Sherlea Mae 

Ramsey, Elizabeth 
Raybeck, Thelma 
Reddy, Ruth Hudson 
Reed, Virginia 
Rees, David Leyson 
Remlinger, Ada Marguerite 
Reps, Helen Doris 
Reyst, Klara Frederika 
Rider, Elinor Virginia 
Riggs, Emily Esther 
Riggs, Frances Mildred 
Rightmire, Ella Orr 
Robb, Helen Madeline 
Rogers, Louise Clemson 
Rose, Edythe Oella 
Rumsey, Virginia Clarinda 
Runner, Callie 
Russell, Helen Hack 
Ryan, Jessie 

Schmeichel, Emilie Louise Augusta 

Schroyer, Sara Elizabeth 

Shaffer, Anne Campbell 

Shakespeare, Anne Victoria 

Shanks, Fleda Anna 

Shaw, Alice Virginia 

Sheppard, Ocie Hardesty 

Show, Elven Irene 

Shriver, Ella Pearle 

Sidewell, Gladys Cornelia 

Simpson, Mildred 

Simpson, Olive Pearl 

Sirota, Alice 

Skiles, Thelma Artimissa 

Smith, Charles Joseph 

Smith, Homer Boyd 

Smith, Leola May 

Smith, Marguerite Elizabeth 

Snopps, Lucy Elizabeth 

Snyder, Dona Myrtle 

Spadaccio, Alma Marie 

Spangler, Ellenor Cleigh 

Stansberry, Gladine Steele 

Steele, Jane Bailey 

Stewart, Florence Edna 

Stiles, William Lawrence 

Stoker, Isabel Florence 

Stout, Pernae Eglantine 

Stump, Henry Charles 

Sturm, Mary Marjorie 

Swecker, Flora Jane 



Fairmont 


Night Class 


Huntington 


Summer 


School 


Huntington 


Summer 


School 


Mt. Lookout 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music. 




Summersville 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Grafton 


Music 




Parkersburg 


Music 




Leiden, Holland 


Summer School 


Halltown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Night Class 


Morgantown 


Night Class 


Parsons 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Smithfield, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Point Marion, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Point Marion, Pa. 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Cumberland, Md. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Arvilla 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Bulltown 


Summer 


School 


Clendenin 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Peterstown 


Summer 


School 


Little Falls 


Summer 


School 


Brownsville, Penna. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Ripley 


Summer 


School 


Yoe, Pa. 


Music 




Viropa 


Music 




Century 


Summer 


School 



[jEJT "i ST1 i 'i NTfi 



333 



Talbott, Virginia Compton 

Taylor. Elba olin 
Teetz. Mildred Harland 
Thomas. Edith May 

Thomas. Ifargaretta ( Hive 
Thompson, Lucj Irene 
Trembly, Ifarjorie Crane 

Tissue. Kathryn Anne 
Traceweil. Leooa 

Vandall. Floyd 
Vandervort. Jessie Carr 
VanHorn, Orpha Lenora 

Walker. Paul Kean 
Wallace. Ethel I... 
Weese. Ora 'de 
West. Lulu Hoffman 
Wejer, Ada Belle 
Whetsel. Bernice 
White, Ocie Florence 
Will. Aaron Jack 
Willard. Deeaa Nae 
Williams. Anna Lee 
Williams, Edgar 
Williams. Edith Eugenia 
Williams. Harriett 
Williams, Kathryn Foullse 
Williams, Mary Margaret 
Williams, Nannie Iyoraine 
Williams. Sara Elvira 
Willman, Kathryn Esther 
Wingfield. Mellie Rose 
Winston. John 
Wolfe. Oscar Floyd 
Wolfe. Rose Jean 
Wood. Phoebe Jane 
Wood, Ruth Augusta 
Woofter. Nina Bel 
Wycoff, Hilda Helen 



Philippi 

intown 
Aurora 

Wheeling 
Iforgantown 
Huntington 
Terra AJta 
Terra AJta 
P a rh erabnrg 

Creaton 

Fairmont 
P.landville 

Iforgantown 
Elm Grore 
Pennaboro 
Keyaer 
Parkeraburg 

Fayette City. Pa. 

Kingwood 
Iforgantown 

Adah. Pa, 

Iforgantown 
Iforgantown 
Iforgantown 
Iforgantown 

Shepherdstown 

Morgantown 

Shepherdstown 

Morgantown 

Clendenin 

Ten-Mile 

Rock Forge 

Kempton 

Iforgantown 

Dunbar, Pa. 
Morgantown 

Alum Bridge 

Fayette City. Pa 



Ifuaic 

Sumn 

Sunn:.' 

u 

Etammer Behool 

Music 

Bnmmer school 
Bummer Behool 

Bnmmer School 

I Class 
Bnmmer School 

Music 

Summer School 

Music 

Bnmmer Behool 

Summer School 
Summer School 
Summer School 
Music 

Summer School 
Music- 
Music 
Music 
Music- 
Summer School 
Music 

Summer School 
Music 

Summer School 
Summer School 
Music 

Summer School 
Music 

Summer School 
Night CI, 
Summer School 
Summer School 



Young. Zella May 
Zinn. Bertha Eoline 



Morgantown 
Philippi 



Music 

Summer School 






ADDRESS LIST OF FACULTY 
AND STAFF 



VOTFB: lowing- the ti»tne indicates the year of appointn*«U to ttoe 

presrot position. \VIh*iv a MBOOd 'lat^ is given it tad lea tea the year of first aj> 
pofntroent on the University staff. 

Alderman, William, Horace, B.S.Apr.; Professor of Horticulture and 
Horticulturist. Experiment Station; 1911; Acting Dean Ol 
of Agriculture and Acting Director of the Experiment St 
January to June. 1919; 14 Simpson Street; 444J. 

Alger, Kathryn. A.B., B.S.A-' A — istant in Home Economic- 
sion); 1918. 1917; 110 H t; 1204. 

Ambler. Charles Henry. Ph.D.: I of History .»n) ; 

1917; Y. M. C. A., Parkersburg. W. Ya. 

Anderson. Hugh; Instructor in Mining (Extension); 1918 
\Y. Ya. 

Andrews, Edgar Lewis. B.S.Agr.; Associate Professor of Poultry B 
bandry and Assistant Poultryman. Experiment Station; 1917; 1913; 
East Willey Street; 880M. 

Ankrom, Leslie. B.S.Agr.; Instructor in Horticulture and A 
Horticulturist; Experiment Station. 1917; 16 Clark Stn • 

Arkin. Aaron, Ph.D.. M.D.; Professor of Pathology and Medical Bac- 
teriology; 1913; 170 McLane Avenue; 484. 

Armstrong, Robert Allen; AM. L.H.D. ; Professor of English Lan- 
guage and Literature; lfOS, 18t8; 733 I'niv.-rsity Terrace; 698R. 

Arnett. Lonna Dennis; Ph.D.; Librarian; 1910; 170 M< Lane Avenue; 
484. 

Atkeson. Marv Meek. A.M.; Instructor in English; 1910. 1915: 
Willey Street; 963M. 

Atkeson. Thomas Clark. Ph.D.; Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
Emeritus; 1914. 1891: Washington, D. C. 

Atwood. Horace. M S A-r. ; Poultryman, Experiment Station; 1916: 
1897; 410 Charles Ave.; 455J. 

Barbe, Waitman. A.M.; Litt.D.; Director of the Summer School and 

Professor of English; 1910. 1895; Peabody Hotel. 
Berg. Anthony. B - -ant Plant Pathologist Expert :^n; 

1913; 36 University Driveway; 667M. 
Bergy. Gordon Alger, Ph.C. M.S.: Assistant Professor of Pharm. 

1916: 4S7 High Street. 
Bishop, Charles Edward. Ph.D.: Prof SHOT of Oreeh LangttSgC and 

Literature; 1911; 148 McLane Ave.; 563W. 
Black. Louis: Director of the School of v 

495. 
Blair. Thomas Jackson. B B I "1 1 j Instructor in Sun 

Willey Street; 1196M. 
Boughner. Jennie DeLawtier, A.B : A--.-t.int Librarian; It 16; 392 

Willey Street; 9MJ 



H36 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Brake. Arthur Kent, B.S.E.E.; Instructor in Surveying; 1918; Resigned 
December 7, 1918. 

Bristol, Lucius Moody, Ph.D.; Associate Professor of Sociology; 1917, 
1915; 6 Brockway Ave.; 127J. On leave of absence with the Amer- 
ican Red Cross during first semester, 1918-19. 

Brooks, Chandler Linn; Superintendent of Building and Grounds- 
1917; 394 Willey Street; 337R. 

Brown, Samuel Boardman, A.M.; Professor of Geology and Miner- 
alogy; 1892, 1890; 640 High Street; 796 J. 

Butterfield, Frederic Curtis, A.B.; Head of Piano Department; 1913; 
324 Willey Street; 963M. On leave of absence with Y. M. C. A. 
in France. . 

Callahan, James Morton, Ph.D.; Professor of History and Political 

Science and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences; 1916; 1902; 

136 Willey Street; 586J. 
Callen, Alfred Copeland; E.M., M.S.; Associate Professor of Mining 

Engineering; 1917; 45 Jones Ave.; 754W. 
Cannaday, Charles Benton, A.M.; Professor of Latin; 1916 1914- 

12 Hagan's Ave.; 1167M. 
Carlin, Leo, A.B., LL.B.; Assistant Professor of Law; 1916; 27 Wilson 

Ave.; 958R. On leave of absence during first semester with War 

Trade Board. 
Gavins, Lorimer Victor, A.M.; Professor of Education; 1918. 
Cheydleur, Frederic Daniel, Ph.D.: Assistant Professor of Romance 

Languages; 1918; 174 High Street; 234R. 
Chitwood, Oliver Perry, Ph.D.; Professor of European History; 1907; 

312 Park Street; 683W. 
Clark, Friend Ebenezer, Ph.D.; Professor of Chemistry; 1914; 649 

Spruce Street; 830R. 
Cody, Stuart Alverton; Assistant Poultry Club Agent, Agricultural 

Extension Staff; 1916; 156 Willey Street; 120W. 
Colborne, Blanch E., Matron of the Women's Hall: 1913; 247 Willey 

Street, 258. 
Colwell, Rachel Hartshorn, B.S., M.A.; Associate Professor of Home 

Economics; 1910; 628 Spruce Street; 71 J. 
Colwell, Robert Cameron, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor of Physics; 1918; 

66 Beverly Avenue. 
Conaway, Mary Louise, A.B.; Secretary to the Dean of the College of 

Engineering; 1918; 698 High Street; 731M. 
Cook, Isaac Scott, Jr., B.S.Agr.; Consulting Agronomist, Experiment 

Station; 1916, 1910. 
Coulter, John Lee, Ph.D.; Dean of the College of Agriculture and Di- 
rector of the Experiment Station; 1915; 94 Beverly Ave.; 450R. 

On leave of absence during second semester with Army Overseas 

Educational Commission in France. 
Cox, John Harrington, A.M.; Professor of English Philology; 1904, 

1902; 34 University Driveway; 563 J. 
Crane, Dee; Potato Specialist, Agricultural Extension Staff; 1917; 

North Front Street; 804 J. 
Crane, Harley Lucius, B.S.Agr.; Instructor in Horticulture and Assist- 
ant Horticulturist, Experiment Station; 1914; 757 N. Front Street; 

134R. 



Adoh 9B L . \iti.tv and Staff 

Dadisman, Andrew Jackson, MS Apr.; AlHTHiltl -or of Rural 

Economics and Farm Management ar. .nt in Farm Man 

ageinent. Experiment Station; 1916; llfl Will. > 3 

Darby. Arleigh Id •■. A M : Profeeeor o: 

guages; 1915. 1910; 487 High Street. On leave of absence with 
V M C. A in Italy. 

Davis. Roland Parker. M.C.E.. Ph. I ructural and Hy- 

draulic Engineering; 1912. 1911; 16 Demain A\- 

Deahl. Jasp» r Newton. Ph.D.; Professor of Education lfOl; 414 Park 
Street; 660R. 

Dodd. Samuel Lowell; Instructor in Plant Pathology (Extension); 
191S; 415 Park Street. R> ! arch 1, 1911' 

Dodds. Gideon Stanhope. PhD .nt Professor of 1! and 

Embryology; 1918; 519 Front Street; 267. 

Donn Instructor in Violin; 1918; 45 Jones Avenue; 754W. 

Dustman. Robert Barclay. B.S.Agr.; Instructor in Asrronomy. Agricul- 
tural Extension Staff; 1916; 150 McLane Avenue; 368J. 
April 1. 1919. 

Eiesland, John Arndt. Ph.D.; Professor of Mathematics; 1907; 23 

Demain Ave. 
Elliott. Lucile Ware; Assistant in Public School Mus. 419 

Spruce Street. 
Emory. Frederick Lincoln B.S.- M.M.E.: Professor of Mechanics and 

Applied Mathematics: 1897. I8tl; 156 Foundry Street; 342J. 
Ezell, Belton Bonner. B.S..\:r: A militant State Agent. Agricultural 

Extension Staff; 1914; 297 Grant Ave. 

Fairbank. Harry Horton, V.S.; Veterinarian. Agricultural Extension 

Staff; 1918; 68 Beverly Avenue; 1083J. 
Fisher. Claire; Student Assistant in Mathematics; 1918; 480 Spruce 

Street; 124. 
Fisher. Robert Waldorf. M.D. ; Instructor in Physical Diagnosis; 1913; 

Price Building; 112" 
Fling. Eva M . A.B.; Student Assistant in Botany; 1917; 52 Stewart 

Street; 28. 
Forman. Alexander Hardie. E.E.. M.M.E . Ph.D.; Professor of D 

trical Engineering; 1916. 1913; 6 Demain Ave.; 955J. 
Fox. Mary Adelaid- nt Librarian; 1917; 1 Vance Lone 

Frame. Nat Terry. A.B.; State Agent in charge of County 

Work. Agricultural Extension Staff; 1914; appointed Director of 
^cultural Extension. April 1. 1919; 628 North Hich St.. 731J. 
Friend. Lloyd Lownd* > A If.; Professor of Secondary Education; 

1910. 1897; Charleston, W. Va. 

Garrison. Lillian Knight; Assistant in Voice and Public School Music; 

1917; 30") University Driveway; 847J Resigned. February 1. 1919. 
Giddincs. Nahum James. M.S.; Plant Pathologist. Experiment Station; 

1908; 36 University Driveway; 667M. 
Gill. Gladys Grimshaw. B.S.; Instructor in Home Econom 

Spruce Street; 71 J. 
Gnagey. William Oliver: Mechanician. College of Engineering; 1918; 

In Demain Ave. 
Gray. Harry Edward; Instructor in Mining (Extension); 191V; Elkins. 

W. Va 



338 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Griffin, Morna B.; Secretary to the President, 457 High Street. 

Grow, George Walter, B.S.M.E., M.S.; Assistant Professor of Machine 

Design and Construction; 1914, 1912; 211 Wells Street. 
Grumbein, John Behny, M.M.E.; Professor of Steam and Experimental 

Engineering; 1916, 1903; McLane Avenue; 881J. 
Guseman, Sadie Rae, B.S.; Assistant in Home Economics in charge of 

Girls' Club Work, Agricultural Extension Staff; 1913; 42 Stewart 

Street. 

Hall, Arthur Adams, B.S.M.E.; Associate Professor of Electrical En- 
gineering; 1916; 379 Front Street; 1032J. 
Hardman, Thomas Porter, M.A., LL.B.; Jur.Dr.; Associate Professor 

of Law; 1915, 1913; 136 High Street; 431R. On leave of absence 

during first semester. 
Hardy, Irvin, M.D.; Instructor in Minor Surgery; 1912; Cobun Ave.; 

629J. 
Hare. Alfred Jarrett, A.M.; Professor of Latin, and Secretary and 

Registrar of the University; 1898, 1889; 411 High Street; 1195 J. 
Hart, Simeon Thompson. B.S.M.E.; Assistant Professor of Machine 

Construction and Superintendent of Shops; 1915; 234 Jackson A~Ve. 
Hartley, Charles Henry, B.S.; Assistant Director of Agricultural Ex- 
tension; 1914; 5 Collins Ferry Road; 247 J. 
Hayes, Flora Ray, A.B.; Instructor in Theory and History of Music; 

1910; 480 High Street; 967 J. 
Hayes, Leslie David, B.S., M.E.; Professor of Machine Design and 

Construction; 1918; 414 Willey Street; 984R. 
Hedrick, Charles E., A.M.; Instructor in History; transferred from the 

faculty of the Glenville State Normal School for the first semester, 

1918-19. 
Henderson, Harry Oral, M.S.; Instructor in Dairying (Extension) 

1918; 60 Jones Avenue. 
Henry, Otto Hazelton; Student Assistant in Steam and Experimental 

Engineering; 1918; 170 Pleasant Street. 
Hepworth, Marion Martha, B.S.; Associate Professor of Home Eco- 
nomics, Agricultural Extension Staff; 1916; 580 Spruce Street; 

349W. 
Higby, Chester Penn, Ph.D.; Instructor in History; 1916; 334 Park 

Street; 1047 J. 
Hill, Hubert, M.S.; Assistant Professor of Chemistry; 1916, 1910; 186 

First Street; 474R. 
Hite, Bert Holmes, M.S.; Chief Chemist, Experiment Station, and 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry; 1895; 222 Pleasant Street; 

1028. 
Hill, Lawrence Benjamin, A.M.; Associate Professor of Education; 

1918; 182 First Street; 235J. 
Hoard, Elma, B.S.; Assistant in Bacteriology and Pathology; 1918; 

456 High Street; 437R. Resigned February 1, 1919. 
Hobensack, Clarice, B.S.Ed.; Assistant in Mathematics: 1918; 205 

Willey Street; 967R. 
Hodgson, Joseph Ellis, Ph.D.; Professor of Mathematics; 1913, 1912; 

209 Grant Ave.; 254R. 
Hogue, Robert Reid, Cheese Specialist; Agricultural Extension Staff; 

1918; 297 Grant Ave.; 715W. 
Hunt, Harrison Randall, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor in Zoology; 1916; 

162 First Street. 



Arouse LOT Of KUTI.TY AM) STAFF 

Johnson, David Dale, A.M.; Associate Professor of Bnglllh; 1914, 

1902; 105 Fayette Street; 979 J. 
Johnston. John Charles; Secretary to the Dean of the CoUegi 

riculture; 1914; LSI McLam- A.- ; 995R. 

Jolliffe. Charles Byron. B.Sc; Instructor in Phvsics; 1919, If 17 J 219 

Cedar street; H6::\v. 
Jones. Clement Roes, m.k. m m i: j Dean <>f the <'<>: 

Ing ami Profeeeor of Powei l i: Willey 

Street; I06J. 
Jones. Henry. Ph.D.; A : of Horticulture and \ 

Horticulturist of the Experiment Station; 1919; 724 North Fron- 

Street. 
Jones, Henry Craig, AH.. LLP . : ProfesaOff of Law and De;m of the 

College of Law; 101 1; 204 Gnu 

during first semester, 1918-19 in American Red I 

Kendriek. William Henry. All.; State Boys' Club Agent, Agricultural 

Extension Staff; 1913; 144 I'l Street; 334 J. 

Kinc. Benjamin Walter. A.M.; Assistant Professor of Econom 

390 North Willey Street. 427R. On leave of absence since February 

1. 1918. in Fnited States Berrii 
Knight, Lee Irving. Ph.D.: Plant Physiologist, Experiment Station; 

1913: 205 Gordon Street; 418R. Resigned, January 1. 1919. 
Krak. Jan Hendrick Berghuis. B.C.: assistant Chemist, Experiment 

Station; 1908; 258 McLane Avenue; 881 M. 
Kunst, Frank Batson. A.B.; Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station; 

1901; Garlow Building. 1028. 

Legge, Withrow Reynolds, M.S.; Instructor in Horticulture. Agricul- 
tural Extension Staff; 1916; 457 High Street. On leave of absence 
in United States Military Service. 

Leland. Benjamin Town*-. A.M.; or of Industrial 

Education; 1918. 

Lewis. Laura F.. A.B.; Instructor in English; Transferred from the 
faculty of the Fairmont State Normal School for the first sem» 

Limprecht, Elwood George. B.S.M.E.; Instructor in Drawing and ' 
chine Design; 1918; 97 Kingwood Street. 

Lueder, Charles Augustus, D.V.M.: Associate Professor of Veterinary 
Science; 1912. 1908; 751 N. Front Street; SOUL 

Mcllvane. Theodore Clinton. U.S. Alt.. M.S.; Assistant Agronomist. 

Experiment Station; In charge Of Tobacco Investigations; Hun' 

ington. W. Va. 
Mestrezat. Walter Alexander; Chief Musician I and In- 

structor in Band Music; 1901; .",7 Bridgi 3 1167J 

Moore. Susan Maxwell. A.B.; Dean of Womefl and Instructor in Piano; 

1903; 247 Willey Street; 258. 
Morris. Russell Love. B.S.C.E.; Professor of Railway and H 

Engineering; 1805; 294 Grand sir. 
Morris, Samuel, M.A.: Assistant P of Chemistry; 1917; 1916; 

17 Demain Arenae; S8SW. 
Morris. Samuel John. Ml .'omy; 1 

1912; 83 Kingwood Street: I0€J 
Morse. Withrow. Ph.D tie Projessjor of Physiolocy and Phjl 

logical Chemistry; 1 9 1 S ; ColllUfl Ferry Road; 551 



240 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Muirnna, Harlan Leslie; Major, United States Army; Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics and Commandant of Cadets; 1919; 
644 Spruce Street. 

Nebel, Merle Louis, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor of Geology; 1918- Died 

October 12, 1918. 
Neil, Charles Edmund, A.M.; Professor of Public Speaking; 1903; 239 

Spruce Street; 641R. On leave of absence during first semester, 

1918-19. 

Patch, Roland Harrison, M.S.; Instructor in Horticulture and Assistant 
Horticulturist, Experiment Station; 1917; 186 First Street; 378.T. 
On leave of absence in United States Military Service in France. 

Peairs, Leonard Marion, B.S.Agr., M.S.; Professor of Entomology and 
Research Entomologist, Experiment Station; 1913, 1912; 50 Jones 
Ave.; 895R. 

Pollock, Rebecca Luella, A.M.; Instructor in English; 1916; 239 Pros- 
pect Street; 184 J. 

Price, William Armstrong, Jr., Ph.D.; Assistant Professor of Geology; 
1914, 1913; 324 Willey Street; 968M. On leave of absence during 
first semester, 1918-19, in United States Military Service. 

Provost, Antonio Joseph, B.L.; Instructor in Romance Languages; 1918; 
174 High Street; 234R. 

Purinton, Daniel Boardman, Ph.D., LL.D.; President and Professor of 
Philosophy, Emeritus; 1911, 1873; 89 Grandview Ave., 973R. 

Randolph, John Hager; First Lieutenant, United States Army; Assist- 
ant Professor of Military Science and Tactics and Assistant Com- 
mandant of Cadets; 1919. 

Reese, Albert Moore, Ph.D.; Professor of Zoology; 1907; Wagner Road. 

Reilly, Nina Catherine, B.S.; Instructor in Home Economics; 1917; 
239 Prospect Street; 184 J. 

Rey, Ernest, A.B.; Instructor in French; 1918; 446 Front Street. 

Reynolds, Vivian Jordan; Student Assistant in Library; 1917; 511 High 
Street; 184W. 

Richards, Margaret Dickey; Student Assistant in Botany; 1917; 382 
Willey Street. 

Richey, Harry Wyatt, B.Sc.Agr.; Assistant Professor of Horticulture 
and Assistant Horticulturist, Experiment Station; 1917; 246 Fife 
Avenue; 203W. 

Rogers, Harold Frantz, A.M.; Instructor in Chemistry; 274 Wiles St.; 
transferred for the year from the faculty of the Fairmont State 
Normal School. 

Rouzer, Paul Charles, B.S.Agr.; Instructor in Agricultural Education; 
1917; 120 Beverly Avenue. 

Rumsey, William Earl, B.S.Agr.; State Entomologist, Experiment Sta- 
tion; 1893; 415 Park Street; 671R. 

Russell, Katherine, Secretary to the Dean of the College of Law; 
1917; 281 Grant Avenue. 

Salter, Robert Mundhenk, M.S.; Assistant Professor of Soils and Soils 
Chemist, Experiment Station; 1916, 1915; 741 North Front Street. 

Sarle, Charles Faye, B.S.; Assistant in Farm Management; 1916; 456 
Front Street; 1024W. On leave of absence during first semester, 
1918-19, in United States Military Service. 



Address Lisi oi Pacul/ti \m> Staff :n 

Schmidt. Clara Rowena, B.S.Bd.; instructor in Boom BWnwV 

591 Spruce Btreet; I49W. 
Schultz. Valerie EUiabeUl, AH.; Instructor in Horn*- Economies; 1918; 

686 Grand 8treet; 4si\v. 

Seaman, Raynier Egbert; Instructor in Woodworking and Foundry 

Practice; 1912; ^^ Washington >u 

Shaw. Edward Lee, B.Bc.Agr.; instructor In Animal Husbandry. 4 
cultural Experiment station Staff; rjiT: Ifonongaheli 

879J. 
Sheets. Karl Wooddell. B.S.Aur.. MS; ProfM \nirnal bUSl 

1913, 1912. On leave of absence with the Unit 

meni of Agriculture, 

Sheldon. John Lewis. Ph.D.; Professor of Botany; 1913. 1903: 

Grand Street; 594 J. 
Simonton. James Wiggins, A.B.. J.I). ; Professor of Law; PUT. 1914; 

6 South Walnut Street: 1090M. On leave of absence during first 

semester, 1918-19, with the War Trade Board. 
Simpson, John Nathan, M.P. ; Dean of the School of Medicine and 

Professor of Physiology; 1912, 1902; 14 Will, y Driveway; I44J 
Smith. Iona; Assistant Librarian; 115 Beverly Avenue; 803R. 
Smith. Simeon Conant. A.M.; Associate Professor of Rhetoric; 1914, 

1899; 174 High Street; on leave of absence since December 1, 1917 
Snee. Grace Martin; Instructor in Piano and Pipe Organ; 1903. 1898; 

282 Fayette Street; 1147M. 
Spangler. Robert Clifton, A.M.; Instructor in Botany; 1914; 1912; 

250 First Street. 
Stansbury. Harry Adams. B.S.; Director of Athletics; 1917; 12 Willey 

Driveway; 59. 
Starkey, Lawrence Vincent. B.S.Agr., M.S.; Instructor in Animal Hus- 
bandry, Agricultural Ext. Staff; 1917; 221 Willey Street; 

975J. 
Stathers. Madison. Ph.D.; Professor of Romance I i; 1910. 

1906; 288 Grand Street; 594 W. 
Stemple. Forrest Wilbur, A.B.. M.S.; Professor of Agronomy; 1917. 

1916; 727 North Front Street; 692R. 
Stewart. James Scott. M.S.; Professor of Mathematics Emeritus; 

1907. ls77: 116 Willey Street; 120R. 
Stillman, Albert, L.. M.S.; Captain. United States Army; Professor of 

Military Science and Tactics during first semester, 1918 19. 
StOCkdale, Charles Ellsworth. B.S.A .cultural Editor; 1916; R 

D., Morgantown. 
Strickland. Francis Lorette. Ph.D.; Professor of Philosophy; 1915; 

615 Grand Street. 
Sutton, Luther Francis. R-flAgr ; Assistant Horticult 01 peri- 

ment Station, and Superintendent of Reymann Memorial E -. 

ment Farm; 1917. 1912; Wardensville. \Y Va. 

Titlow. Calvin EL, Director of Agricultural Extension; 1911; 

erly Ave.. 555J. Resigned, April 1. 1919. 
Trotter. Frank Butler, ll.d. ; President; 1916. II 

151J. 
Trotter, J 

. M8J On • i re ol - 19, kn 

Food 



342 West Virginia University Catalogue 

Truscott, Frederick Wilson, Ph.D.; Professor of Germanic Languages 
and Literature; 1899, 1897. On leave of absence in United States 
Military Service. 

Tuckwiller, Ross Homan, B.S.Agr.; Assistant in Beef Cattle Investiga- 
tions, Experiment Station; 1916; Lewisburg, W. Va. 

Vandervort, Hu Swisher, B.S.Agr.; Assistant State Agent, Agricultural 
Extension Staff; 1915, 1912; 51 Maple Ave.; 1163 J. 

Vickers, Enoch Howard, A.M.; Professor of Economics and Sociology; 
1910; 748 University Terrace; 692 J. 

Virgin, Robert Zerrubabel, Instructor in Mining (Extension), Wheel- 
ing, W. Va. 

Waggoner, Chauncey William, Ph.D.; Professor of Physics; 1909; 730 
University Terrace; 968M. 

Weakley, Charles Edward, Jr.; Assistant Chemist, Experiment Sta- 
tion; 1907; Peabody Hotel. On leave of absence during first 
semester, 1918-19, in United States Military Service. 

West, Rufus Asa; Instructor in Metal Working and Stationary En- 
gineering; 1913, 1892; 181 First Street; 132 J. 

Whitehill, Alexander Reid, Ph.D.; Professor of Chemistry; 1885; 
Prairie Ave. and Wagner Road; 699. 

Whiting, Hunter, A.B.; Instructor in French; transferred for the first 
semester from the faculty of the Glenville State Normal School. 

Wiestling, Helen, A.B.; Assistant in Pharmacology and Physiology; 
1918; 480 Spruce Street; 494. 

Willey, William Patrick, A.M.; Professor of Equity, Jurisprudence and 
Commercial Law, Emeritus; 1912, 1883; 250 Pleasants Street; 
150M. 

Williams, Edgar, A.M.; Instructor in English; 1918; 56 Ash Street; 
263M. 

Willis, Dennis Martin, A.B.; LL.M.; Financial Secretary; 1915, 1895; 
212 Park Street; 1078 J. 

Winkler, Charles Herman, Ph.D.; Assistant Professor of Agricultural 
Education; 1916; 10 Clark Street; 864R. 

Wylie, Robert Morris, A.M.; Instructor in Physics; transferred for the 
first semester from the faculty of the Marshall College State Nor- 
mal School. 

Yoke, John Jonathan, B.S.Agr.; Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry, and Assistant in Animal Husbandry, Experiment Station; 
1915; 580 Spruce Street; 349 J. 

Zern, Edward Nathan, B. S.; Lecturer on Mining Engineering; 1917; 
1912; Pittsburg, Pa. 



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INDEX 



Absences, 36, 37 

Accredited preparatory schools, 53 
Address list of faculty and staff, 335 
Admission, to the University, 31, 57 
Admission, Requirements for 

College of Agriculture, 191 

College of Arts and Sciences, 68 

College of Engineering, 137 

College of Law, 233 

Degree course in Home Economics, 218 

School of Medicine, 253 

School of Music, 273 

Summer School, 286 
Advanced standing, 32, 137, 193, 220, 2:55 
Agricultural education, 72, 196, 202. 
Agriculture : 

College of, 183 

Experiment station, 15, 187 

Extension division, 16, 227 

Entrance credit in, 64, 191 

Farmers' Week in, 229 

Courses in, 201 

Summer courses in, 193 
Agronomy, 72, 196, 203 
Aid for students, 49 
American history, 103 
Anatomy, 250, 259 
Animal Husbandry, 72, 197, 206 
Armory, 292 
Assistant professors, 12 
Assistants, 14 
Associate professors, 11 
Astronomy, 111 

Arts and Sciences, College of, 65 
Athletic board of control, 8 
Athletics, 26 
Athletic eligibility, 27 

Bachelor's degrees, 39, 69, 139, 193, 219, 233 
Bacteriology, 250, 261 
Band music, 278 
Bar examinations, 236 
Boarding and rooming places, 49, 286 
Botany, 25, 73, 268 
Bryan pri?e, 50 

Buildings, 22, 132, 189, 232, 271 
Cadet appointments, 293 
Cadet band, 292 
Cadet corps, 289 
Calendar, 4, 5 
Certificates for teachers, 52 



Chemical engineering, 150 

Chemistry, 24, 75, 262, 267 

Choral Society, 272 

Chorus singing, 272 

Christian associations, 43 

Civil engineering 140 

Classification of students, 34, 71, 138, 193, 

220 
Class officer, 34, 196, 219 
Coal mining, 146 
Combined courses in two colleges, 70, 152, 

200, 234 
Committees : 

of Arts and Sciences faculty, 67 

of University faculty, 8 

of Agricultural faculty, 186 

of Engineering faculty, 131 
Composition and rhetoric, 88 
Concerts and recitals, 272 
Conditional admission, 32 
Conditions, 37 
Control, Board of, 6 
Convocation, 43 
Council of Administration, 7 
Courses of Instruction : 

College of Arts and Sciences, ', 2 

College of Agriculture, 201 

College of Engineering, 158 

College of Law, 243 

In home economics, 222 

School of Music, 276 

School of Medicine, 255 
Credits, 34 
Crops, 205 
Curricula : 

In agriculture, 195 

In engineering, 139-155 

In home economics, 221 

In medicine, 255 

In pharmacy, 256 
Dairy husbandry, 197, 209 
Dean of Women, 48 
Degrees : 

General regulations concerning, 39 

In the College of Arts and Sciences, 69 

In the College of Agriculture, 193 

In the College of Engineering, 139 

In the College of Law, 238 

In home economics, 219 

Conferred in 1918, 297 









Diplomas in mus: 

Ooatarod In 

fcw wk i i- . - 

Elective courses. 7 

rieal engineering. 11" 

;ate work in. 1"7 

Supplementary summer term ir 
Engineering BodOtJ, i:>6. 

-- M 
English language and liter; - 
English h- ~ 
English. Teaching of 
Enrollment, surani i - 
Ensemble. HI 
Entomol(.R. 
Entrance credits 
Entrance requirements. - 
Equipment : 

Of laborat. - 

In • I -riculture. 189. 

In the College of Engineering. 

In home JIT 

In the School of Music. 271 

In the C.>llege of Luu . . 
|§] 
Examinati | 

Experiment Station. Agricultural, 1". 187 
rimental engineering. 17" 

irses: 
In agriculture 
In mining. It! 
Facui- 

Alphabetical list of. 

1 - -f Arts tad B 
College of Engir 
p Of Law 

271 
Summer School 
I'nlversi: 

I 

nianageme: 211 

Farm operations 

- 
Farm. I'niversitv. 189 
Farmers' week In agriculture 



Food.* 

Foundation of I'niverslty. 20 

Fraternities and Boroi 

- 

Fund* 

General information 
Geology and mir 
Cenn.i 

:ient Of the I'nivers' 
Grading. System ' 

ind degret- 
Greek 

High school certificate 
High schools. I- U 

IM 

Home economics. 217 
- 212 
lllc engineering 
Hygiene and sanitation. 11> 
Industrial education. 
Instruction. Staff of. 9 
Instructors. 13 
Inter-fraternity scholastic tr 
Italian. 12". 
Journalism. Agricultural. Ml 

Latin 

Law. Coital 
Law. Courses In 
Law Utami 

Quarterly. 
Libra r. . 

Library staff. 17 
Location of the I'nivers • 

>ign and conotrv 
Major subje<- 
Manual training 

112 
-natlcs. A[ ; 
. ation. :;i 
Maximum and minlmur- 
Mies. Special 

and m.i 

SlgT 

Mechanical engineering. H2 

Mechanics and applied mathematics. 111. 

169 
Medical library and reading - 
Medical v - 
Medical building 
Medicine. Course in. I 



34:6 



Medicine, School of, 247 

Microscopy, 269 

Mid-semester reports, 37 

Military Science and Tactics, Division 

of, 289 
Military Science : 

Courses of instruction in, 293 

Required training in, 26, 290 

Special rewards for excellence in, 292 

State law regarding, 290 
Mineralogy, 95 
Mining engineering, 146, 171 
Morris prize in engineering, 50 
Music : 

Tuition in, 280 

Courses in, 273 

In summer school, 279 

Instructors in, 271 

School of, 271 

Requirements for graduation in, 274 

Theory of, 278 

History of, 279 
Officers of the University, 7 
Oil and gas engineering, 148 
Olericulture, 198, 213 
Oratory, 119 

Orchestra, University Philharmonic, 272 
Organizations and societies, 44 
Paleontology, 25 
Pathology, 250, 261 
Pharmacy : 

Curriculum in, 257 

Courses in, 266 

Instruction in, 248 

Laboratories of, 251 

Special students in, 254 
Pharmacognosy and materia medica, 269 
Pharmacology, 251, 263 
Phi Beta Kappa Society, 44 
Philosophy, 113 
Physical diagnosis, 265 
Physics, 23, 115 
Physiological chemistry, 250, 265 
Physiology, 118, 250, 264 
Plant pathology, 214 
Piano, 274, 276 
Pipe organ, 277 
Political science, 105 
Pomology, 198, 212 
Poultry husbandry, 199, 215 
Practical observation, Facilities for, 136 
Practice and procedure in law, Courses 
in, 241 



Preparatory schools, 53 

Prizes, 50, 300 

Professional degrees in Engineering, 157 

Professors, 9 

Psychology, 113 

Public school music, 275, 278 

Public speaking, 119 

Publications, Student, 46 

Railway and highway engineering, 173 

Regents, The Board of, 6 

Registration, 33, 35 

Reports of grades, 37 

Reserve Officers Training Corps, 26 

Reymann Memorial Farm, 190 

Rhetoric, 88 

Road engineering, 174, 182 

Roads, School of, 182 

Romance languages and literature, 122 

Rural engineering, 205 

Sanitary engineering, 179 

Schedule of courses : 

B.S.Agr. Course, 195 

B.S.C.E. Course, 141 

B.S.M.E. Course, 143 

B.S.E.E. Course, 145 

B.S.E.M. Course, 147, 149 

B.S.Chem.E. Course, 151 

B.S.H.E. Course, 221 

Medicine, 255 

Ph.G. Course, 257 
School of Good Roads, 182 
School of Mines, 182 
School of Music, 271 
Science, 62 
Semester hour, 34 
Social life of students, Regulations 

concerning, 46 
Societies, 44 
Sociology, 81 
Soils, 204 
Spanish, 125 

Special students, 32, 138, 194, 220, 234 
Staff of instruction, 9 
Standing committees, 8 
Steam and gas engineering, 175 
Structural engineering, 178 
Student assistants, 14 
Student government association, 

Women's, 48 
Student publications, 46 
Students Army Training Corps, 26 
Students, List of, 301 
Substitution for required courses, 35 



Indi.x 






Summer Coir 

in nntliMwiflni. LM, 181 

In agriculture. II I 
In in mi Rf, LSI 
In law, . 

Boumi School, E81 

■lUBMJt Minor 

Burvojlag, 171 

Suspension, 38 
Tax Commission prist 
Teachers' Bureau. .".1 
Teachers' Certificates, SS, 1 
Textiles and clothing. 

Tins, ift, m 

Theta l'si Fraternity. 44 
Tuition. Kates of. 



l'ni\« : 

Location and | 

Cm. riiinciit and irTglftlwUlf I ' 
•«lilf Hardening. 

Vrtcrlli.i 
Violin 

\ 

Withdrawal fr«nr 

I .ru-Mi la Lav Qamrfe rl 

Women. I>ean <■: 
W.,m. us Hall, 49 
Women's student §Wtt1 

association. 4s 
Work done in ahscn. . 
1 M C. A.. 43 
V U ('. A.. 44 

loologl -■"■ 111 




£w: 



15 
1919-1920 



V*.* 









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